1440s

The 1440s decade ran from January 1, 1440, to December 31, 1449.

Events

1440

  • Itzcóatl, Aztec ruler of Tenochtitlan, dies and is succeeded by Moctezuma I (Moctezuma Ilhuicamina).
  • Lorenzo Valla's De falso credita et ementita Constantini Donatione declamatio demonstrates that the Donation of Constantine is a forgery.
  • Eton College is founded by Henry VI of England.
  • Sir Richard Molyneux is appointed constable of Liverpool Castle, in England.
  • The Ming Dynasty government of China begins a decade-long series of issuing harsh edicts towards those who illegally mine silver, the latter known as 'miner bandits' (kuangzei), a trend begun in 1438. The government wants to cap the amount of silver circulating into the market, as more grain taxes are converted into silver taxes. The government establishes community night watches known as 'watches and tithings' (baojia), who ensure that illegal mining activities are brought to a halt. However, these are desperate measures, as illegal silver mining continues to thrive as a dangerous but lucrative venture.
  • Zhu Quan writes the Cha Pu ("Tea manual") in China.

1441

1442

1443

1444

1445

1446

1447

1448

1449

Significant people

Births

Deaths

References

  1. ^ Hazlitt, W. Carew (1900). The Venetian Republic: Its Rise, its Growth, and its Fall, 421–1797. Volume II, 1423–1797. London: Adam and Charles Black. pp. 79–80.
  2. ^ Green, Toby. A fistful of shells : West Africa from the rise of the slave trade to the age of revolution. Chicago. ISBN 9780226644578. OCLC 1051687994.
  3. ^ Thomas, Hugh (1999). The Slave Trade: The Story of the Atlantic Slave Trade: 1440 - 1870. Simon and Schuster. pp. 22. ISBN 9780684835655.
  4. ^ "A.B.C. Isn't Simple as A.B.C. in Korea— Alphabet on 525th Birthday, Both Hailed and Assailed", The New York Times, October 10, 1971, p. 8
  5. ^ Setton, Kenneth M. (1978), The Papacy and the Levant (1204–1571), Volume II: The Fifteenth Century, DIANE Publishing, pp. 96–97, ISBN 0-87169-127-2
  6. ^ "ИОНА". Retrieved 5 March 2015.
  7. ^ "College History | Queens' College". www.queens.cam.ac.uk. Retrieved 2020-02-04.

Copyright