1616

1616 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1616
MDCXVI
Ab urbe condita 2369
Armenian calendar 1065
ԹՎ ՌԿԵ
Assyrian calendar 6366
Balinese saka calendar 1537–1538
Bengali calendar 1023
Berber calendar 2566
English Regnal year 13 Ja. 1 – 14 Ja. 1
Buddhist calendar 2160
Burmese calendar 978
Byzantine calendar 7124–7125
Chinese calendar 乙卯(Wood Rabbit)
4312 or 4252
    — to —
丙辰年 (Fire Dragon)
4313 or 4253
Coptic calendar 1332–1333
Discordian calendar 2782
Ethiopian calendar 1608–1609
Hebrew calendar 5376–5377
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1672–1673
 - Shaka Samvat 1537–1538
 - Kali Yuga 4716–4717
Holocene calendar 11616
Igbo calendar 616–617
Iranian calendar 994–995
Islamic calendar 1024–1025
Japanese calendar Genna 2
(元和2年)
Javanese calendar 1536–1537
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 10 days
Korean calendar 3949
Minguo calendar 296 before ROC
民前296年
Nanakshahi calendar 148
Thai solar calendar 2158–2159
Tibetan calendar 阴木兔年
(female Wood-Rabbit)
1742 or 1361 or 589
    — to —
阳火龙年
(male Fire-Dragon)
1743 or 1362 or 590
The Dutch establish the colony of Essequibo

1616 (MDCXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1616th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 616th year of the 2nd millennium, the 16th year of the 17th century, and the 7th year of the 1610s decade. As of the start of 1616, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Events

January–June

March 31: Emperor Jahangir of India (reign 1605-1627) conferred the title of Nur Jahan on his wife <Tuzuk i Jahangiri, The Memoirs of Jahangir>

  • April 25 – Sir John Coke, in the Court of King's Bench (England), holds the King's actions in a case of In commendam to be illegal.
  • May 25 – King James I of England's former favourite, the Earl of Somerset, and his wife Frances, are convicted of the murder of Thomas Overbury in 1613. They are spared death, and are sentenced to imprisonment in the Tower of London (until 1622).[8] Although the King has ordered the investigation of the poet's murder and allowed his former court favorite to be arrested and tried, his court, now under the influence of George Villiers, gains the reputation of being corrupt and vile. The sale of peerages (beginning in July)[9] and the royal visit of James's brother-in-law, Christian IV of Denmark, a notorious drunkard, add further scandal.
  • May 3 – The Treaty of Loudun is signed, ending a series of rebellions in France.
  • June 12Pocahontas (now Rebecca) arrives in England, with her husband, John Rolfe, their one-year-old son, Thomas Rolfe, her half-sister Matachanna (alias Cleopatra) and brother-in-law Tomocomo, the shaman also known as Uttamatomakkin (having set out in May). Ten Powhatan Indians are brought by Sir Thomas Dale, the colonial governor, at the request of the Virginia Company, as a fund-raising device. Dale, having been recalled under criticism, writes A True Relation of the State of Virginia, Left by Sir Thomas Dale, Knight, in May last, 1616, in a successful effort to redeem his leadership. Neither Pocahontas or Dale see Virginia again.

July–December

Date unknown

Ongoing

Births

January–March

April–June

July–September

October–December

Date unknown

Probable

Deaths

January–March

April–June

July–September

October–December

Date unknown

Probable

References

  1. ^ Jehângïr's period of stay at Ajmer was from 5 Shawwäl 1022 to 1 Zil-qä'da 1025 equivalent to November 8, 1613, to October 31, 1616.
  2. ^ Strachan, Michael (2004). "Roe, Sir Thomas (1581–1644)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/23943. Retrieved October 9, 2012. (subscription or UK public library membership required)
  3. ^ "East Indies: February 1616". Calendar of State Papers Colonial, East Indies, China and Japan: 1513–1616. 2. 1864. pp. 457–461. Retrieved March 1, 2008.
  4. ^ Donaldson, Ian (2004). "Jonson, Benjamin (1572–1637)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/15116. Retrieved October 9, 2012.
  5. ^ a b Event dated with reference to historical documents. "Global Volcanism Program". Smithsonian Institution. Retrieved March 12, 2008.
  6. ^ Penguin Pocket On This Day. Penguin Reference Library. 2006. ISBN 0-14-102715-0.
  7. ^ a b Everett, Jason M., ed. (2006). "1616". The People's Chronology. Thomson Gale.
  8. ^ Bellany, Alastair (2004). "Carr, Robert, earl of Somerset (1585/6?–1645)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/4754. Retrieved October 9, 2012.
  9. ^ a b Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 170–172. ISBN 0-7126-5616-2.
  10. ^ Arano, Yasunori (2005). "The Formation of a Japanocentric World Order". International Journal of Asian Studies. 2 (2): 201. doi:10.1017/s1479591405000094.
  11. ^ Kellett, Arnold (2003). King James's School, 1616–2003. Knaresborough: King James's School. ISBN 0-9545195-0-7.
  12. ^ Published 1631.
  13. ^ The Encyclopedia of English Renaissance Literature (The Wiley-Blackwell Encyclopedia of Literature), 1st Edition, Wiley-Blackwell, West Sussex, 2012 [1]
  14. ^ "Robert Burton | English author, scholar, and clergyman". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved September 7, 2018.
  15. ^ Bland, M. (1998). "William Stansby and the production of the Workes of Beniamin Jonson, 1615–16". The Library. Bibliographical Society. 20: 10. doi:10.1093/library/20.1.1.
  16. ^ "A Basic European Earthquake Catalogue and a Database for the evaluation of long-term seismicity and seismic hazard (BEECD)" (PDF). Retrieved March 5, 2008.
  17. ^ Visram, Rozina (2002). Asians in Britain: 400 Years of History. London: Pluto Press. ISBN 0-7453-1373-6.
  18. ^ Ratnikas, Algirdas J. "Timeline Indonesia". Timelines.ws. Archived from the original on July 10, 2010. Retrieved 2010-08-12.
  19. ^ Milton, Giles (1999). Nathaniel's Nutmeg: Or the True and Incredible Adventures of the Spice Trader Who Changed the Course of History. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux. ISBN 978-0-374-21936-9.
  20. ^ "Mirror of the Cruel and Horrible Spanish Tyranny Perpetrated in the Netherlands, by the Tyrant, the Duke of Alba, and Other Commanders of King Philip II". World Digital Library. 1620. Retrieved August 25, 2013.
  21. ^ From an etching in the Guerre de Beauté, a series of six etchings depicting a celebration which took place in Florence in the year 1616 in honor of the prince of Urbino.
  22. ^ Bratton, Timothy (1988). "Identity of the New England Indian Epidemic of 1616–1619". Bulletin of the History of Medicine. 62 (3): 352–383.
  23. ^ Marr, J. S.; Cathey, J. T. (February 2010). "New hypothesis for cause of epidemic among native Americans, New England, 1616-1619". Emerging Infectious Diseases. 16 (2): 281–6. doi:10.3201/eid1602.090276. PMC 2957993. PMID 20113559.
  24. ^ Dobyns, Henry F. (1993). "Disease Transfer at Contact". Annual Review of Anthropology. 22: 273–291. doi:10.1146/annurev.anthro.22.1.273.
  25. ^ Spinage, Clive A. (2003). Cattle plague: a history. New York: Springer. ISBN 0-306-47789-0.
  26. ^ Bernhard, Virginia (1999). Slaves and Slaveholders in Bermuda, 1616–1782. Columbia: University of Missouri Press.
  27. ^ Mintz, Sidney W. (1986). Sweetness and Power: The Place of Sugar in Modern History. New York: Penguin. ISBN 0140092331.
  28. ^ Robbins, Russell Hope (1959). The Encyclopedia of Witchcraft and Demonology. New York: Bonanza Books.
  29. ^ Logan, Terence P.; Smith, Denzell S., eds. (1975). The Popular School: A Survey and Bibliography of Recent Studies in English Renaissance Drama. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press. p. 69.
  30. ^ Sluiter, Engel (1949). "The Fortification of Acapulco, 1615–1616". The Hispanic American Historical Review. 29 (1): 69–80. doi:10.2307/2508294. Today the fort houses the Acapulco Historical Museum.
  31. ^ His notebooks, not fully published until the 20th century, reveal a coherent mechanical philosophy of nature with incipient atomism, a force of inertia, and mathematical interpretations of natural philosophy are present. van Berkel, K. (1983). Isaac Beeckman (1588–1637) en de mechanisering van het wereldbeeld. Amsterdam.
  32. ^ Searles, Colbert (1925). "Allusions to the Contemporary Theater of 1616 by Francois Rosset". Modern Language Notes. 40 (8): 481–483.

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