1996 Cricket World Cup

Wills World Cup 1996
Wills World Cup 1996.svg
Dates 14 February – 17 March
Administrator(s) International Cricket Council
Cricket format One Day International
Tournament format(s) Round robin and Knockout
Host(s)  India
 Pakistan
 Sri Lanka
Champions  Sri Lanka (1st title)
Runners-up  Australia
Participants 12
Matches 37
Player of the series Sanath Jayasuriya
Most runs Sachin Tendulkar (523)
Most wickets Anil Kumble (15)
1992
1999

The 1996 Cricket World Cup, also called the Wills World Cup 1996 after its official sponsors, ITC's Wills brand, was the sixth Cricket World Cup organised by the International Cricket Council (ICC). It was a second World Cup to be hosted by Pakistan and India, and for the first time by Sri Lanka. The tournament was won by Sri Lanka, which defeated Australia in the final at the Gaddafi Stadium in Lahore, Pakistan.

Hosts

The World Cup was played in India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. India hosted 17 matches at 17 different venues, while Pakistan hosted 16 matches at 6 venues and Sri Lanka hosted 4 matches at 3 venues.

Controversy dogged the tournament before any games were played; Australia and the West Indies refused to send their teams to Sri Lanka following the bombing of Central Bank in Colombo by the Tamil Tigers in January 1996. Sri Lanka, in addition to offering maximum security to the teams, questioned the validity of citing security concerns when the International Cricket Council had determined it was safe. After extensive negotiations, the ICC ruled that Sri Lanka would be awarded both games on forfeit. As a result of this decision, Sri Lanka automatically qualified for the quarter-finals before playing a game.

India

Pakistan

Sri Lanka

  • Two matches were scheduled to be played at Premadasa Stadium, but neither took place as Australia and the West Indies declined to play in Sri Lanka.

Squads

Teams

All the Test-playing nations participated in the competition, including Zimbabwe, who became the ninth Test-status member of the ICC following the last World Cup. The three Associate teams (previously one) to qualify through the 1994 ICC Trophy – the United Arab Emirates, Kenya and the Netherlands – also made their World Cup debuts in 1996. The Netherlands lost all of their five matches, including a defeat to the UAE, while Kenya recorded a surprise victory over the West Indies in Pune.

Summary

The Sri Lankans, coached by Dav Whatmore and captained by Arjuna Ranatunga, used Man of the Series Sanath Jayasuriya[1] and Romesh Kaluwitharana as opening batsmen to take advantage of the fielding restrictions during the first 15 overs of each innings. At a time when 50 or 60 runs in the first 15 overs was considered adequate, Sri Lanka scored 117 runs in those overs against India, 123 against Kenya, 121 against England in the quarter-final and 86 against India in the semi-final. Against Kenya, Sri Lanka made 398 for 5, a new record for the highest team score in a One Day International that stood until April 2006. Gary Kirsten scored 188 not out against United Arab Emirates at Rawalpindi, Pakistan. This became the highest individual score ever in any World Cup match until it was surpassed by first Chris Gayle of the West Indies and later Martin Guptill who scored 215 and 237 respectively in the 2015 Cricket World Cup.

Sri Lanka won the first semi-final over India at Eden Gardens in Calcutta, in front of a crowd unofficially estimated at 110,000. After they had lost both openers cheaply, Sri Lanka launched a stunning counter-attack led by Aravinda de Silva to post a strong total of 251 for 8, in the chase India began promisingly but after the loss of Sachin Tendulkar's prized wicket they had slumped to 120 for 8 in the 35th over when sections of the crowd began to throw fruit and plastic bottles onto the field. The players left the field for 20 minutes in an attempt to quieten the crowd. When the players returned for play, more bottles were thrown onto the field and fires were lit in the stand. Match referee Clive Lloyd awarded the match to Sri Lanka, the first default ever in a Test or One Day International.

In the second semi-final in Mohali, Australia recovered from 15 for 4 to reach 207 for 8 from their 50 overs. The West Indians had reached 165 for 2 in the 42nd over before losing their last 8 wickets for 37 runs in 50 balls.

Sri Lanka won the toss in the final and sent Australia in to bat despite the team batting first having won all five previous World Cup finals. Mark Taylor top scored with 74 in Australia's total of 241 for 7. Sri Lanka won the match in the 47th over with Aravinda de Silva following his 3 for 42 with an unbeaten 107 to win the Player of the Match award. It was the first time a tournament host or co-host had won the cricket World Cup.

Group stage

Group A

Pos Team Pld W L T NR Pts NRR
1  Sri Lanka 5 5 0 0 0 10 1.607
2  Australia 5 3 2 0 0 6 0.903
3  India 5 3 2 0 0 6 0.452
4  West Indies 5 2 3 0 0 4 −0.134
5  Zimbabwe 5 1 4 0 0 2 −0.939
6  Kenya 5 1 4 0 0 2 −1.007

Group B

Pos Team Pld W L T NR Pts NRR
1  South Africa 5 5 0 0 0 10 2.043
2  Pakistan 5 4 1 0 0 8 0.961
3  New Zealand 5 3 2 0 0 6 0.552
4  England 5 2 3 0 0 4 0.079
5  United Arab Emirates 5 1 4 0 0 2 −1.830
6  Netherlands 5 0 5 0 0 0 −1.923

Knockout stage

 
Quarter-finals Semi-finals Final
 
                   
 
9 March – Faisalabad, Pakistan
 
 
 England 235/8
 
13 March – Calcutta, India
 
 Sri Lanka 236/5
 
 Sri Lanka 251/8
 
9 March – Bangalore, India
 
 India 120/8
 
 India 287/8
 
17 March – Lahore, Pakistan
 
 Pakistan 248/9
 
 Sri Lanka 245/3
 
11 March – Karachi, Pakistan
 
 Australia 241/7
 
 West Indies 264/8
 
14 March – Mohali, India
 
 South Africa 245
 
 West Indies 202
 
11 March – Madras, India
 
 Australia 207/8
 
 New Zealand 286/9
 
 
 Australia 289/4
 

Quarter-finals

Semi-finals

Final

Sri Lanka won the toss and chose to field. Mark Taylor (74 from 83 balls, 8 fours, 1 six) and Ricky Ponting (45 from 73 balls, 2 fours) shared a second-wicket partnership of 101 runs. When Ponting and Taylor were dismissed, however, Australia fell from 137/1 to 170/5 as the famed four-pronged spin attack of Sri Lanka took its toll. Despite the slump, Australia struggled on to 241/7 from their 50 overs.

Statistics

List of centuries

Name Score Balls 4s 6s S/R Team Opposition Venue Date ODI #
NJ Astle 101 132 8 2 76.51  New Zealand  England Ahmedabad 14 February 1996 1048
G Kirsten 188* 159 13 4 118.23  South Africa  United Arab Emirates Rawalpindi 16 February 1996 1049
SR Tendulkar 127* 138 15 2 92.02  India  Kenya Barabati Stadium, Cuttack 18 February 1996 1052
GA Hick 104* 133 6 2 78.19  England  Netherlands Peshawar 22 February 1996 1057
ME Waugh 130 128 14 1 101.56  Australia  Kenya Visakhapatnam 23 February 1996 1058
ME Waugh 126 135 8 3 93.33  Australia  India Wankhede Stadium, Mumbai 27 February 1996 1065
Aamer Sohail 111 139 8 0 79.85  Pakistan  South Africa National Stadium, Karachi 29 February 1996 1067
SR Tendulkar 137 137 8 5 100.00  India  Sri Lanka Feroz Shah Kotla Ground, Delhi 2 March 1996 1070
RT Ponting 102 112 5 1 91.07  Australia  West Indies Jaipur 4 March 1996 1072
AC Hudson 161 132 13 4 121.96  South Africa  Netherlands Rawalpindi 5 March 1996 1073
PA de Silva 145 115 14 5 126.08  Sri Lanka  Kenya Kandy 6 March 1996 1074
VG Kambli 106 110 11 0 96.36  India  Zimbabwe Green Park Stadium, Kanpur 6 March 1996 1075
BC Lara 111 94 16 0 118.08  West Indies  South Africa National Stadium, Karachi 11 March 1996 1079
CZ Harris 130 124 13 4 104.83  New Zealand  Australia Madras 11 March 1996 1080
ME Waugh 110 112 6 2 98.21  Australia  New Zealand Madras 11 March 1996 1080
PA de Silva 107* 124 13 0 86.29  Sri Lanka  Australia Gaddafi Stadium, Lahore 17 March 1996 1083

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