1998 Commonwealth Games

XVI Commonwealth Games
Logo of XVI Commonwealth Games Kuala Lumpur.svg
Host city Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Motto Bersama-sama Gemilangkannya
(Together we'll glorify this moment)
Nations participating 70
Athletes participating 3638
Events 214 in 15 sports
Opening ceremony 11 September
Closing ceremony 21 September
Officially opened by Tuanku Jaafar
King of Malaysia
Officially closed by Elizabeth II
Athlete's Oath Shalin Zulkifli
Queen's Baton Final Runner Koh Eng Tong
Anthem Forever as One (Roy)
Main venue Bukit Jalil National Stadium
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The 1998 Commonwealth Games (Malay: Sukan Komanwel 1998), officially known as the XVI Commonwealth Games (Malay: Sukan Komanwel ke-16), was a multi-sport event held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. This edition is marked by several unprecedented facts in the history of the event. The 1998 games were the first held in an Asian country and the last Commonwealth Games of the 20th century. This was also the first time the games took place in a nation with a head of state other than the Head of the Commonwealth, and the first time the games were held in a country whose majority of the population did not have English as the first language. For the first time ever, the games included team sports. The other bid from the 1998 games came from Adelaide in Australia.[1] Malaysia was the eighth nation to host the Commonwealth Games after Canada, England, Australia, New Zealand, Wales, Jamaica and Scotland. Around 3638 athletes from 70 Commonwealth member nations participated at the games which featured 214 events in 15 sports with 34 of them collected medals.[2]

Host selection

Kuala Lumpur was selected to stage the games at the General Assembly of the Commonwealth Games Federation in Barcelona, Spain during the 1992 Summer Olympics.[1]

1998 Commonwealth Games Bidding Results
City CGA Name Votes
Kuala Lumpur  Malaysia 40
Adelaide  Australia 25

Preparation

Venues

[3][4]

Kuala Lumpur
National Sports Complex, Malaysia
Bukit Kiara Sports Complex
  • Juara Stadium – Netball
  • National Lawn Bowls Centre – Lawn Bowls
Other venues
Selangor
Kedah
  • Langkawi International Shooting Range (Lisram) – Shooting

The athletes' village (Vista Kommanwel) with a capacity of 6,000 people is located beside the National Sports Complex in Bukit Jalil. It consists of three tower blocks of 30 storeys and six hillside blocks of 19 storeys with 1,300 condominiums and an International Shopping Zone. The International Broadcast Centre was constructed at Angkasapuri, Kuala Lumpur, while Mint Hotel (now Nouvelle Hotel) served as the Main Press Centre. State broadcaster Radio Televisyen Malaysia was the host broadcaster of the event.[5]

Opening ceremony

The 16th Commonwealth Games opening ceremony took place on 11 September 1998 at 20:00 MST (UTC+08:00). During the ceremony, approximately 4,840 Soka Gakkai volunteers displayed coloured flip cards which depicted sporting images, flags of the Commonwealth nations and messages that heralded the first games in Asia in the 68 years since their inception. The ceremony was preceded by a pre-show concert by Malaysian pop singers such as Jamal Abdillah, Amy Search, Saleem, Zamani, Norzila Binti Haji Aminuddin, Shahrul Anuar Zain, Siti Roziana Binti Zain, Shaheila binti Abdul Majid, Amy Mastura Binti Suhaimi, Ning Baizura binti Sheikh Hamzah and Siti Nurhaliza Binti Tarudin, performance by local comedian Harith Iskander and 16 paratroopers who descended down the stadium.

The ceremony began with the arrival of dignitaries including the Chairman of Commonwealth Games Federation Mr Michael Fennel, Prince Edward, Sultan of Brunei Hassanal Bolkiah, Prime Minister Dato Seri, Dr Mahathir Mohamad, the Yang Dipertuan Agong and Malaysian minister of Youth and Sports Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin. This was followed by the parade of nations — 69 participating nations, led by mascot Wira and previous games' mascots (Canada being the first country to come into the stadium as host country of the previous games, and Malaysia entering last as hosts).The Singaporean delegation was jeered by the crowd during the parade of nations.[6] Then came a performance about a Malaysian rainforest by 2,000 school children who dressed as birds, bees and flowers.[7]

After the performance, the Queen's message was delivered in the ceremonial baton, which had begun the final stages of its journey on the back of an elephant. 1978 Commonwealth Games badminton gold medal winner Sylvia Ng took the last lap with the baton and handed it off to Koh Eng Tong, a weightlifter who won a gold medal in weightlifting for Malaya in the 1950 British Empire Games, to take the final few feet to Prince Edward.

Contrary to tradition, the games were officially opened by the Malaysian head of state, Yang di Pertuan Agong Tuanku Jaafar by striking the gong three times. A burst of fireworks and blurring of the giant bunga raya and a 16-gun salute which represents 1998 Commonwealth Games being the 16th-edition games, signified the beginning of the games.[8][9][10] The Commonwealth Games flag was then brought into the stadium raised to the theme song of the Games Forever As One written by local composer, Goh Boon Hoe. Malaysian bowler Shalin Zulkifli later take the oath on behalf of the athletes.

The ceremony concluded with a 40-minute performance, titled "Aur di Tebing" (Bamboo at the riverside) with the theme 'Unity towards Progress', which was conveyed through dance, music, and intricate human graphics. 2,000 performers swirled and danced carrying trays of bunga emas (golden flowers) on their heads during a mass silat display. The show told the Malaysian history from ancient Malacca to the present development in Malaysia, its political, economical and technological achievements as well as its people's vision of peace, prosperity and unity and lifestyle.[7]

Closing ceremony

The closing ceremony took place on 21 September 1998 at 20:00 MST (UTC+08:00). The attendees of the ceremony included Raja Permaisuri Agong, Tuanku Najihah, Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad and his wife, Commonwealth Games Federation President (CGF),Sir Michael Fennel; Commonwealth of Nations Secretary-general Chief Emeka Anyaoku; Minister of youth and sports Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin and Executive Chairman of Sukom Ninety Eight Berhad, Tan Sri Hashim Mohd. Ali.

The ceremony began with Queen Elizabeth and King Ja'afar's arrival in a limousine, for inspection of guards of honour of the Royal Malay Regiment. The British national anthem God Save The Queen was played followed by Malaysia's national anthem Negaraku. This was followed by a 3-part cultural performance led by a band performance by 400 school students from Johor, Negeri Sembilan, Selangor and Kuala Lumpur followed by an upbeat song performance from local artist Jay Jay.

As the protocol says, a 15-minute presentation from Manchester, England, host city of the 2002 edition, was staged which included songs, videos and a live performance from the group New Order at the Albert Square, also the main moment was when message from British Prime Minister Tony Blair was delivered.

A contemporary farewell dance performance by local artists, featured Siti Nurhaliza and Noraniza Idris concludes the cultural performance. Soon afterwards, all the participants, flag-bearers and the volunteers march into the main ground of the stadium and Olympic council of Malaysia president Tan Sri Hamzah Abu Samah later declared the returning of the flags of all the participating nations.

Then the protocol was resumed and the 69 Commonwealth Games Associations flagbearers positioned themselves in a rostrum and the Commonwealth Games flag was lowered by the Malaysian armed forces. Next, the flag of the Commonwealth Games Federation is lowered by Malaysian Armed Forces personnel to the games theme song, Forever as one and is paraded around the stadium before being folded and handed over to the mayor of Kuala Lumpur, Tan Sri Kamarulzaman Sharif, who handed it over to the president of the Commonwealth Games Federation, Jamaican Michael Fennel.Fennel handed the flag to the Chief Citizen of Manchester city, Gordon Conquest. Following, the official speeches were delivered and Queen Elisabeth was invited to declare the Games closed. In a new protocol step, the Queen has withdrew from the stadium alongside the King of Malaysia and other authorities, after the guard of honour march song has played, followed by Auld Lang Syne. The prime minister of Malaysia, Mahathir Mohamad, later made an announcement to declare 28 September 1998 as a national public holiday to commemorate the nation's success in hosting the games. The ceremony concluded with a concert performed by Six Commonwealth Top Singers representing the six regions of the Commonwealth Federation and local artists.[11][12][13]

Participating teams

Participating countries

Sixty-nine teams were represented at the 1998 Games. The only absent country was Nigeria who suspended from Commonwealth due to the tyrannical dictatorship of Sani Abacha who had died earlier that year.[14]

Participating Commonwealth Games Associations
  •  Anguilla
  •  Antigua and Barbuda
  •  Australia
  •  Bahamas
  •  Bangladesh
  •  Barbados
  •  Belize
  •  Bermuda
  •  Botswana
  •  British Virgin Islands
  •  Brunei
  •  Cameroon
  •  Canada
  •  Cayman Islands
  •  Cook Islands
  •  Cyprus
  •  Dominica
  •  England
  •  Falkland Islands
  •  Fiji
  •  Ghana
  •  Gibraltar
  •  Grenada
  •  Guernsey
  •  Guyana
  •  India
  •  Isle of Man
  •  Jamaica
  •  Jersey
  •  Kenya
  •  Kiribati
  •  Lesotho
  •  Malawi
  •  Malaysia
  •  Maldives
  •  Malta
  •  Mauritius
  •  Montserrat
  •  Mozambique
  •  Namibia
  •  Nauru
  •  New Zealand
  •  Norfolk Island
  •  Northern Ireland
  •  Pakistan
  •  Papua New Guinea
  •  Saint Helena and Dependencies
  •  Saint Kitts and Nevis
  •  Saint Lucia
  •  Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
  •  Samoa
  •  Scotland
  •  Seychelles
  •  Sierra Leone
  •  Singapore
  •  Solomon Islands
  •  South Africa
  •  Sri Lanka
  •  Swaziland
  •  Tanzania
  •  The Gambia
  •  Tonga
  •  Trinidad and Tobago
  •  Turks and Caicos Islands
  •  Tuvalu
  •  Uganda
  •  Vanuatu
  •  Wales
  •  Zambia
  •  Zimbabwe
Debuting Commonwealth countries and territories
  •  Cameroon
  •  Kiribati
  •  Mozambique
  •  Tuvalu

Calendar


Sports overview

The host nation achieved its best-ever haul of ten gold medals which has since been surpassed by its achievement in the 2010 Commonwealth Games, where Malaysia won twelve gold medals.

The 16th Commonwealth Games host newly introduced team sports of cricket, field hockey, netball and rugby sevens and individuals sports of ten-pin bowling and squash, while of athletics, badminton, boxing, cycling, gymnastics, lawn bowls, shooting, swimming and weightlifting to make a total of 15 sports contested.

In front of 20,000 fans at the Petaling Jaya Stadium, rugby sevens in particular were an enormous success with New Zealand collecting its 100th Commonwealth Games medal with a 21–12 win over plucky Fiji, (the reigning world champions). Man of the match was the giant Jonah Lomu who had worked tirelessly during the 10-minutes-each-way final. Led by veteran star David Campese, Australia took the bronze beating Samoa 33–12.

In the squash event many had anticipated a close match between Michelle Martin and Sarah Fitz-Gerald who had both comfortably won their respective semi-finals. Fitz-Gerald had won the previous two years' World Opens and Martin the three prior to that and so it was with some surprise to many that Martin took the gold in three straight sets 9–0, 9–6, 9–5. Fitz-Gerald did avenge this defeat in the final of the world championship later that year, in what many people regard as the greatest women's final ever, coming back from 8–2 down in the fifth to retain her title.
Martin also teamed up with Craig Rowland to take the Commonwealth mixed doubles gold.

Erika-Leigh Stirton took five of the six available gold medals in the rhythmic gymnastics only being beaten into second place in the team event in the hosts took gold.[15][16]

Medal table

Only the top ten successful nations are displayed here.

The ranking in this table is consistent with International Olympic Committee convention in its published medal tables. By default, the table is ordered by the number of gold medals the athletes from a nation have won (in this context, a "nation" is an entity represented by a Commonwealth Games Association). The number of silver medals is taken into consideration next and then the number of bronze medals. If nations are still tied, equal ranking is given and they are listed alphabetically by their three-letter country code.[17][18]

Key

  *   Host nation (Malaysia)

Rank CGA Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Australia (AUS) 80 61 58 199
2  England (ENG) 36 47 53 136
3  Canada (CAN) 30 31 38 99
4  Malaysia (MAS)* 10 14 12 36
5  South Africa (RSA) 9 11 14 34
6  New Zealand (NZL) 8 7 20 35
7  Kenya (KEN) 8 5 4 17
8  India (IND) 7 10 8 25
9  Jamaica (JAM) 4 2 0 6
10  Wales (WAL) 3 4 8 15
11  Scotland (SCO) 3 2 7 12
12  Nauru (NRU) 3 0 0 3
13  Northern Ireland (NIR) 2 1 2 5
14  Zimbabwe (ZIM) 2 0 3 5
15  Ghana (GHA) 1 1 3 5
16  Mauritius (MRI) 1 1 2 4
17  Cyprus (CYP) 1 1 1 3
 Tanzania (TAN) 1 1 1 3
 Trinidad and Tobago (TRI) 1 1 1 3
20  Bahamas (BAH) 1 1 0 2
 Mozambique (MOZ) 1 1 0 2
22  Barbados (BAR) 1 0 2 3
23  Lesotho (LES) 1 0 0 1
24  Cameroon (CMR) 0 3 3 6
25  Namibia (NAM) 0 2 1 3
26  Seychelles (SEY) 0 2 0 2
27  Sri Lanka (SRI) 0 1 1 2
28  Bermuda (BER) 0 1 0 1
 Fiji (FIJ) 0 1 0 1
 Isle of Man (IOM) 0 1 0 1
 Pakistan (PAK) 0 1 0 1
32  Papua New Guinea (PNG) 0 0 1 1
 Uganda (UGA) 0 0 1 1
 Zambia (ZAM) 0 0 1 1
Totals (34 CGAs) 214 214 245 673

Marketing

Wira, the orangutan, the official mascot of the games.

The logo of the 1998 Commonwealth Games is an image of the national flower of Malaysia, the hibiscus (the bunga raya), the first games logo to introduce the colour yellow. (All previous logos had been red, white and blue to reflect the colours of the British Union Flag.) The red, blue, white and yellow colours represents the colours of the Malaysian national flag and Malaysia as a confident, young, dynamic nation. The yellow pollens represent the six regions of the world that includes the 68 Commonwealth member nations.

Mascot

The official mascot of the 1998 Commonwealth Games is an orangutan named Wira (Malay for "warrior" or "hero"). It is said that the orangutan is the largest and probably the most intelligent primate in Asia which lives in the tropical rainforests of Malaysia. The adoption of orangutan as a games' mascot is to represent the friendly personality of Malaysia as the games' host as well as the charm, intelligence, and sporting ability of the participating athletes.[19]

Sponsors

A total of 55 companies and organisations sponsored the games, including Malaysian state-owned enterprises.

Medals by event

Aquatics

Athletics

Badminton

Boxing

Cricket

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Men's cricket  South Africa  Australia  New Zealand

Cycling

Gymnastics

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Women's balance beam Trudy McIntosh
 Australia
Zeena McLaughlin
 Australia
Lisa Leveille
 Canada
Women's floor exercise Annika Reeder
 England
Allana Slater
 Australia
Zeena McLaughlin
 Australia
Women's uneven bars Lisa Skinner
 Australia
Veronique Leeleve
 Canada
Zeena McLaughlin
 Australia
Women's vault Lisa Mason
 England
Trudy McIntosh
 Australia
Annika Reeder
 England
Women's all round individual Zeena McLaughlin
 Australia
Allana Slater
 Australia
Trudy McIntosh
 Australia
Women's all round team event  Australia
Allana Slater
Katarina Frketic
Lisa Skinner
Trudy McIntosh
Zeena McLaughlin
 England
Annika Reeder
Gemma Cuff
Kelly Hackman
Lisa Mason
Melissa Wilcox
 Canada
Crystal Gilmore
Emilie Fournier
Katie Rowland
Lise Leveille
Veronique Leclerc
Men's floor exercise Andrei Kravtsov
 Australia
Christian Brezeanu
 South Africa
John Smethurst
 England
David Phillips
 New Zealand
Men's horizontal or high bar Alexander Jeltkov
 Canada
Kris Burley
 Canada
Lee McDermott
 England
Men's parallel bars Andrei Kravtsov
 Australia
Richard Ikede
 Canada
Brett Hudson
 Australia
Men's pommel horse Andrei Kravtsov
 Australia
Richard Ikede
 Canada
Brennon Dowrick
 Australia
Men's rings Pavel Mamine
 Australia
Andrew Atherton
 England
Athol Myhill
 South Africa
Men's vault Simon Hutcheon
 South Africa
Christian Brezeanu
 South Africa
Brett Hudson
 Australia
Men's all round individual Andrei Kravtsov
 Australia
Andrew Atherton
 England
Brennon Dowrick
 Australia
Men's all round team event  England
Andrew Atherton
Craig Heap
John Smethurst
Lee McDermott
Ross Brewer
 Australia
Andrei Kravtsov
Brennon Dowrick
Brett Hudson
Pavel Mamine
Philippe Rizzo
 Canada
Alexander Jeltkov
Grant Golding
Kristan Burley
Peter Schmid
Richard Ikeda
Women's rhythmic clubs Erika Leigh Stirton
 Canada
Shaneez Johnston
 Australia
Emilie Livingston
 Canada
Women's rhythmic hoop Erika Leigh Stirton
 Canada
Thye Chee Kiat
 Malaysia
Leigh Marning
 Australia
Women's rhythmic ribbon Erika Leigh Stirton
 Canada
Shaneez Johnston
 Australia
Carolyn Au Yong
 Malaysia
Women's rhythmic rope Erika Leigh Stirton
 Canada
Leigh Marning
 Australia
Thye Chee Kiat
 Malaysia
Women's rhythmic all round individual Erika Leigh Stirton
 Canada
Leigh Marning
 Australia
Shaneez Johnston
 Australia
Women's rhythmic all round team  Malaysia
Carolyn Au-Yong
Chee Kiat Thye
El Regina Tajudin
Sarina Sundara Rajah
 Canada
Emilie Livingston
Erika Leigh Stirton
Katie Iafolla
 Australia
Danielle Leray
Kristy Darrah
Leigh Marning
Shaneez Johnston

(Field) Hockey

Lawn bowls

Netball

Rugby sevens

Shooting

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Men's air pistol individual Mick Gault
 England
Jaspal Rana
 India
Greg Yelavich
 New Zealand
Women's air pistol individual Annemarie Forder
 Australia
Christine Trefry
 Australia
Tania Corrigan
 New Zealand
Men's air pistol team Nick Baxter and Mick Gault
 England
Jaspal Rana and Satendra Kumar
 India
John Rochon and Jean-Pierre Huot
 Canada
Women's air pistol pairs Annemarie Forder and Christine Trefry
 Australia
Tania Corrigan and Jocelyn Lees
 New Zealand
Kamisah Abdul Jalal and Suriani Othman
 Malaysia
Men's air rifle individual Chris Hector
 England
Mohd Emran Zakaria
 Malaysia
Zlatko Beneta
 Australia
Women's air rifle individual Nurul Huda Baharin
 Malaysia
Sharon Bowes
 Canada
Louise Minett
 England
Men's air rifle team Chris Hector and Nigel Wallace
 England
Abdul Mutalib Abdul Razak and Mohammed Emran Zakaria
 Malaysia
David Rattray and Robin Law
 Scotland
Women's air rifle pairs Christina Ashcroft and Sharon Bowes
 Canada
Belinda Muehlberg and Noemi Rostas
 Australia
Louise Minett and Becky Spicer
 England
Men's 25 m centre-fire pistol individual Jaspal Rana
 India
Allan McDonald
 South Africa
John Rochon
 Canada
Men's 25 m centre-fire pistol pairs Jaspal Rana and Ashok Pandit
 India
John Rochon and Metodi Igorov
 Canada
Mike Giustiniano and Bruce Quick
 Australia
Men's Clay Pigeon trap individual Michael Diamond
 Australia
Ian Peel
 England
Desmond Coe
 New Zealand
Men's free pistol individual Mick Gault
 England
Francois Van Tonder
 South Africa
Bruce Quick
 Australia
Men's free pistol pairs Nick Baxter and Mick Gault
 England
David Moore and Bruce Quick
 Australia
John Rochon and Jean-Pierre Huot
 Canada
Fullbore rifle Queens prize open pair David Calvert and Martin Millar
 Northern Ireland
James Paton and Alain Marion
 Canada
David Davies and Christopher Hockley
 Wales
Fullbore rifle Queens prize open individual James Paton
 Canada
Zainal Abidin Md Zain
 Malaysia
Andrew Luckman
 England
Men's Olympic trap individual Michael Diamond
 Australia
Ian Peel
 England
Desmond Coe
 New Zealand
Men's Olympic trap team Mansher Singh and Manavjit Singh
 India
Michael Diamond and Ben Kelley
 Australia
Bob Borsley and Ian Peel
 England
Men's 25 m rapid fire pistol individual Metodi Igorov
 Canada
Allan McDonald
 South Africa
Bhanwar Dhaka
 India
Men's 25 m rapid fire pistol pairs Mike Giustiniano and Pat Murray
 Australia
Jason Wakeling and Alan Earle
 New Zealand
Allan McDonald and André van Emmenis
 South Africa
Men's skeet individual Desmond Davies
 Wales
Joe Trinci
 Canada
David Cunningham
 Australia
Men's skeet pairs Costas Stratis and Antonis Nicolaides
 Cyprus
Andy Austin and Drew Harvey
 England
Douglas McCutcheon and Joe Trinci
 Canada
Men's smallbore rifle three positions individual Timothy Lowndes
 Australia
Wayne Sorensen
 Canada
Kenneth Parr
 England
Men's free rifle three positions pairs Michael Dion and Wayne Sorensen
 Canada
Les Imgrund and Tim Lowndes
 Australia
Chris Hector and Kenneth Parr
 England
Men's free rifle prone individual Stephen Petterson
 New Zealand
David Moore
 Isle of Man
Gavin van Rhyn
 South Africa
Men's free rifle prone pairs Gavin van Rhyn and Michael Thiele
 South Africa
Philip Scanlan and Neil Day
 England
Tim Lowndes and Warren Potent
 Australia
Women's free rifle prone individual Roopa Unnikrishnan
 India
Carrie Quigley
 Australia
Sally Johnston
 New Zealand
Women's free rifle prone pairs Carrie Quigley and Kim Frazer
 Australia
Christina Ashcroft and Maureen Spinney
 Canada
Susan Bell and Shirley McIntosh
 Scotland
Women's smallbore sport rifle three positions individual Susan McCready
 Australia
Sharon Bowes
 Canada
Roslina Bakar
 Malaysia
Women's smallbore sport rifle Three positions pairs Sharon Bowes and Christina Ashcroft
 Canada
Val Martin and Donna Potgieter
 South Africa
Shirley McIntosh and Janis Thomson
 Scotland
Women's sport pistol individual Christine Trefry
 Australia
Bibiana Ng Pei Chin
 Malaysia
Kim Eagles
 Canada
Women's sport pistol pairs Christine Trefry and Annette Woodward
 Australia
Tania Corrigan and Jocelyn Lees
 New Zealand
Bibiana Ng Pei Chin and Norsita Mahmud
 Malaysia

Squash

Bowling

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Men's singles Kenny Ang
 Malaysia, 6046 points
Bill Rowe
 Canada, 5946
Warren Rennox
 Canada, 5850
Women's singles Cara Honeychurch
 Australia, 6406
Maxine Nable
 Australia, 6028
Lai Kin Ngoh
 Malaysia, 5920
Men's doubles Kenny Ang and Ben Heng
 Malaysia, 3522
Antoine Jones and Conrad Lister
 Bermuda, 3329
Michael Muir and Frank Ryan
 Australia, 3229
Women's doubles Cara Honeychurch and Maxine Nable
 Australia, 3678
Lai Kin Ngoh and Shalin Zulkifli
 Malaysia, 3548
Pauline Buck and Gemma Burden
 England, 3536
Mixed doubles Frank Ryan and Cara Honeychurch
 Australia, 3605
Richard Hood and Pauline Buck
 England, 3560
Bill Rowe and Jane Amlinger
 Canada, 3536

Weightlifting

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Men's 56 kg snatch Mehmey Yagci
 Australia, 107.5 kg
Arumugam K. Pandian
 India 107.5 kg
Matin Guntali
 Malaysia, 105 kg
Men's 56 kg clean and jerk Dharmaraj Wilson
 India, 140 kg
Arumugam K. Pandian
 India 137.5 kg
Matin Guntali
 Malaysia, 135 kg
Men's 56 kg combined Arumugam K. Pandian
 India, 245 kg
Dharmaraj Wilson
 India, 242.5 kg
Matin Guntali
 Malaysia, 240 kg
Men's 62 kg snatch Marcus Stephen
 Nauru, 125 kg
Yurik Sarkisyan
 Australia, 125 kg
Ganapathy Gnanasekar
 India, 117.5 kg
Men's 62 kg clean and jerk Marcus Stephen
 Nauru, 167.5 kg
Yurik Sarkisyan
 Australia, 157.5 kg
Murugesan Arun
 India, 155 kg
Men's 62 kg combined Marcus Stephen
 Nauru, 292.5 kg
Yurik Sarkisyan
 Australia, 282.5 kg
Murugesan Arun
 India, 272.5 kg
Men's 69 kg snatch Sebastien Groulx
 Canada, 130 kg
Stewart Cruickshank
 England, 130 kg
Tony Morgan
 Wales, 130 kg,
Men's 69 kg clean and jerk Muhamad Hidayat Hamidon
 Malaysia, 167.5 kg
Sebastien Groulx
 Canada, 167.5 kg
G. Vadivelu
 India, 135.5 kg
Men's 69 kg combined Sebastien Groulx
 Canada, 297.5 kg
Muhamad Hidayat Hamidon
 Malaysia, 295 kg
Sandeep Kumar
 India, 285 kg
Men's 77 kg snatch Satheesha Rai
 India, 147.5 kg
Dave Morgan
 Wales, 145 kg
Damian Brown
 Australia, 140 kg
Men's 77 kg clean and jerk Damian Brown
 Australia, 187.5 kg
Satheesha Rai
 India, 175 kg
Alain Bilodeau
 Canada, 167.5 kg
Men's 77 kg combined Damian Brown
 Australia, 327.5 kg
Satheesha Rai
 India, 322.5 kg
Alain Bilodeau
 Canada, 305 kg
Men's 85 kg snatch Stephen Ward
 England, 157.5 kg
Leon Griffin
 England, 155 kg
David Matam Matam
 Cameroon, 147.5 kg
Men's 85 kg clean and jerk Leon Griffin
 England, 192.5 kg
Stephen Ward
 England, 187.5 kg
David Matam Matam
 Cameroon, 180 kg
Men's 85 kg combined Leon Griffin
 England, 347.5 kg
Stephen Ward
 England, 345 kg
David Matam Matam
 Cameroon, 327.5 kg
Men's 94 kg snatch Kiril Kounev
 Australia, 165 kg
Anthony Arthur
 England, 152.5
Simon Heffernan
 Australia, 150 kg
Men's 94 kg clean and jerk Kiril Kounev
 Australia, 205 kg
Andy Callard
 England, 190 kg
Simon Heffernan
 Australia, 185 kg
Men's 94 kg combined Kiril Kounev
 Australia, 370 kg
Andy Callard
 England, 340 kg
Simon Heffernan
 Australia, 335 kg
Men's 105 kg snatch Akos Sandor
 Canada, 167.5 kg
Tommy Yule
 England, 160 kg
Nigel Avery
 New Zealand, 155 kg
Men's 105 kg clean and jerk Akos Sandor
 Canada, 192.5 kg
Tommy Yule
 England, 190 kg
Karl Grant
 England, 187.5 kg
Men's 105 kg combined Akos Sandor
 Canada, 360 kg
Tommy Yule
 England, 350 kg
Nigel Avery
 New Zealand, 340 kg
Men's 105+ kg snatch Darren Liddel
 New Zealand, 165 kg
Giles Greenwood
 England, 162.5 kg
Christopher Rae
 Australia, 160 kg
Men's 105+ kg clean and jerk Darren Liddel
 New Zealand, 202.5 kg
Jean Bilong
 Cameroon, 192.5 kg
Christopher Rae
 Australia, 192.5 kg
Men's 105+ kg combined Darren Liddel
 New Zealand, 367.5 kg
Christopher Rae
 Australia, 352.5 kg
Giles Greenwood
 England, 352.5 kg

Controversy

1998 Klang Valley water crisis

The 1998 Klang Valley water crisis was a water shortage that affected the biggest metropolitan region of the country. This water shortage affected almost all the residents in the Klang Valley, causing the government to impose water rationing prior to the 1998 Commonwealth Games in Kuala Lumpur.

This crisis was blamed on El Niño despite actual rainfall in the months leading up to February 1998 in Federal Territory[20] not being significantly below average. In fact in November 1997, Klang Gates Dam had its highest recorded rainfall. Similarly in October 1997 the Kajang station not far from the Semenyih dam had its highest rainfall in record.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Roper, Alexander. "The Bidding Games: The Games Behind Malaysia's Commonwealth Games". Academia.edu. Retrieved 30 September 2013.
  2. ^ "Kuala Lumpur 1998". thecgf.com.
  3. ^ "The Official Kuala Lumpur 98 - 16th Commonwealth Games Website". kl98.thecgf.com.
  4. ^ "The Official Kuala Lumpur 98 - 16th Commonwealth Games Website". kl98.thecgf.com.
  5. ^ "The Official Kuala Lumpur 98 - 16th Commonwealth Games Website". kl98.thecgf.com.
  6. ^ Jones, Terry (12 September 1998). "Opening ceremonies were as good as they get". Edmonton Sun. Retrieved 18 August 2016.
  7. ^ a b "Opening, closing programmes". Archived from the original on 16 October 2016.
  8. ^ "1998 Commonwealth Games gloriously officiated". Archived from the original on 27 January 2018. Retrieved 27 January 2018.
  9. ^ "XVI Commonwealth Games | Soka Gakkai Malaysia (SGM)". www.sgm.org.my.
  10. ^ "Glittering Ceremony Marks Commonwealth Games Opening". Archived from the original on 5 April 2018. Retrieved 4 April 2018.
  11. ^ "1998 Commonwealth Games" (PDF).
  12. ^ "Malaysia made history 10 golds placed nation in fourth place". Archived from the original on 27 January 2018. Retrieved 27 January 2018.
  13. ^ "Best Ever Commonwealth Games Comes To A Close". Archived from the original on 5 April 2018. Retrieved 4 April 2018.
  14. ^ "CNN - Nigeria suspended from Commonwealth - Nov. 11, 1995". edition.cnn.com.
  15. ^ "Past Commonwealth Games". CGF. Archived from the original on 15 February 2013. Retrieved 3 October 2012.
  16. ^ "Successful People from Our Neighborhood - Erika-Leigh Howard (Stirton) - Rhythmic Gymnast". 6 August 2013.
  17. ^ "Results". Archived from the original on 4 May 1999. Retrieved 22 February 2019.
  18. ^ "Medal". Archived from the original on 22 December 2005. Retrieved 22 February 2019.
  19. ^ "Games Operation". Official website.
  20. ^ "RAINFALL PATTERN IN MALAYSIA". web.archive.org. 17 October 2007. Retrieved 11 August 2021.

External links

Preceded by
Victoria
Commonwealth Games
Kuala Lumpur
XVI Commonwealth Games
Succeeded by
Manchester

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