1999 Cricket World Cup

ICC Cricket World Cup
England '99
Wc99.png
Logo of the ICC Cricket World Cup 1999
Dates 14 May – 20 June
Administrator(s) International Cricket Council
Cricket format One Day International
Tournament format(s) Round robin and Knockout
Host(s) England England
Scotland Scotland
Ireland Ireland
Netherlands Netherlands
Wales Wales
Champions  Australia (2nd title)
Runners-up  Pakistan
Participants 12
Matches 42
Player of the series South Africa Lance Klusener
Most runs India Rahul Dravid (461)
Most wickets New Zealand Geoff Allott (20)
Australia Shane Warne (20)
1996
2003

The 1999 Cricket World Cup (officially known as ICC Cricket World Cup '99) was the seventh edition of the Cricket World Cup, organised by the International Cricket Council (ICC). It was hosted primarily by England, with Scotland, Ireland, Wales and the Netherlands acting as co-hosts. The tournament was won by Australia, who beat Pakistan by 8 wickets in the final at Lord's Cricket Ground in London. New Zealand and South Africa were the other semi-finalists.

The tournament was hosted three years after the previous Cricket World Cup, deviating from the usual four-year gap.[1]

Format

It featured 12 teams, playing a total of 42 matches. In the group stage, the teams were divided into two groups of six; each team played all the others in their group once. The top three teams from each group advanced to the Super Sixes, a new concept for the 1999 World Cup; each team carried forward the points from the games against the other qualifiers from their group and then played each of the qualifiers from the other group (in other words, each qualifier from Group A played each qualifier from Group B and vice versa). The top four teams in the Super Sixes advanced to the semi-finals.

Qualification

The 1999 World Cup featured 12 teams, which was the same as the previous edition in 1996. The hosts England and the eight other test nations earned automatic qualification to the World Cup. The remaining three spots were decided at the 1997 ICC Trophy in Malaysia.

22 nations competed in the 1997 edition of the ICC Trophy. After going through two group stages, the semi-finals saw Kenya and Bangladesh qualify through to the World Cup. Scotland would be the third nation to qualify as they defeated Ireland in the third-place playoff.[2]

Team Method of qualification Finals appearances Last appearance Previous best performance Group
 England Hosts 7th 1996 Runners-up (1979, 1987, 1992) A
 Australia Full member 7th 1996 Champions (1987) B
 India 7th 1996 Champions (1983) A
 New Zealand 7th 1996 Semi-finals (1975, 1979, 1992) B
 Pakistan 7th 1996 Champions (1992) B
 South Africa 3rd 1996 Semi-finals (1992) A
 Sri Lanka 7th 1996 Champions (1996) A
 West Indies 7th 1996 Champions (1975, 1979) B
 Zimbabwe 5th 1996 Group stage (All) A
 Bangladesh 1997 ICC Trophy winner 1st Debut B
 Kenya 1997 ICC Trophy runner-up 2nd 1996 Group stage (1996) A
 Scotland 1997 ICC Trophy third place 1st Debut B

Venues

England

Venue City Capacity Matches
Edgbaston Cricket Ground Birmingham, West Midlands 21,000 3
County Cricket Ground Bristol 8,000 2
St Lawrence Ground Canterbury, Kent 15,000 1
County Cricket Ground Chelmsford, Essex 6,500 2
Riverside Ground Chester-Le-Street, County Durham 15,000 2
County Cricket Ground Derby, Derbyshire 9,500 1
County Cricket Ground Hove, Sussex 7,000 1
Headingley Leeds, West Yorkshire 17,500 3
Grace Road Leicester, Leicestershire 12,000 2
Lord's London, Greater London 28,000 3
London Oval London, Greater London 25,500 3
Old Trafford Manchester, Greater Manchester 22,000 3
County Cricket Ground Northampton, Northamptonshire 6,500 2
Trent Bridge Nottingham, Nottinghamshire 17,500 3
County Cricket Ground Southampton, Hampshire 6,500 2
County Cricket Ground Taunton, Somerset 6,500 2
New Road Worcester, Worcestershire 4,500 2

Outside England

Scotland played two of their Group B matches in their home country becoming the first associate nation to host games in a World Cup. One Group B match was played in Wales and Ireland respectively, while one Group A match was played in the Netherlands.

Venue City Capacity Matches
VRA Cricket Ground Netherlands Amstelveen, Netherlands 4,500 1
Sophia Gardens Wales Cardiff, Wales 15,653 1
Clontarf Cricket Club Ground Republic of Ireland Dublin, Ireland 3,200 1
The Grange Club Scotland Edinburgh, Scotland 3,000 2
Venues in Wales, Scotland and Ireland
Venues in the Netherlands

Squads

Group stage

Group A

Team Pld W L NR T NRR Pts PCF
 South Africa 5 4 1 0 0 0.86 8 2
 India 5 3 2 0 0 1.28 6 0
 Zimbabwe 5 3 2 0 0 0.02 6 4
 England 5 3 2 0 0 −0.33 6 N/A
 Sri Lanka 5 2 3 0 0 −0.81 4 N/A
 Kenya 5 0 5 0 0 −1.20 0 N/A

Group B

Team Pld W L NR T NRR Pts PCF
 Pakistan 5 4 1 0 0 0.51 8 4
 Australia 5 3 2 0 0 0.73 6 0
 New Zealand 5 3 2 0 0 0.58 6 2
 West Indies 5 3 2 0 0 0.50 6 N/A
 Bangladesh 5 2 3 0 0 −0.52 4 N/A
 Scotland 5 0 5 0 0 −1.93 0 N/A

Super Six

This stage was among the most viewed segments of the tournament, as India and Pakistan were officially at war at the time of their match, the only time this has ever happened in the history of the sport.[citation needed]

Teams who qualified for the Super Six stage only played against the teams from the other group; results against the other teams from the same group were carried forward to this stage. Results against the non-qualifying teams were therefore discarded at this point.

As a result of League match losses against New Zealand and Pakistan, even though Australia finished second in their group, they progressed to the Super Six stage with no points carried forward (PCF). India faced similar circumstances, finishing 2nd in their group but carrying forward 0 points after losing to fellow qualifiers Zimbabwe and South Africa.

Team Pld W L NR T NRR Pts PCF
 Pakistan 5 3 2 0 0 0.65 6 4
 Australia 5 3 2 0 0 0.36 6 0
 South Africa 5 3 2 0 0 0.17 6 2
 New Zealand 5 2 2 1 0 −0.52 5 2
 Zimbabwe 5 2 2 1 0 −0.79 5 4
 India 5 1 4 0 0 −0.15 2 0
Source:Cricinfo

Semi-finals

 
Semi-finals Final
 
           
 
16 June – Old Trafford, Manchester
 
 
 New Zealand 241/7
 
20 June – Lord's, London
 
 Pakistan 242/1
 
 Pakistan 132
 
17 June – Edgbaston, Birmingham
 
 Australia 133/2
 
 Australia 213
 
 
 South Africa 213
 

Final

Statistics

Lance Klusener of South Africa was declared the Player of the Tournament. Rahul Dravid of India scored the most runs (461) in the tournament. Geoff Allott of New Zealand and Shane Warne of Australia tied each other for most wickets taken (20) in the tournament. [5]

Match balls

A new type of cricket ball, the white 'Duke', was introduced for the first time in the 1999 World Cup. Despite claims from makers British Cricket Balls Ltd that the balls behaved identically to the balls used in previous World Cups,[6] experiments showed they were harder and swung more.[7]

Media

The host broadcasters for television coverage of the tournament were Sky and BBC Television.[8] In the UK, live games were divided between the broadcasters, with both screening the final live.[8] This was to be BBC's last live cricket coverage during that summer, with all of England's home Test series being shown on Channel 4 or Sky from 1999 onwards; the BBC did not show any live cricket again until August 2020.[9]

References and notes

  1. ^ "Sourav Ganguly Doubtful About ICC's Plans To Host Cricket World Cup Every Three Years". Outlook. PTI. 16 October 2019. Retrieved 23 November 2020.
  2. ^ "Carlsberg ICC Trophy, Malaysia Headlines". Retrieved 31 July 2019.
  3. ^ "Most extras in an ODI innings".
  4. ^ "Cricket World Cup 2019: Ferguson, Henry skittle Sri Lanka for 136". Cricket Country. Retrieved 1 June 2019.
  5. ^ "ICC World Cup, 1999, Final". Cricinfo. Archived from the original on 21 April 2007. Retrieved 29 April 2007.
  6. ^ "The swinging Duke is not all it seams". The Independent. London. 9 May 1999.
  7. ^ "Why white is the thing for swing". The Guardian. London. 14 May 1999.
  8. ^ a b ECB Media Release (10 March 1998). "Live coverage of the Cricket World Cup - to be staged in the UK next year". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 25 November 2014.
  9. ^ "BSkyB lands England Test coverage". BBC. 15 December 2004. Retrieved 17 May 2014.

External links

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