2003 Major League Baseball season

2003 MLB season
League Major League Baseball
Sport Baseball
Duration March 30 – October 25, 2003
Number of games 162
Number of teams 30
Draft
Top draft pick Delmon Young
Picked by Tampa Bay Devil Rays
Regular Season
Season MVP AL: Alex Rodriguez (TEX)
NL: Barry Bonds (SF)
League Postseason
AL champions New York Yankees
  AL runners-up Boston Red Sox
NL champions Florida Marlins
  NL runners-up Chicago Cubs
World Series
Champions Florida Marlins
  Runners-up New York Yankees
World Series MVP Josh Beckett (FLA)
MLB seasons

The 2003 Major League Baseball season ended when the Florida Marlins defeated the New York Yankees in a six-game World Series. The Detroit Tigers set the American League record for losses in a season, with 119, and the Marlins became the first team to win the championship twice as a wild card.

Managers

American League

National League

±hosted the MLB All Star Game

Standings

Postseason

Bracket

  Division Series
(ALDS, NLDS)
League Championship Series
(NLCS, ALCS)
World Series
                           
  1 NY Yankees 3  
3 Minnesota 1  
  1 NY Yankees 4  
American League
  4 Boston 3  
2 Oakland 2
  4 Boston 3  
    AL1 NY Yankees 2
  NL4 Florida 4
  1 Atlanta 2  
3 Chi Cubs 3  
  3 Chi Cubs 3
National League
  4 Florida 4  
2 San Francisco 1
  4 Florida 3  

Note: Two teams in the same division could not meet in the division series.

Statistical leaders

Home Field Attendance & Payroll

Team Name Wins Home attendance Per Game Est. Payroll
New York Yankees[1] 101 -1.9% 3,465,600 0.0% 42,263 $152,749,814 21.3%
Seattle Mariners[2] 93 0.0% 3,268,509 -7.7% 40,352 $86,959,167 8.3%
San Francisco Giants[3] 100 5.3% 3,264,898 0.4% 40,307 $82,852,167 5.8%
Los Angeles Dodgers[4] 85 -7.6% 3,138,626 0.2% 38,748 $105,872,620 11.6%
Anaheim Angels[5] 77 -22.2% 3,061,094 32.8% 37,330 $79,031,667 28.0%
Chicago Cubs[6] 88 31.3% 2,962,630 10.0% 36,576 $79,868,333 5.5%
St. Louis Cardinals[7] 85 -12.4% 2,910,386 -3.4% 35,931 $83,786,666 12.2%
Arizona Diamondbacks[8] 84 -14.3% 2,805,542 -12.3% 34,636 $80,657,000 -21.6%
Boston Red Sox[9] 95 2.2% 2,724,165 2.8% 33,632 $99,946,500 -7.8%
Baltimore Orioles[10] 71 6.0% 2,454,523 -8.5% 30,303 $73,877,500 14.6%
Houston Astros[11] 87 3.6% 2,454,241 -2.5% 30,299 $71,040,000 12.0%
Atlanta Braves[12] 101 0.0% 2,401,084 -7.8% 29,643 $106,243,667 13.7%
Cincinnati Reds[13] 69 -11.5% 2,355,259 26.9% 29,077 $59,355,667 31.8%
Colorado Rockies[14] 74 1.4% 2,334,085 -14.7% 28,816 $67,179,667 18.2%
Philadelphia Phillies[15] 86 7.5% 2,259,948 39.6% 27,901 $70,780,000 22.1%
Oakland Athletics[16] 96 -6.8% 2,216,596 2.2% 27,365 $50,260,834 25.6%
New York Mets[17] 66 -12.0% 2,140,599 -23.7% 26,757 $117,176,429 23.8%
Texas Rangers[18] 71 -1.4% 2,094,394 -11.0% 25,857 $103,491,667 -2.1%
San Diego Padres[19] 64 -3.0% 2,030,084 -8.6% 25,063 $45,210,000 9.1%
Minnesota Twins[20] 90 -4.3% 1,946,011 1.1% 24,025 $55,505,000 37.3%
Chicago White Sox[21] 86 6.2% 1,939,524 15.7% 23,945 $51,010,000 -10.6%
Toronto Blue Jays[22] 86 10.3% 1,799,458 9.9% 22,216 $51,269,000 -33.3%
Kansas City Royals[23] 83 33.9% 1,779,895 34.5% 22,249 $40,518,000 -14.3%
Cleveland Indians[24] 68 -8.1% 1,730,002 -33.9% 21,358 $48,584,834 -38.4%
Milwaukee Brewers[25] 68 21.4% 1,700,354 -13.7% 20,992 $40,627,000 -19.2%
Pittsburgh Pirates[26] 75 4.2% 1,636,751 -8.3% 20,207 $54,812,429 29.5%
Detroit Tigers[27] 43 -21.8% 1,368,245 -9.0% 16,892 $49,168,000 -10.7%
Florida Marlins[28] 91 15.2% 1,303,215 60.3% 16,089 $49,450,000 17.8%
Tampa Bay Devil Rays[29] 63 14.5% 1,058,695 -0.7% 13,070 $19,630,000 -42.9%
Montreal Expos[30] 83 0.0% 1,025,639 26.3% 12,662 $51,948,500 34.3%

Events

See also

References

  1. ^ "New York Yankees Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  2. ^ "Seattle Mariners Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  3. ^ "San Francisco Giants Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  4. ^ "Los Angeles Dodgers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  5. ^ "Los Angeles Angels Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  6. ^ "Chicago Cubs Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  7. ^ "St. Louis Cardinals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  8. ^ "Arizona Diamondbacks Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  9. ^ "Boston Red Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  10. ^ "Baltimore Orioles Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  11. ^ "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  12. ^ "Atlanta Braves Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  13. ^ "Cincinnati Reds Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  14. ^ "Colorado Rockies Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  15. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  16. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  17. ^ "New York Mets Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  18. ^ "Texas Rangers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  19. ^ "San Diego Padres Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  20. ^ "Minnesota Twins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  21. ^ "Chicago White Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  22. ^ "Toronto Blue Jays Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  23. ^ "Kansas City Royals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  24. ^ "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  25. ^ "Milwaukee Brewers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  26. ^ "Pittsburgh Pirates Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  27. ^ "Detroit Tigers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  28. ^ "Florida Marlins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  29. ^ "Tampa Bay Rays Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  30. ^ "Washington Nationals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  31. ^ "Charlton's Baseball Chronology". BaseballLibrary.com. Archived from the original on November 3, 2013. Retrieved December 13, 2012.
  32. ^ Mackin, Bob (2004). The Unofficial Guide to Baseball's Most Unusual Records. Canada: Greystone Books. p. 240. ISBN 9781553650386.

External links

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