2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries

2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries

← 2016 February 3 to August 11, 2020 2024 β†’

  Joe Biden February 2020 crop.jpg Bernie Sanders March 2020 (cropped).jpg Elizabeth Warren by Gage Skidmore (cropped).jpg
Candidate Joe Biden Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren
Home state Delaware Vermont Massachusetts
Delegate count 2,687[2] 1,073[2] 63[2]
Contests won 46 9 0
Popular vote 19,076,052[3] 9,679,213[3] 2,831,472[3]
Percentage 51.79% 26.28% 7.69%

  Michael Bloomberg by Gage Skidmore (cropped).jpg Pete Buttigieg by Gage Skidmore (cropped).jpg Amy Klobuchar by Gage Skidmore (cropped).jpg
Candidate Michael Bloomberg Pete Buttigieg Amy Klobuchar
Home state New York Indiana Minnesota
Delegate count 59[2] 21[2] 7[2]
Contests won 1 1 0
Popular vote 2,493,409[3] 924,237[3] 529,713[3]
Percentage 6.77% 2.51% 1.44%

  Tulsi Gabbard (48011616441) (cropped).jpg
Candidate Tulsi Gabbard
Home state Hawaii
Delegate count 2[2]
Contests won 0
Popular vote 273,940[3]
Percentage 0.74%

2020 California Democratic presidential primary2020 Oregon Democratic presidential primary2020 Washington Democratic presidential primary2020 Idaho Democratic presidential primary2020 Nevada Democratic presidential caucuses2020 Utah Democratic presidential primary2020 Arizona Democratic presidential primary2020 Montana Democratic presidential primary2020 Wyoming Democratic presidential caucuses2020 Colorado Democratic presidential primary2020 New Mexico Democratic presidential primary2020 North Dakota Democratic presidential caucuses2020 South Dakota Democratic presidential primary2020 Nebraska Democratic presidential primary2020 Kansas Democratic presidential primary2020 Oklahoma Democratic presidential primary2020 Texas Democratic presidential primary2020 Minnesota Democratic presidential primary2020 Iowa Democratic presidential caucuses2020 Missouri Democratic presidential primary2020 Arkansas Democratic presidential primary2020 Louisiana Democratic presidential primary2020 Wisconsin Democratic presidential primary2020 Illinois Democratic presidential primary2020 Michigan Democratic presidential primary2020 Indiana Democratic presidential primary2020 Ohio Democratic presidential primary2020 Kentucky Democratic presidential primary2020 Tennessee Democratic presidential primary2020 Mississippi Democratic presidential primary2020 Alabama Democratic presidential primary2020 Georgia Democratic presidential primary2020 Florida Democratic presidential primary2020 South Carolina Democratic presidential primary2020 North Carolina Democratic presidential primary2020 Virginia Democratic presidential primary2020 West Virginia Democratic presidential primary2020 District of Columbia Democratic presidential primary2020 Maryland Democratic presidential primary2020 Delaware Democratic presidential primary2020 Pennsylvania Democratic presidential primary2020 New Jersey Democratic presidential primary2020 New York Democratic presidential primary2020 Connecticut Democratic presidential primary2020 Rhode Island Democratic presidential primary2020 Vermont Democratic presidential primary2020 New Hampshire Democratic presidential primary2020 Maine Democratic presidential primary2020 Massachusetts Democratic presidential primary2020 Alaska Democratic presidential primary2020 Hawaii Democratic presidential primary2020 Puerto Rico Democratic presidential primary2020 U.S. Virgin Islands presidential caucuses#Democratic caucuses2020 Northern Mariana Islands presidential caucuses#Democratic caucuses2020 American Samoa presidential caucuses#Democratic caucuses2020 United States presidential election in Guam#Democratic caucuses2020 Democrats Abroad presidential primary Democratic Party presidential primaries results, 2020.svg
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First place by initial pledged delegate allocation
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First place by popular vote
2020 California Democratic presidential primary2020 Oregon Democratic presidential primary2020 Washington Democratic presidential primary2020 Idaho Democratic presidential primary2020 Nevada Democratic presidential caucuses2020 Utah Democratic presidential primary2020 Arizona Democratic presidential primary2020 Montana Democratic presidential primary2020 Wyoming Democratic presidential caucuses2020 Colorado Democratic presidential primary2020 New Mexico Democratic presidential primary2020 North Dakota Democratic presidential caucuses2020 South Dakota Democratic presidential primary2020 Nebraska Democratic presidential primary2020 Kansas Democratic presidential primary2020 Oklahoma Democratic presidential primary2020 Texas Democratic presidential primary2020 Minnesota Democratic presidential primary2020 Iowa Democratic presidential caucuses2020 Missouri Democratic presidential primary2020 Arkansas Democratic presidential primary2020 Louisiana Democratic presidential primary2020 Wisconsin Democratic presidential primary2020 Illinois Democratic presidential primary2020 Michigan Democratic presidential primary2020 Indiana Democratic presidential primary2020 Ohio Democratic presidential primary2020 Kentucky Democratic presidential primary2020 Tennessee Democratic presidential primary2020 Mississippi Democratic presidential primary2020 Alabama Democratic presidential primary2020 Georgia Democratic presidential primary2020 Florida Democratic presidential primary2020 South Carolina Democratic presidential primary2020 North Carolina Democratic presidential primary2020 Virginia Democratic presidential primary2020 West Virginia Democratic presidential primary2020 District of Columbia Democratic presidential primary2020 Maryland Democratic presidential primary2020 Delaware Democratic presidential primary2020 Pennsylvania Democratic presidential primary2020 New Jersey Democratic presidential primary2020 New York Democratic presidential primary2020 Connecticut Democratic presidential primary2020 Rhode Island Democratic presidential primary2020 Vermont Democratic presidential primary2020 New Hampshire Democratic presidential primary2020 Maine Democratic presidential primary2020 Massachusetts Democratic presidential primary2020 Alaska Democratic presidential primary2020 Hawaii Democratic presidential primary2020 Puerto Rico Democratic presidential primary2020 U.S. Virgin Islands presidential caucuses#Democratic caucuses2020 Northern Mariana Islands presidential caucuses#Democratic caucuses2020 American Samoa presidential caucuses#Democratic caucuses2020 United States presidential election in Guam#Democratic caucuses2020 Democrats Abroad presidential primary 2020 Democratic National Convention roll call map.svg
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First place by convention roll call

Previous Democratic nominee

Hillary Clinton

Democratic nominee

Joe Biden

The 2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries and caucuses were a series of electoral contests organized by the Democratic Party to select the 3,979[a] pledged delegates to the 2020 Democratic National Convention held on August 17–20 to determine the party's nominee for president of the United States in the 59th U.S. presidential election. The elections took place in all 50 U.S. states, the District of Columbia, five U.S. territories, and Democrats Abroad, and occurred between February 3 and August 11.

A total of 29 major candidates declared their candidacies for the primaries,[4] the largest field of presidential candidates for any American political party since 1972, exceeding the field of 17 major candidates in the 2016 Republican Party presidential primaries.[5] Former Vice President Joe Biden led polls throughout 2019, with the exception of a brief period in October when Senator Elizabeth Warren experienced a surge in support.[6] The formal beginning of the primary season was marred by controversy, as technical issues with vote reporting resulted in a three-day delay in vote counting in the Iowa caucus, as well as subsequent recounts. The certified results of the caucus eventually showed Mayor Pete Buttigieg winning the most delegates, while Senator Bernie Sanders won the popular vote in the state. Sanders then went on to win the New Hampshire primary in a narrow victory over Buttigieg before handily winning the Nevada caucus, cementing his status as the front-runner for the nomination.[7][8]

Biden, whose campaign fortunes had suffered as a result of poor performances in Iowa and New Hampshire, made a comeback by overwhelmingly winning the South Carolina primary, motivated by strong support from African-American voters, an endorsement from South Carolina Congressman Jim Clyburn, and Democratic establishment concerns about nominating Sanders.[9] Following Biden's victory in South Carolina, several candidates dropped out of the race and endorsed Biden in what was viewed as a consolidation of the party's moderate wing.[10] Biden then went on to win 10 out of 15 contests on Super Tuesday, beating back challenges from Sanders, Warren, and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, solidifying his lead.[10]

On April 8, Biden became the presumptive nominee after Sanders, the only other candidate remaining, withdrew from the race.[11] In early June, Biden passed the threshold of 1,991 delegates to win the nomination.[12][13] In total, seven candidates received pledged delegates: Biden, Sanders, Warren, Bloomberg, Buttigieg, Senator Amy Klobuchar and U.S. Representative Tulsi Gabbard.[14] On August 11, Biden announced that Senator and former presidential candidate Kamala Harris would be his running mate.[15] Biden and Harris were officially nominated for president and vice president by delegates at the Democratic National Convention on August 18 and 19.[16][17] Biden and Harris went on to win the presidency and vice presidency in the general election on November 3 defeating the incumbents President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence.

Background

After Hillary Clinton's loss in the previous election, many felt the Democratic Party lacked a clear leading figure.[18] Divisions remained in the party following the 2016 primaries, which pitted Clinton against Bernie Sanders.[19][20] Between the 2016 election and the 2018 midterm elections, Senate Democrats generally shifted to the political left in relation to college tuition, healthcare, and immigration.[21][22] The 2018 elections saw the Democratic Party regain the House of Representatives for the first time in eight years, picking up seats in both urban and suburban districts.[23][24]

Reforms since 2016

On August 25, 2018, the Democratic National Committee (DNC) members passed reforms to the Democratic Party's primary process in order to increase participation[25] and ensure transparency.[26] State parties are encouraged to use a government-run primary whenever available and increase the accessibility of their primary through same-day or automatic registration and same-day party switching. Caucuses are required to have absentee voting, or to otherwise allow those who cannot participate in person to be included.[25]

Independent of the results of the primaries and caucuses, the Democratic Party, from its group of party leaders and elected officials, also appointed 771[b] unpledged delegates (superdelegates) to participate in its national convention.

In contrast to all previous election cycles since superdelegates were introduced in 1984, superdelegates will no longer have the right to cast decisive votes on the convention's first ballot for the presidential nomination. They will be allowed to cast non-decisive votes if a candidate has clinched the nomination before the first ballot, or decisive votes on subsequent ballots in a contested convention.[27][28] In that case, the number of votes required shall increase to a majority of pledged and superdelegates combined. Superdelegates are not precluded from publicly endorsing a candidate before the convention.

There were also a number of changes to the process of nomination at the state level. A decline in the number of caucuses occurred after 2016, with Democrats in Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, Maine, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, and Washington all switching from various forms of caucuses to primaries (with Hawaii, Kansas, and North Dakota switching to party-run "firehouse primaries"). This has resulted in the lowest number of caucuses in the Democratic Party's recent history, with only three states (Iowa, Nevada, and Wyoming) and four territories (American Samoa, Guam, Northern Marianas, and U.S. Virgin Islands) using them. In addition, six states were approved in 2019 by the DNC to use ranked-choice voting in the primaries: Alaska, Hawaii, Kansas, and Wyoming for all voters; Iowa and Nevada for absentee voters.[29] Rather than eliminating candidates until a single winner is chosen, voters' choices would be reallocated until all remaining candidates have at least 15%, the threshold to receive delegates to the convention.[30]

Several states which did not use paper ballots widely in 2016 and 2018, adopted them for the 2020 primary and general elections,[31] to minimize potential interference in vote tallies, a concern raised by intelligence officials,[32] election officials[33] and the public.[34] The move to paper ballots enabled audits to start where they had not been possible before, and in 2020 about half the states audit samples of primary ballots to measure accuracy of the reported results.[35] Audits of caucus results depend on party rules, and the Iowa Democratic party investigated inaccuracies in precinct reports, resolved enough to be sure the delegate allocations were correct, and decided it did not have authority or time to correct all errors.[36][37][38]

Rules for number of delegates

The number of pledged delegates from each state is proportional to the state's share of the electoral college, and to the state's past Democratic votes for president.[39][40] Thus less weight is given to swing states and Republican states, while more weight is given to strongly Democratic states, in choosing a nominee.

Six pledged delegates are assigned to each territory, 44 to Puerto Rico, and 12 to Democrats Abroad. Each jurisdiction can also earn bonus delegates by holding primaries after March or in clusters of 3 or more neighboring states.[39]

Within states, a quarter of pledged delegates are allocated to candidates based on statewide vote totals, and the rest based on votes in each Congressional District, though some states use divisions other than congressional districts. For example, Texas uses state Senate districts.[41][39] Districts which have voted Democratic in the past get more delegates, and fewer delegates are allocated for swing districts and Republican districts.[39] For example, House Speaker Pelosi's strongly Democratic district 12 has 7 delegates, or one per 109,000 people, and a swing district, CA-10, which became Democratic in 2018, has 4 delegates, or one per 190,000 people.[42][43][44]

Candidates who received under 15% of the votes in a state or district got no delegates from that area. Candidates who got 15% or more of the votes divided delegates in proportion to their votes.[42][45] These rules apply at the state level to state delegates and within each district for those delegates. The 15% threshold was established in 1992[46] to limit "fringe" candidates.[47] The threshold now means that any sector of the party (moderate, progressive, etc.) which produces many candidates, thus dividing supporters' votes, may win few delegates, even if it wins a majority of votes.[47][48][46]

Schedule and results

Date
(daily totals)
Total pledged
delegates
Contest
and total popular vote
Delegates won and popular vote
Joe Biden Bernie Sanders Elizabeth Warren Michael Bloomberg Pete Buttigieg Amy Klobuchar Tulsi Gabbard Other
February 3 41 Iowa
172,300[c]
14[d]
23,605 (13.7%)
9
45,652 (26.5%)
5
34,909 (20.3%)

16 (0.0%)
12
43,209 (25.1%)
1
21,100 (12.2%)

16 (0.0%)

3,793 (2.2%)
February 11 24 New Hampshire
298,377

24,944 (8.4%)
9
76,384 (25.6%)

27,429 (9.2%)

4,675 (1.6%)
9
72,454 (24.3%)
6
58,714 (19.7%)

9,755 (3.3%)

24,022 (8.1%)
February 22 36 Nevada
101,543[e]
9
19,179 (18.9%)
24
41,075 (40.5%)

11,703 (11.5%)
3
17,598 (17.3%)

7,376 (7.3%)

32 (0.0%)

4,580 (4.5%)
February 29 54 South Carolina
539,263
39
262,336 (48.7%)
15
106,605 (19.8%)

38,120 (7.1%)

44,217 (8.2%)

16,900 (3.1%)

6,813 (1.3%)

64,272 (11.9%)
March 3
(Super Tuesday)
(1,344)
52 Alabama
452,093
44
286,065 (63.3%)
8
74,755 (16.5%)

25,847 (5.7%)

52,750 (11.7%)

1,416 (0.3%)

907 (0.2%)

1,038 (0.2%)

9,315 (2.1%)
6 American Samoa
351

31 (8.8%)

37 (10.5%)

5 (1.4%)
4
175 (49.9%)
2
103 (29.3%)
31 Arkansas
229,122
19[f]
93,012 (40.6%)
9
51,413 (22.4%)

22,971 (10.0%)
3
38,312 (16.7%)

7,649 (3.3%)

7,009 (3.1%)

1,593 (0.7%)

7,163 (3.1%)
415 California
5,784,364
172
1,613,854 (27.9%)
225
2,080,846 (36.0%)
11
762,555 (13.2%)
7
701,803 (12.1%)

249,256 (4.3%)

126,961 (2.2%)

33,769 (0.6%)

215,320 (3.7%)
67 Colorado
960,128
21
236,565 (24.6%)
29
355,293 (37.0%)
8
168,695 (17.6%)
9
177,727 (18.5%)

10,037 (1.1%)

11,811 (1.2%)
24 Maine
205,937
11
68,729 (33.4%)
9
66,826 (32.5%)
4
32,055 (15.6%)

24,294 (11.8%)

4,364 (2.1%)

2,826 (1.4%)

1,815 (0.9%)

5,028 (2.4%)
91 Massachusetts
1,418,180
45[g]
473,861 (33.4%)
30
376,990 (26.6%)
16
303,864 (21.4%)

166,200 (11.7%)

38,400 (2.7%)

17,297 (1.2%)

10,548 (0.7%)

31,020 (2.2%)
75 Minnesota
744,198
38
287,553 (38.6%)
27
222,431 (29.9%)
10
114,674 (15.4%)

61,882 (8.3%)

7,616 (1.0%)

41,530 (5.6%)

2,504 (0.3%)

6,008 (0.8%)
110 North Carolina
1,332,382
68
572,271 (43.0%)
37
322,645 (24.2%)
2
139,912 (10.5%)
3
172,558 (13.0%)

43,632 (3.3%)

30,742 (2.3%)

6,622 (0.5%)

44,000 (3.3%)
37 Oklahoma
304,281
21
117,633 (38.7%)
13
77,425 (25.5%)
1
40,732 (13.4%)
2
42,270 (13.9%)

5,115 (1.7%)

6,733 (2.2%)

5,109 (1.7%)

9,264 (3.0%)
64 Tennessee
516,250
36
215,390 (41.7%)
22
129,168 (25.0%)
1
53,732 (10.4%)
5
79,789 (15.5%)

17,102 (3.3%)

10,671 (2.1%)

2,278 (0.4%)

8,120 (1.6%)
228 Texas
2,094,428
113
725,562 (34.6%)
99
626,339 (29.9%)
5
239,237 (11.4%)
11
300,608 (14.4%)

82,671 (4.0%)

43,291 (2.1%)

8,688 (0.4%)

68,032 (3.2%)
29 Utah
220,582
7
40,674 (18.4%)
16
79,728 (36.1%)
3
35,727 (16.2%)
3
33,991 (15.4%)

18,734 (8.5%)

7,603 (3.5%)

1,704 (0.8%)

2,421 (1.1%)
16 Vermont
158,032
5
34,669 (21.9%)
11
79,921 (50.6%)

19,785 (12.5%)

14,828 (9.4%)

3,709 (2.4%)

1,991 (1.3%)

1,303 (0.8%)

1,826 (1.2%)
99 Virginia
1,323,693
67
705,501 (53.3%)
31
306,388 (23.2%)
1
142,546 (10.8%)

128,030 (9.7%)

11,199 (0.9%)

8,414 (0.6%)

11,288 (0.9%)

10,327 (0.8%)
March 3–10 13 Democrats Abroad
39,984
4
9,059 (22.7%)
9
23,139 (57.9%)

5,730 (14.3%)[h]

892 (2.2%)[i]

616 (1.5%)

224 (0.6%)

146 (0.4%)

178 (0.4%)
March 10
(352)
20 Idaho
108,649
12
53,151 (48.9%)
8
46,114 (42.4%)

2,878 (2.7%)

2,612 (2.4%)

1,426 (1.3%)

774 (0.7%)

876 (0.8%)

818 (0.8%)
125 Michigan
1,587,679
73
840,360 (52.9%)
52
576,926 (36.3%)

26,148 (1.7%)

73,464 (4.6%)

22,462 (1.4%)

11,018 (0.7%)

9,461 (0.6%)

27,840 (1.8%)
36 Mississippi
274,391
34
222,160 (81.0%)
2
40,657 (14.8%)

1,550 (0.6%)

6,933 (2.5%)

562 (0.2%)

440 (0.2%)

1,003 (0.4%)

1,086 (0.4%)
68 Missouri
666,112
44
400,347 (60.1%)
24
230,374 (34.6%)

8,156 (1.2%)

9,866 (1.5%)

3,309 (0.5%)

2,682 (0.4%)

4,887 (0.7%)

6,491 (1.0%)
14 North Dakota
14,413
6
5,742 (39.8%)
8
7,682 (53.3%)

366 (2.5%)

113 (0.8%)

164 (1.1%)

223 (1.5%)

89 (0.6%)

34 (0.2%)
89 Washington
1,558,776
46
591,403 (37.9%)
43
570,039 (36.6%)

142,652 (9.2%)

122,530 (7.9%)

63,344 (4.1%)

33,383 (2.1%)

13,199 (0.9%)

22,226 (1.4%)
March 14 6 Northern Mariana Islands
134
2
48 (36.4%)
4
84 (63.6%)

2 (1.5%)
March 17
(441)
67 Arizona
613,355
38
268,029 (43.7%)
29
200,456 (32.7%)

35,537 (5.8%)

[j]

24,868 (4.1%)

[j]

3,014 (0.5%)

81,451 (13.3%)[j]
219 Florida
1,739,214
162
1,077,375 (62.0%)
57
397,311 (22.8%)

32,875 (1.9%)

146,544 (8.4%)

39,886 (2.3%)

17,276 (1.0%)

8,712 (0.5%)

19,235 (1.1%)
155 Illinois
1,674,133
95
986,661 (59.0%)
60
605,701 (36.2%)

24,413 (1.5%)

25,500 (1.5%)

9,729 (0.6%)

9,642 (0.6%)

12,487 (0.7%)
April 7 84 Wisconsin
925,065
56
581,463 (62.9%)
28
293,441 (31.7%)

14,060 (1.5%)

8,846 (1.0%)

4,946 (0.5%)

6,079 (0.7%)

5,565 (0.6%)

10,665 (1.2%)
April 10 15 Alaska
19,589[k]
8
10,834 (55.3%)
7
8,755 (44.7%)
April 17 14 Wyoming
15,118[k]
10
10,912 (72.2%)
4
4,206 (27.8%)
April 28 136 Ohio
894,383
115
647,284 (72.4%)
21
149,683 (16.7%)

30,985 (3.5%)

28,704 (3.2%)

15,113 (1.7%)

11,899 (1.3%)

4,560 (0.5%)

6,155 (0.7%)
May 2 39 Kansas
143,183[k]
29
110,041 (76.9%)
10
33,142 (23.1%)
May 12 29 Nebraska
164,582
29
126,444 (76.8%)

23,214 (14.1%)

10,401 (6.3%)

4,523 (2.8%)
May 19 61 Oregon
618,711
46
408,315 (66.0%)
15
127,345 (20.6%)

59,355 (9.6%)

10,717 (1.7%)

12,979 (2.1%)
May 22 24 Hawaii
33,552[l]
16
21,215 (63.2%)
8
12,337 (36.8%)
June 2
(479)
20 District of Columbia
110,688
20
84,093 (76.0%)

11,116 (10.0%)

14,228 (12.9%)

442 (0.4%)

809 (0.7%)
82 Indiana
497,927
81
380,836 (76.5%)
1
67,688 (13.6%)

14,344 (2.9%)

4,783 (1.0%)

17,957 (3.6%)

3,860 (0.8%)

2,657 (0.5%)

5,802 (1.2%)
96 Maryland
1,050,773
96
879,753 (83.7%)

81,939 (7.8%)

27,134 (2.6%)

6,773 (0.6%)

7,180 (0.7%)

5,685 (0.5%)

4,226 (0.4%)

38,083 (3.6%)
19 Montana
149,973
18
111,706 (74.5%)
1
22,033 (14.7%)

11,984 (8.0%)

4,250 (2.8%)
34 New Mexico
247,880
30
181,700 (73.3%)
4
37,435 (15.1%)

14,552 (5.9%)

2,735 (1.1%)

11,458 (4.6%)
186 Pennsylvania
1,595,508
151
1,264,624 (79.3%)
35
287,834 (18.0%)

43,050 (2.7%)
26 Rhode Island
103,982
25
79,728 (76.7%)
1
15,525 (14.9%)

4,479 (4.3%)

651 (0.6%)

3,599 (3.5%)
16 South Dakota
52,661
13
40,800 (77.5%)
3
11,861 (22.5%)
June 6
(14)
7 Guam
388
5
270 (69.6%)
2
118 (30.4%)
7 U.S. Virgin Islands
550
7
502 (91.3%)

28 (5.1%)

20 (3.6%)
June 9
(133)
105 Georgia
1,086,729[m]
105
922,177 (84.9%)

101,668 (9.4%)

21,906 (2.0%)

7,657 (0.7%)

6,346 (0.6%)

4,317 (0.4%)

4,117 (0.4%)

18,541 (1.7%)
28 West Virginia
187,482
28
122,518 (65.3%)

22,793 (12.2%)

5,741 (3.1%)

3,759 (2.0%)

3,455 (1.8%)

3,011 (1.6%)

4,163 (2.2%)

22,042 (11.8%)
June 23
(328)
54 Kentucky
537,905
52
365,284 (67.9%)

65,055 (12.1%)

15,300 (2.8%)

9,127 (1.7%)

5,296 (1.0%)

5,859 (1.1%)
2[n]
71,984 (13.4%)
274 New York
1,759,039
231
1,136,679 (64.6%)
43
285,908 (16.3%)

82,917 (4.7%)

39,433 (2.2%)

22,927 (1.3%)

11,028 (0.6%)

9,083 (0.5%)

171,064 (9.7%)
July 7
(147)
21 Delaware
91,682
21
81,954 (89.4%)

6,878 (7.5%)

2,850 (3.1%)
126 New Jersey
958,762
121
814,188 (84.9%)
5
140,412 (14.7%)

4,162 (0.4%)
July 11 54 Louisiana
267,286
54
212,555 (79.5%)

19,859 (7.4%)

6,426 (2.4%)

4,312 (1.6%)

2,363 (0.9%)

2,431 (0.9%)

1,962 (0.7%)

17,378 (6.5%)
July 12 51 Puerto Rico
7,022
44
3,930 (56.0%)
5
932 (13.3%)

101 (1.4%)
2
894 (12.7%)

158 (2.3%)

31 (0.4%)

194 (2.8%)

782 (11.1%)
August 11 60 Connecticut
264,416
60
224,500 (84.9%)

30,512 (11.5%)





3,429 (1.3%)

5,975 (2.3%)
Total
3,979 pledged delegates
36,917,180 votes
2,716
19,080,153 (51.68%)
1,112
9,680,042 (26.22%)
67
2,831,566 (7.67%)
49
2,493,523 (6.75%)[j]
24
924,279 (2.50%)
7
529,722 (1.43%)[j]
2
273,977 (0.74%)
2
1,103,918 (2.99%)[j]

Election day postponements and cancellations

2020 Democratic presidential primary and caucus calendar.svg

  February   March 3 (Super Tuesday)   March 10   March 14–17   March 24–29   April 4–7   April 28   May   June

Calendar as of March 12, 2020
2020 Democratic presidential primary and caucus calendar rescheduled.svg

  February   March 3 (Super Tuesday)   March 10   March 14–17   April 7–17   April 28   May   June   July–August

Final calendar

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, a number of presidential primaries were rescheduled. On April 27, New York cancelled its primary altogether on the grounds that there was only one candidate left with an active campaign. Andrew Yang responded with a lawsuit, arguing that the decision infringes on voting rights,[54] and in early May, the judge ruled in favor of Yang.[55]

2020 Democratic primaries altered due to COVID-19.
Primary Original
schedule
Altered
schedule
Vote in
person?
Last
changed
Ref.
Ohio March 17 April 28[o] Cancelled March 25 [56][57]
Georgia March 24 June 9 Held April 9 [58][59]
Puerto Rico March 29 July 12 Held May 21 [60][61][62]
Alaska April 4 April 10[p] Cancelled March 23 [63]
Wyoming April 4 April 17[q] Cancelled March 22 [64]
Hawaii April 4 May 22[r] Cancelled March 27 [65][66][67]
Louisiana April 4 July 11[s] Held April 14 [68][69]
Maryland April 28 June 2 Held March 17 [70]
Pennsylvania April 28 June 2 Held March 27 [71]
Rhode Island April 28 June 2 Held March 23 [72]
New York April 28 June 23 Held April 27 [73][74][75]
Delaware April 28 July 7 Held May 7 [76][77]
Connecticut April 28 August 11 Held April 17 [78]
Kansas May 2 May 2[t] Cancelled March 30 [79]
Guam May 2 June 6 Held June 4 [80]
Indiana May 5 June 2 Held March 20 [81]
West Virginia May 12 June 9 Held April 1 [82]
Kentucky May 19 June 23 Held March 16 [83]
New Jersey June 2 July 7[u] Held April 8 [84]

In addition, the DNC elected to delay the 2020 Democratic National Convention from July 13–16 to August 17–20.[85]

Candidates

Major candidates in the 2020 Democratic presidential primaries had held significant elective office or received substantial media coverage.

Nearly 300 candidates who did not receive significant media coverage also filed with the Federal Election Commission to run for president in the primary.[86]

Nominee

Candidate Born Experience State Campaign announced Pledged delegates[87] Popular vote[88] Contests won Article Ref.

Joe Biden
November 20, 1942
(age 78)
Scranton, Pennsylvania
Vice President of the United States (2009–2017)
U.S. senator from Delaware (1973–2009)
Candidate for President in 1988 and 2008
Flag of Delaware.svg
Delaware
April 25, 2019 2,687 18,431,136
(51.48%)
46
(AL, AK, AZ, AR, CT, DE, DC, FL, GA, GU, HI, ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, MS, MO, MT, NE, NJ, NM, NY, NC, OH, OK, OR, PA, PR, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, VA, VI, WA, WV, WI, WY)
Joe Biden 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
__________
Campaign