5000 metres

Athletics
5000 metres
Osaka07 D6A M5000M Heat2-2.jpg
Runners in the 5000 metres at IAAF World Championships in Osaka 2007.
World records
Men  Joshua Cheptegei (UGA) 12:35.36 (2020)
Women  Letesenbet Gidey (ETH) 14:06.62 (2020)
Olympic records
Men  Kenenisa Bekele (ETH) 12:57.82 (2008)
Women  Vivian Cheruiyot (KEN) 14:26.17 (2016)
World Championship records
Men  Eliud Kipchoge (KEN) 12:52.79 (2003)
Women  Hellen Obiri (KEN) 14:26.72 (2019)

The 5000 metres or 5000-metre run is a common long-distance running event in track and field, approximately equivalent to 3 miles 188 yards or 16,404 feet 2 inches. It is one of the track events in the Olympic Games and the World Championships in Athletics, run over 12+12 laps of a standard track. The same distance in road running is called a 5K run; referring to the distance in metres rather than kilometres serves to disambiguate the two events. The 5000 m has been present on the Olympic programme since 1912 for men and since 1996 for women. Prior to 1996, women had competed in an Olympic 3000 metres race since 1984. The 5000 m has been held at each of the World Championships in Athletics in men's competition and since 1995 in women's.

The event is almost the same length as the dolichos race held at the Ancient Olympic Games, introduced in 720 BCE. While mainly run as an outdoor event, the 5000 m is sometimes run on an indoor track. World Athletics keeps official records for both outdoor and indoor 5000-metre track events.[1][2]

3 miles

The 5000 metres is the (slightly longer) approximate metric equivalent of the 3-mile (4,828.0 m) run, an event common in countries which used the imperial measurement system. The 3-mile event featured in the Commonwealth Games through 1966, and was a championship in the United States in non-Olympic years from 1953 to 1973. It required 12 laps around a 14-mile (402 m; 440 yd; 1,320 ft) track.

All-time top 25

Men

  • Correct as of July 2021.[3]
Ath.# Perf.# Time Athlete Nation Date Place Ref
1 1 12:35.36 Joshua Cheptegei  Uganda 14 AUG 2020 Monaco [4]
2 2 12:37.35 Kenenisa Bekele  Ethiopia 31 MAY 2004 Hengelo
3 3 12:39.36 Haile Gebrselassie  Ethiopia 13 JUN 1998 Helsinki
4 4 12:39.74 Daniel Komen  Kenya 22 AUG 1997 Brussels
5 12:40.18 Bekele #2 01 JUL 2005 Paris
6 12:41.86 Gebrselassie #2 13 AUG 1997 Zürich
5 7 12:43.02 Selemon Barega  Ethiopia 31 AUG 2018 Brussels [5]
8 12:44.39 Gebrselassie #3 16 AUG 1995 Zürich
9 12:44.90 Komen #2 13 AUG 1997 Zürich
10 12:45.09 Komen #3 14 AUG 1996 Zürich
6 11 12:45.82 Hagos Gebrhiwet  Ethiopia 31 AUG 2018 Brussels [5]
7 12 12:46.53 Eliud Kipchoge  Kenya 02 JUL 2004 Rome
8 13 12:46.79 Yomif Kejelcha  Ethiopia 31 AUG 2018 Brussels [5]
9 14 12:46.81 Dejen Gebremeskel  Ethiopia 06 JUL 2012 Paris [6]
10 15 12:47.04 Sileshi Sihine  Ethiopia 02 JUL 2004 Rome
11 16 12:47.20 Mohammed Ahmed  Canada 10 JUL 2020 Portland [7]
17 12:47.53 Gebrhiwet #2 06 JUL 2012 Paris [6]
18 12:48.09 Bekele #3 25 AUG 2006 Brussels
19 12:48.25 Bekele #4 18 AUG 2006 Zürich
12 20 12:48.45 Jakob Ingebrigtsen  Norway 10 JUN 2021 Florence [8]
13 21 12:48.63 Jacob Kiplimo  Uganda 08 SEP 2020 Ostrava [9]
14 22 12:48.64 Isaiah Kiplangat Koech  Kenya 06 JUL 2012 Paris [6]
15 23 12:48.66 Isaac Songok  Kenya 18 AUG 2006 Zürich
16 24 12:48.77 Yenew Alamirew  Ethiopia 06 JUL 2012 Paris [6]
17 25 12:48.81 Stephen Cherono  Kenya 12 JUN 2003 Ostrava
18 12:49.04 Thomas Pkemei Longosiwa  Kenya 06 JUL 2012 Paris
19 12:49.28 Brahim Lahlafi  Morocco 25 AUG 2000 Brussels
20 12:49.50 John Kipkoech  Kenya 06 JUL 2012 Paris [6]
21 12:49.71 Mohammed Mourhit  Belgium 25 AUG 2000 Brussels
22 12:49.87 Paul Tergat  Kenya 13 AUG 1997 Zürich
23 12:50.24 Hicham El Guerrouj  Morocco 12 JUN 2003 Ostrava
24 12:50.25 Abderrahim Goumri  Morocco 26 AUG 2005 Brussels
25 12:50.55 Moses Ndiema Masai  Kenya 01 JUN 2008 Berlin

Women

  • Correct as of July 2021.[10]
Ath.# Perf.# Time Athlete Nation Date Place Ref
1 1 14:06.62 Letesenbet Gidey  Ethiopia 07 OCT 2020 Valencia [11]
2 2 14:11.15 Tirunesh Dibaba  Ethiopia 06 JUN 2008 Oslo
3 3 14:12.59 Almaz Ayana  Ethiopia 02 JUN 2016 Rome [12]
4 4 14:12.88 Meseret Defar  Ethiopia 22 JUL 2008 Stockholm
5 5 14:13.32 Gudaf Tsegay  Ethiopia 08 JUN 2021 Hengelo [13]
6 6 14:14.09 Ejgayehu Taye  Ethiopia 08 JUN 2021 Hengelo [13]
7 14:14.32 Ayana #2 17 MAY 2015 Shanghai
7 8 14:15.24 Senbere Teferi  Ethiopia 08 JUN 2021 Hengelo [13]
8 9 14:15.41 Genzebe Dibaba  Ethiopia 04 JUL 2015 Paris [14]
10 14:16.31 Ayana #3 22 MAY 2016 Rabat
11 14:16.63 Defar #2 15 JUN 2007 Oslo
9 12 14:18.37 Hellen Obiri  Kenya 08 JUN 2017 Rome [15]
13 14:18.89 Ayana #4 09 SEP 2016 Brussels
14 14:19.76 G. Dibaba #2 30 MAY 2015 Eugene
15 14:20.36 Obiri #2 21 JUL 2019 London [16]
10 16 14:20.68 Agnes Jebet Tirop  Kenya 21 JUL 2019 London [16]
11 17 14:20.87 Vivian Cheruiyot  Kenya 29 JUL 2011 Stockholm
18 14:21.29 G. Dibaba #3 11 JUN 2015 Oslo
19 14:21.75 Obiri #3 13 JUL 2018 Rabat
20 14:21.97 Ayana #5 04 JUL 2015 Paris
12 21 14:22.12 Sifan Hassan  Netherlands 21 JUL 2019 London
21 14:22.12 Obiri #4 14 AUG 2020 Monaco [16]
23 14:22.34 Hassan #2 13 JUL 2018 Rabat
24 14:22.47 Obiri #5 13 MAY 2017 Shanghai
25 14:22.51 Cheruiyot #2 15 JUN 2007 Oslo
13 14:23.75 Liliya Shobukhova  Russia 19 JUL 2008 Kazan
14 14:23.92 Shelby Houlihan  United States 10 JUL 2020 Portland [17]
15 14:24.68 Elvan Abeylegesse  Turkey 11 JUN 2004 Bergen
16 14:25.34 Francine Niyonsaba  Burundi 03 SEP 2021 Brussels [18]
17 14:26.34 Karissa Schweizer  United States 10 JUL 2020 Portland [17]
18 14:26.76 Konstanze Klosterhalfen  Germany 03 AUG 2019 Berlin [19]
19 14:26.80 Fantu Worku  Ethiopia 01 JUL 2021 Oslo
20 14:27.12 Margaret Kipkemboi  Kenya 03 SEP 2021 Brussels [18]
21 14:27.55 Caroline Chepkoech Kipkirui  Kenya 01 SEP 2017 Brussels [20]
22 14:28.09 Jiang Bo  China 23 OCT 1997 Shanghai
23 14:28.39 Sentayehu Ejigu  Ethiopia 16 JUL 2010 Paris
24 14:28.55 Eilish McColgan  United Kingdom 01 JUL 2021 Oslo
25 14:29.11 Paula Radcliffe  United Kingdom 20 JUN 2004 Bydgoszcz

Olympic medalists

Men

Two men have won the Olympic 5000 metres on two occasions, both times back-to-back. Lasse Virén of Finland was the first to achieve the feat, winning the title in 1972 in Munich, before retaining the title in 1976 in Montreal. Mo Farah of Great Britain matched the achievement, winning the title in 2012 in London, and retaining it four years later in Rio de Janeiro. Both men achieved 5000 metre - 10,000 metre doubles on both occasions.

Finnish legend Paavo Nurmi is the only male runner to have won three Olympic medals at the distance, a gold and two silvers between 1920 and 1928.

Games Gold Silver Bronze
1912 Stockholm
details
Hannes Kolehmainen
 Finland
Jean Bouin
 France
George Hutson
 Great Britain
1920 Antwerp
details
Joseph Guillemot
 France
Paavo Nurmi
 Finland
Eric Backman
 Sweden
1924 Paris
details
Paavo Nurmi
 Finland
Ville Ritola
 Finland
Edvin Wide
 Sweden
1928 Amsterdam
details
Ville Ritola
 Finland
Paavo Nurmi
 Finland
Edvin Wide
 Sweden
1932 Los Angeles
details
Lauri Lehtinen
 Finland
Ralph Hill
 United States
Lauri Virtanen
 Finland
1936 Berlin
details
Gunnar Höckert
 Finland
Lauri Lehtinen
 Finland
Henry Jonsson
 Sweden
1948 London
details
Gaston Reiff
 Belgium
Emil Zátopek
 Czechoslovakia
Wim Slijkhuis
 Netherlands
1952 Helsinki
details
Emil Zátopek
 Czechoslovakia
Alain Mimoun
 France
Herbert Schade
 Germany
1956 Melbourne
details
Vladimir Kuts
 Soviet Union
Gordon Pirie
 Great Britain
Derek Ibbotson
 Great Britain
1960 Rome
details
Murray Halberg
 New Zealand
Hans Grodotzki
 United Team of Germany
Kazimierz Zimny
 Poland
1964 Tokyo
details
Bob Schul
 United States
Harald Norpoth
 United Team of Germany
Bill Dellinger
 United States
1968 Mexico City
details
Mohammed Gammoudi
 Tunisia
Kipchoge Keino
 Kenya
Naftali Temu
 Kenya
1972 Munich
details
Lasse Virén
 Finland
Mohammed Gammoudi
 Tunisia
Ian Stewart
 Great Britain
1976 Montreal
details
Lasse Virén
 Finland
Dick Quax
 New Zealand
Klaus-Peter Hildenbrand
 West Germany
1980 Moscow
details
Miruts Yifter
 Ethiopia
Suleiman Nyambui
 Tanzania
Kaarlo Maaninka
 Finland
1984 Los Angeles
details
Saïd Aouita
 Morocco
Markus Ryffel
 Switzerland
António Leitão
 Portugal
1988 Seoul
details
John Ngugi
 Kenya
Dieter Baumann
 West Germany
Hansjörg Kunze
 East Germany
1992 Barcelona
details
Dieter Baumann
 Germany
Paul Bitok
 Kenya
Fita Bayisa
 Ethiopia
1996 Atlanta
details
Vénuste Niyongabo
 Burundi
Paul Bitok
 Kenya
Khalid Boulami
 Morocco
2000 Sydney
details
Million Wolde
 Ethiopia
Ali Saïdi-Sief
 Algeria
Brahim Lahlafi
 Morocco
2004 Athens
details
Hicham El Guerrouj
 Morocco
Kenenisa Bekele
 Ethiopia
Eliud Kipchoge
 Kenya
2008 Beijing
details
Kenenisa Bekele
 Ethiopia
Eliud Kipchoge
 Kenya
Edwin Soi
 Kenya
2012 London
details
Mo Farah
 Great Britain
Dejen Gebremeskel
 Ethiopia
Thomas Pkemei Longosiwa
 Kenya
2016 Rio de Janeiro
details
Mo Farah
 Great Britain
Paul Kipkemoi Chelimo
 United States
Hagos Gebrhiwet
 Ethiopia
2020 Tokyo
details
Joshua Cheptegei
 Uganda
Mohammed Ahmed
 Canada
Paul Chelimo
 United States

Women

Only one woman has won the Olympic 5000 metres title twice, Ethiopian Meseret Defar winning in Athens in 2004, taking silver behind compatriot Tirunesh Dibaba in 2008, before regaining the title in London in 2012. Defar and Dibaba are the only athletes with three Olympic medals at the distance, with both reaching the podium in 2004, 2008 and 2012.

World Championship Medalists

Men

In the World Championships, Great Britain's Mo Farah stands alone, the most successful and most decorated athlete in the event with three gold medals (2011, 2013 and 2015) and four medals in total (including silver in 2017) between 2011 and 2017. Kenya's Ismael Kirui was the first athlete to win the title twice in 1993 and 1995, and Ethiopia's Muktar Edris the third between 2017 and 2019.

Championships Gold Silver Bronze
1983 Helsinki
details
 Eamonn Coghlan (IRL)  Werner Schildhauer (GDR)  Martti Vainio (FIN)
1987 Rome
details
 Saïd Aouita (MAR)  Domingos Castro (POR)  Jack Buckner (GBR)
1991 Tokyo
details
 Yobes Ondieki (KEN)  Fita Bayisa (ETH)  Brahim Boutayeb (MAR)
1993 Stuttgart
details
 Ismael Kirui (KEN)  Haile Gebrselassie (ETH)  Fita Bayisa (ETH)
1995 Gothenburg
details
 Ismael Kirui (KEN)  Khalid Boulami (MAR)  Shem Kororia (KEN)
1997 Athens
details
 Daniel Komen (KEN)  Khalid Boulami (MAR)  Tom Nyariki (KEN)
1999 Seville
details
 Salah Hissou (MAR)  Benjamin Limo (KEN)  Mohammed Mourhit (BEL)
2001 Edmonton
details
 Richard Limo (KEN)  Million Wolde (ETH)  John Kibowen (KEN)
2003 Saint-Denis
details
 Eliud Kipchoge (KEN)  Hicham El Guerrouj (MAR)  Kenenisa Bekele (ETH)
2005 Helsinki
details
 Benjamin Limo (KEN)  Sileshi Sihine (ETH)  Craig Mottram (AUS)
2007 Osaka
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 Bernard Lagat (USA)  Eliud Kipchoge (KEN)  Moses Kipsiro (UGA)
2009 Berlin
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 Kenenisa Bekele (ETH)  Bernard Lagat (USA)  James Kwalia C'Kurui (QAT)
2011 Daegu
details
 Mo Farah (GBR)  Bernard Lagat (USA)  Dejen Gebremeskel (ETH)
2013 Moscow
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 Mo Farah (GBR)  Hagos Gebrhiwet (ETH)  Isiah Koech (KEN)
2015 Beijing
details
 Mo Farah (GBR)  Caleb Ndiku (KEN)  Hagos Gebrhiwet (ETH)
2017 London
details
 Muktar Edris (ETH)  Mo Farah (GBR)  Paul Chelimo (USA)
2019 Doha
details
 Muktar Edris (ETH)  Selemon Barega (ETH)  Mohammed Ahmed (CAN)

Women

Romania's Gabriela Szabo won the title twice between 1995 and 1997. Since then four African runners - two Kenyan, two Ethiopian - have repeated the feat; Tirunesh Dibaba and Meseret Defar of Ethiopia and Vivian Cheruiyot and Hellen Obiri of Kenya. Meseret Defar's five medals - 2 gold, a silver and two bronze won between 2005 and 2013 - are the most won in the event by any athlete.


Season's bests

  • "i" indicates indoor performance.

See also

References

  1. ^ "– 5000 Metre Records – Outdoor". Iaaf.org. Retrieved 2013-07-25.
  2. ^ "– 5000 Metre Records – Indoor". Iaaf.org. Retrieved 2013-07-25.
  3. ^ "All-time men's best 5000 metres". alltime-athletics.com. 1 September 2018. Retrieved 5 September 2018.
  4. ^ "Cheptegei breaks world 5000m record in Monaco as Diamond League action returns". World Athletics. 14 August 2020. Retrieved 24 August 2020.
  5. ^ a b c "5000m Results" (PDF). sportresult.com. 31 August 2018. Retrieved 5 September 2018.
  6. ^ a b c d e "5000 Metres Results". IAAF. 6 July 2012. Retrieved 7 July 2012.
  7. ^ "Moh Ahmed Erupts For 12:47 5k, Fastest Ever On U.S. Soil". FloTrack. 11 July 2020. Retrieved 12 July 2020.
  8. ^ "European 5000m record of 12:48.45 for Ingebrigtsen in Florence". European Athletics. 10 June 2021. Retrieved 29 June 2021.
  9. ^ Bob Ramsak (8 September 2020). "Kiplimo, Crouser, Kipyegon and Taylor impress in Ostrava". World Athletics. Retrieved 10 September 2020.
  10. ^ "All-time women's best 5000 metres". alltime-athletics.com. 14 July 2018. Retrieved 23 July 2018.
  11. ^ Phil Minshull (7 October 2020). "Cheptegei and Gidey break world records in Valencia". World Athletics. Retrieved 13 October 2020.
  12. ^ "5000m Results" (PDF). sportresult.com. 2 June 2016. Retrieved 3 June 2016.
  13. ^ a b c Hannah Borenstein (8 June 2021). "Gidey breaks 10,000m world record in Hengelo". World Athletics. Retrieved 29 June 2021.
  14. ^ "IAAF Diamond League Paris 2015 - 5000m W Results". IAAF. 4 July 2015. Retrieved 5 July 2015.
  15. ^ "5000m Results" (PDF). sportresult.com. 8 June 2017. Retrieved 8 June 2017.
  16. ^ a b c Bob Ramsak (21 July 2019). "Obiri and Fraser-Pryce shine in London - IAAF Diamond League". IAAF. Retrieved 31 July 2019.
  17. ^ a b Jon Mulkeen (12 July 2020). "Ahmed and Houlihan smash North American 5000m records, Fraser-Pryce clocks 11.00". World Athletics. Retrieved 12 July 2020.
  18. ^ a b "5000m Result" (PDF). sportresult.com. 3 September 2021. Retrieved 14 September 2021.
  19. ^ Germany, Süddeutsche de GmbH, Munich (3 August 2019). "Klosterhalfen stellt deutschen Rekord über 5000 Meter auf". Süddeutsche.de (in German). Retrieved 3 August 2019.
  20. ^ "5000m Results" (PDF). sportresult.com. 1 September 2017. Retrieved 2 September 2017.

External links

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