Avignon Cathedral

Detail of a drawing by Étienne Martellange dating from the first quarter of the 17th century. The cathedral is at the top left, beyond the Palais des Papes.

Avignon Cathedral (French: Cathédrale Notre-Dame des Doms d'Avignon) is a Roman Catholic church located next to the Palais des Papes in Avignon, France. The cathedral is the seat of the Archbishop of Avignon.

The cathedral is a Romanesque building, constructed primarily in the second half of the 12th century.[1] The bell tower collapsed in 1405 and was rebuilt in 1425. In 1670–1672 the apse was rebuilt and extended.[2]

The building was abandoned and allowed to deteriorate during the Revolution, but it was reconsecrated in 1822 and restored by the archbishop Célestin Dupont in 1835–1842.[3] The most prominent feature of the cathedral is a gilded statue of the Virgin Mary atop the bell tower which was erected in 1859.[3] The interior contains many works of art. The most famous of these is the mausoleum of Pope John XXII (died 1334), a 14th-century Gothic edifice. It was moved in 1759, damaged during the Revolution, and restored to its original position in 1840.[4] The cathedral was listed as a Monument historique in 1840.[5]

References

  1. ^ Girard 1958, p. 162.
  2. ^ Girard 1958, pp. 163, 166.
  3. ^ a b Girard 1958, p. 163.
  4. ^ Girard 1958, p. 165.
  5. ^ "Cathédrale Notre-Dame-des-Doms". Ministère de la Culture, Mérimée. Retrieved 8 August 2014.

Sources

  • Girard, Joseph (1958). Évocation du Vieil Avignon (in French). Paris: Les Éditions de Minuit. OCLC 5391399.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)

Further reading

External links

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