Bruce Stuart

Bruce Stuart
Hockey Hall of Fame, 1961
Bruce Stuart, Portage Lakes.jpg
Bruce Stuart with the Portage Lakes Hockey Club in the 1905–06 season.
Born (1881-11-30)November 30, 1881
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Died October 28, 1961(1961-10-28) (aged 79)
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Height 6 ft 2 in (188 cm)
Weight 180 lb (82 kg; 12 st 12 lb)
Position Centre
Shot Left
Played for Quebec Bulldogs
Ottawa Senators
Montreal Wanderers
Portage Lakes Hockey Club
Pittsburgh Victorias
Playing career 1898–1911

Charles Bruce Stuart (November 30, 1881 – October 28, 1961) was a Canadian amateur and professional ice hockey forward who played for the Quebec Bulldogs, Ottawa Senators, Montreal Wanderers, Portage Lakes Hockey Club, Pittsburgh Victorias and Pittsburgh Professionals from 1899 to 1911. Stuart is considered to be an early version of a power forward, a forward who combines size and physical play with scoring ability, in hockey history.

Stuart won the Stanley Cup with both the Ottawa Senators and the Montreal Wanderers.

Playing career

Stuart on a hockey card with the Ottawa Senators.

Bruce and his older brother Hod played for Ottawa Hockey Club (Senators) in the Canadian Amateur Hockey League (CAHL) in 1899, in their home city of Ottawa. In 1900, they moved to Quebec City for business. They started playing hockey again in 1901, joining the Quebec Bulldogs in the CAHL. He then played professionally with the Pittsburgh Victorias in the Western Pennsylvania Hockey League (WPHL) in 1902–03 and in Houghton, with the Portage Lakes Hockey Club, in the old International Professional Hockey League (IPHL) between 1904–1907. With Portage Lakes Hockey Club he won two league titles in 1905–06 & 1906–07 as a teammate of Cyclone Taylor.

Stuart joined the Montreal Wanderers for the 1907–08 season in time to win the Stanley Cup in 1908, and then captained the Ottawa Senators in 1909 to the Stanley Cup.

Bruce Stuart's brother Hod, a defenseman who was considered one of the better hockey players in Canada at the time, died in a diving accident in the Bay of Quinte near Belleville, Ontario on June 23, 1907 at an age of 28. At the time of the accident the two brothers had not seen each other for over a year, as they had been playing in different cities.[1]

In 1910, when the National Hockey Association (NHA) imposed a salary cap, cutting player's salaries in half, Stuart attempted to form a rival league.[2] The rival league failed to organize, as the Montreal Arena was refused to the players.[3] Stuart returned to captain the Senators to the 1911 Stanley Cup.

Playing style

Bruce Stuart, a centre forward position wise, was a tall player for his era measuring 6 feet and 2 inches, and weighing around 180 pounds. When Stuart replaced Ernie Russell at the centre forward position on the Montreal Wanderers in March 1908 the Ottawa Citizen recognized that while he "is not as tricky a scorer as Russell" he was thought "to be a better man carrying the disc through a defense", and the newspaper also recognized that he still had good shot.[4] He also played occasionally at other forward positions, including rover and left wing.[5]

Stuart employed a physical playing style along to his size, which earned him a fair share of injuries throughout his hockey career. During the 1910 NHA season Stuart suffered a broken left collarbone in game against the Renfrew Creamery Kings on February 12, after a scuffle with Hay Millar and a subsequent collision with Frank Patrick.[6] The injury held him out for the remainder of the 1910 season and significantly weakened the Senators in their quest on defending the Stanley Cup against the Montreal Wanderers. Stuart had also, on different occasions during his hockey career, both of his knees dislocated, three ribs broken, his nose smashed twice, a bone in his right foot splintered, several teeth knocked out and his right hand fractured.[7]

In the local Ottawa newspapers Stuart was often praised for his leadership qualities. During the 1910 season, when he captained the Ottawa Senators in the NHA, the Ottawa Journal claimed him "unanimously conceded to be the greatest hockey general that ever wore skates" and that he had "complete control over his men from the minute the game starts". The newspaper also noted him to be a clutch scorer and claimed that he had "scored more goals, at critical moments, when his team was behind, than any other forward in the game".[8]

Post career

Stuart retired from playing after the 1910–11 season and managed a shoe store he owned in Ottawa until 1952 along with some coaching. The shoe store, located at 275 Bank Street in Ottawa, outside of shoes and boots also sold skates.[9]

After his player career Stuart took to golf and curling for recreation. As a golf player he was a member of the Ottawa Hunt and Golf Club. As a curling player he was active with the Ottawa Curling Club, and he donated a trophy to the club for competition.[5]

Despite his age, he attended his induction into the Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto in 1961.[10] He died not long after.[5]

Statistics

Exh. = Exhibition games

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1899 Ottawa Hockey Club CAHL 1 1 0 1 – – – – – –
1900 Ottawa Hockey Club CAHL 5 11 0 11 – – – – – –
1901 Quebec Bulldogs CAHL 6 5 0 5 – – – – – –
1902 Ottawa Hockey Club CAHL 8 9 0 9 – – – – – –
1902–03 Pittsburgh Victorias WPHL 10 16 6 22 20 – – – – –
1903–04 Portage Lakes Hockey Club Exh. 14 44 0 44 6 9 28 0 28 13
1904–05 Portage Lakes Hockey Club IPHL 22 33 0 33 59 – – – – –
1905–06 Portage Lakes Hockey Club IPHL 20 15 0 15 22 – – – – –
1906–07 Portage Lakes Hockey Club IPHL 23 20 9 29 81 – – – – –
1907–08* Montreal Wanderers ECAHA 3 3 0 3 18 – – – – –
Montreal Wanderers Stanley Cup 3 8 0 8 18
1909* Ottawa Senators ECHA 11 22 0 22 30 – – – – –
1909–10 Ottawa Senators CHA 2 4 0 4 0 – – – – –
1910* Ottawa Senators NHA 7 14 0 14 17 – – – – –
Ottawa Senators Stanley Cup 4 10 0 10 6
1910–11* Ottawa Senators NHA 3 0 0 0 0 – – – – –
CAHL totalt 20 26 0 26 – – – – – –
IPHL totalt 65 68 9 77 162 – – – – –
ECAHA + ECHA totals 14 25 0 25 48 – – – – –
NHA totals 10 14 0 14 17 – – – – –
Stanley Cup totals 7 18 0 18 24

* Stanley Cup Champion.

Achievements

References

Bibliography

Podnieks, Andrew (2003). Players: The ultimate A-Z guide of everyone who has ever played in the NHL. Doubleday Canada. ISBN 0-385-25999-9.

Notes

  1. ^ "Hod Stuart met instant death" Ottawa Citizen. June 24, 1907 (pg. 2). Retrieved 2021-03-17.
  2. ^ "Bomb in Ottawa Camp". The Globe. November 24, 1910. p. 10.
  3. ^ "Outlaws Hurrying to Cover". The Globe. December 14, 1910. p. 10.
  4. ^ "Who Wanderers Are" Ottawa Citizen. March 21, 1908 (pg. 17). Retrieved 2021-03-17.
  5. ^ a b c "Bruce Stuart, Former Hockey Great, Dies" Ottawa Citizen. Oct. 30, 1961 (pg. 12). Retrieved 2021-03-17.
  6. ^ "Bruce Stuart badly injured" Ottawa Citizen. Feb. 14, 1910 (pg. 9). Retrieved 2021-03-17.
  7. ^ "Confidence main thing in sport – Stuarts' secret of success" Ottawa Citizen. Apr. 1, 1910 (pg. 8). Retrieved 2021-03-17.
  8. ^ "Ottawa captain in bad shape, laid up for rest of season" Ottawa Journal. February 10, 1915 (pg. 4). Retrieved 2021-03-21.
  9. ^ Stuart's Opening – Splendid Boot and Shoe Business at 275 Bank St. Ottawa Citizen. Dec. 10, 1909 (pg. 9). Retrieved 2021-03-17.
  10. ^ "Former Ottawa Players Bruce Stuart And Percy LeSueur in Hall of Fame". Ottawa Journal. June 14, 1961. Retrieved January 1, 2021 – via newspapers.com.

External links

Copyright