Carl Liscombe

Carl Liscombe
Born (1915-05-17)May 17, 1915
Perth, Ontario, Canada
Died February 23, 2004(2004-02-23) (aged 88)
Wailuku, Hawaii, U.S.
Height 5 ft 8 in (173 cm)
Weight 175 lb (79 kg; 12 st 7 lb)
Position Left Wing
Shot Left
Played for Detroit Red Wings
Playing career 1935–1954

Harold Carlyle Liscombe (May 17, 1915 – February 23, 2004[1]) was a Canadian ice hockey player. He was a Stanley Cup winner with the Detroit Red Wings in 1943 and a Calder Cup winner with the Providence Reds in 1949. He was the last surviving member of Red Wings 1943 Stanley Cup team.

Playing career

Liscombe was a key member of the 1943 Stanley Cup champions.[2] After scoring 42 points during the regular season, he tied a league record with 14 points in the playoffs. He scored the last goal of the 1943 Stanley Cup Final.

After co-leading the NHL across two playoff seasons with 26 points (12 points in 1942[3] and 14 points in 1943[4]), Liscombe scored a career-high 73 points in 50 games during the 1943-44 regular season (fourth-best in the league scoring race).

Liscombe shares the team record for most goals in a playoff game and most points in a game.

Liscombe was also a star in the American Hockey League, notably becoming the first back-to-back winner of the Les Cunningham Award as the league's Most Valuable Player. In 1949, Liscombe helped the Providence Reds win the Calder Cup.

Liscombe died of complications from leukemia.

Awards and achievements

Was winner of two AHL most valuable player awards;[5]

References

  1. ^ "Carl 'Lefty' Liscombe". cambridgeshf.com. Retrieved 1 February 2019.
  2. ^ Bill King (April 9, 1943). "Stanley Cup to Detroit as sweep is complete". Google. Retrieved August 25, 2018.
  3. ^ NHL. "1941-42 playoff scoring leaders". NHL. Retrieved August 25, 2018.
  4. ^ NHL. "1942-43 playoff scoring leaders". NHL. Retrieved August 25, 2018.
  5. ^ AHL hall of fame. "Les Cunningham award". database. AHL. Archived from the original on 1 August 2010. Retrieved 8 August 2010.

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