Daieishō Hayato

大栄翔 勇人
Daieishō Hayato
Daieisho 2014.JPG
Daieishō in 2014
Personal information
Born Hayato Takanishi
(1993-11-10) November 10, 1993 (age 27)
Asaka, Saitama Prefecture
Height 1.82 m (5 ft 11 12 in)
Weight 161 kg (355 lb)
Career
Stable Oitekaze
Current rank see below
Debut January, 2012
Highest rank sekiwake (September 2020)
Championships 1 (Jonokuchi)
1 (Sandanme)
1 (Jūryō)
Special Prizes 2 (Outstanding Performance)
Gold Stars 2 (Kakuryū, Hakuho)
* Up to date as of November 22, 2020.

Daieishō Hayato (Japanese: 大栄翔 勇人, born November 10, 1993 as Hayato Takanishi (高西 勇人)) is a Japanese professional sumo wrestler. He began his professional career in 2012 at the age of eighteen and reached the top makuuchi division in September 2015. His highest rank to date has been sekiwake. He has two gold stars for defeating yokozuna and two special prize for Outstanding Performance. He wrestles for the Oitekaze stable.

Early life and education

Hayato Takanishi was born on 10 November 1993 in Asaka, a city in Saitama Prefecture. He started sumo after winning a local tournament during his first year in elementary school. He attended Saitama Sakae High School [ja], a school famous for its sumo club, and earned a place in the club's first team near the end of his second year. In his final year he contributed to the school finishing in second place in the team competition at national championships. After graduation he joined Oitekaze stable to pursue a professional sumo career.[1]

Career

Early career

Takanishi Hayato entered sumo under his birth name but adopted the ring name Daishoei for his first competitive tournament. He won the jonokuchi division with a 7–0 record in March 2012 and a 6–1 record in jonidan in May saw him promoted to sandanme where he recorded four wins in July. He then modified his ring name slightly and became Daieishō. After winning records in the next two tournaments he was promoted to makushita but struggled in higher division and was relegated back to sandanme. A perfect 7–0 in May 2013 saw him take the divisional championship and secure a return to makushita. After three consecutive winning records (kachi-koshi) Daieishō was promoted to the second highest jūryō division for the July 2014 tournament, the 14th former student of Saitama Sakae's coach Michinori Yamada to reach the rank.[1] After performing consistently in jūryō for a year he earned promotion to the top division (makuuchi) with a 9–6 record in July 2015.[2]

Makuuchi career

In September 2015 Daieishō made his makuuchi debut at the rank of maegashira 13. He was the youngest man in the division at 21 years old.[3] He won seven of his first fourteen bouts, including an upset victory over Takarafuji but a final day defeat against Takekaze saw him end the tournament with a 7–8 losing record (make-koshi). In November he recorded only six wins and was demoted to jūryō but returned to the top division after an 8–7 record in January 2016. In March 2016 Daieishō produced a career-best effort, recording ten wins including victories over Ichinojō and Takekaze to place him in a tie for seventh place. In May, at career-high rank of maegashira 9 he stood at 6–4 after ten days but then slumped to five consecutive defeats. He struggled again in July, recording only five wins and dropped to maegashira 16 for September.[2] His seven tournament run in the top division ended after a 5–10 record saw him relegated to jūryō for the November tournament but he responded with eight wins to put himself back in contention for promotion.

In January 2017 he won the jūryō division with a 12–3 record to secure his promotion back to makuuchi. He produced his best result in the top division to date in the March 2017 tournament, winning his last eight bouts in a row to finish on 11–4. This saw him promoted to his highest rank to date of maegashira 3 for the May tournament. Facing all the yokozuna and ōzeki for the first time, he followed his eight consecutive wins in March with eight losses in his first eight bouts in May and finished with a 4–11 record. After falling to maegashira 13 with a poor 5–10 score in November 2017, he recovered somewhat to post consecutive 9–6 records in the January and March tournaments of 2018.

He reached maegashira 2 in March 2019, and remained near the top of the maegashira ranks in the next few tournaments. In September he earned his first kinboshi with a defeat of Kakuryū, his first win over a yokozuna in eleven attempts.[4] He attained a career highest rank of maegashira 1 in the November 2019 tournament, and earned his career kinboshi on Day 2 with a first win over Hakuhō in five attempts.[5] Hakuhō went on to win the tournament and as the only man to defeat him, Daieisho received the Outstanding Performance Prize.[6] He made his debut at the komusubi rank in January 2020, narrowly failing to secure a majority of wins, finishing on 7–8. He returned to komusubi in July 2020, where he defeated Hakuhō again,[7] won his last six bouts to finish on 11–4 and won his second Outstanding Performance Prize.[8]

He was promoted to sekiwake for the September 2020 tournament, the first sekiwake from Saitama Prefecture since Wakachichibu in July 1963.[9]

Fighting style

Daieishō is a tsuki and oshi specialist, which means he relies on thrusting and pushing techniques to defeat his opponents rather than belt-wrestling. By far the most common of his winning techniques is oshidashi which accounts for 55% of his wins.[10] Although he also used belt gripping techniques during his high school career, he has focused on pushing and thrusting since turning professional. In an interview upon the announcement of his promotion to Juryo in May 2014, Daieishō was quoted as saying he wanted to thrust like former ōzeki Chiyotaikai.[1]

Career record

Daieishō Hayato [2]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
2012 (Maezumo) West Jonokuchi #13
7–0
Champion

 
East Jonidan #12
6–1
 
East Sandanme #49
4–3
 
East Sandanme #34
5–2
 
East Sandanme #8
6–1
 
2013 East Makushita #33
2–5
 
East Makushita #49
3–4
 
West Sandanme #7
7–0
Champion

 
West Makushita #11
3–4
 
West Makushita #17
5–2
 
West Makushita #8
3–4
 
2014 West Makushita #13
5–2
 
West Makushita #7
5–2
 
East Makushita #2
6–1
 
West Jūryō #12
8–7
 
East Jūryō #9
6–9
 
West Jūryō #11
6–9
 
2015 East Jūryō #13
10–5
 
East Jūryō #6
7–8
 
East Jūryō #7
10–5
 
West Jūryō #1
9–6
 
East Maegashira #13
7–8
 
East Maegashira #14
6–9
 
2016 East Jūryō #3
8–7
 
West Maegashira #14
10–5
 
West Maegashira #9
6–9
 
West Maegashira #11
5–10
 
East Maegashira #16
5–10
 
West Jūryō #4
8–7
 
2017 West Jūryō #2
12–3
Champion

 
East Maegashira #11
11–4
 
East Maegashira #3
4–11
 
West Maegashira #7
5–10
 
East Maegashira #11
8–7
 
West Maegashira #9
5–10
 
2018 West Maegashira #13
9–6
 
West Maegashira #8
9–6
 
East Maegashira #3
5–10
 
West Maegashira #7
6–9
 
West Maegashira #10
8–7
 
West Maegashira #9
9–6
 
2019 West Maegashira #7
9–6
 
East Maegashira #2
7–8
 
West Maegashira #2
7–8
 
West Maegashira #3
8–7
 
East Maegashira #3
8–7
East Maegashira #1
8–7
O
2020 West Komusubi #1
7–8
 
East Maegashira #1
8–7
 
East Komusubi #1
Tournament Cancelled
0–0–0
East Komusubi #1
11–4
O
East Sekiwake #2
5–10
 
West Maegashira #2
10–5
 
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Suzuki, Satoru (29 May 2014). "大栄翔が新十両昇進 3歳年上弟弟子・遠藤"刺激"に躍進" [Daieisho promoted to Juryo, 3-years' senior Endo's progression "stimulating"]. Sponichi (in Japanese). Sports Nippon Newspapers. Archived from the original on 11 September 2016. Retrieved 31 August 2016.
  2. ^ a b c "Daieishō Hayato Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 23 May 2013.
  3. ^ "Hakuho crashes to stunning opening defeat at Autumn basho". Japan Times. 13 September 2015. Retrieved 27 March 2017.
  4. ^ "Sumo: Okinoumi sweeps into sole lead on Day 6". The Mainichi. 13 September 2019. Retrieved 13 September 2019.
  5. ^ "Sumo: Hakuho upset on Day 2 of Kyushu meet as title chase blows open". The Mainchi. 11 November 2019. Retrieved 12 November 2019.
  6. ^ "Sumo: Hakuho puts final winning touch on 43rd championship". The Mainichi. 24 November 2019. Retrieved 25 November 2019.
  7. ^ "Hakuho loses sole possession of lead after being upset by Daieisho on Day 11 of July Basho". Japan Times. 29 July 2020. Retrieved 4 August 2020.
  8. ^ "Terunofuji caps dramatic comeback with second title". Japan Times. 2 August 2020. Retrieved 4 August 2020.
  9. ^ "2020 September Grand Sumo Tournament Banzuke Topics". Japan Sumo Association. Archived from the original on 29 September 2020. Retrieved 3 September 2020.
  10. ^ "日本相撲協会公式サイト". sumo.or.jp.

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