David Jenkins (figure skater)

David Jenkins
David Jenkins 1956.jpg
David Jenkins at the 1956 Olympics
Personal information
Country represented United States
Born (1936-06-29) June 29, 1936 (age 84)
Akron, Ohio, U.S.
Skating club Broadmoor SC
Retired 1960

David Wilkinson Jenkins (born June 29, 1936) is an American former figure skater. He is the 1960 Olympic champion, the 1956 Olympic bronze medalist, a three-time World champion, and a four-time U.S. national champion.

Personal life

Jenkins was born on June 29, 1936, in Akron, Ohio.[1] He is the younger brother of Hayes Alan Jenkins.[2]

He studied at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine during his competitive career.[3] He took a leave of absence during his time with Ice Follies.[4] After graduating in 1963, he became a practicing physician.[1][5]

Skating career

Jenkins won his first senior national medal, silver, at the 1954 U.S. Championships. His first world medal, bronze, came at the 1955 World Championships. He received the bronze medal at the 1956 Winter Olympics while his brother won the gold.[1]

The brothers received financial support from the Broadmoor Hotel in Colorado Springs, Colorado, and a foundation.[2]

In 1957, David Jenkins became the U.S. national champion and won the first of his three consecutive world titles. He performed a triple Axel jump in a 1957 exhibition, 21 years before that jump was landed for the first time in competition.[3]

After taking his fourth consecutive national title,[6] he won the gold medal at the 1960 Winter Olympics.[1] Edi Scholdan served as his coach.[3]

Following the 1960 Olympics, Jenkins declined to compete at the 1960 World Figure Skating Championships and turned professional, joining the Ice Follies.[4]

Competitive highlights

International
Event 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960
Winter Olympics 3rd 1st
World Championships 4th 3rd 3rd 1st 1st 1st
North American Champ. 2nd 1st
National
U.S. Championships 2nd 2nd 3rd 1st 1st 1st 1st

References

  1. ^ a b c d "David Jenkins". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on October 22, 2017.
  2. ^ a b Elliott, Helene (January 7, 2002). "In Long Run, Little Things Remain". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on November 18, 2017. Retrieved November 12, 2017.
  3. ^ a b c Warsinskey, Tim (February 18, 2010). "Akron native David Jenkins still feels urge to compete, 50 years after winning gold". The Plain Dealer. cleveland.com. Archived from the original on September 24, 2015.
  4. ^ a b "News About Skaters", Skating magazine, November 1960
  5. ^ "Notable Alumni". Case Western Reserve University. Archived from the original on October 21, 2017. Retrieved November 12, 2017.
  6. ^ "Past U.S. Champions – Senior" (PDF). Archived from the original on February 9, 2012.CS1 maint: unfit url (link)

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