Eddie Carpenter

Eddie Carpenter
Eddie Carpenter.jpg
Born (1887-06-15)June 15, 1887
Hartford, Michigan, USA
Died April 30, 1963(1963-04-30) (aged 75)
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Height 6 ft 0 in (183 cm)
Weight 170 lb (77 kg; 12 st 2 lb)
Position Defence
Shot Right
Played for Port Arthur Thunderbays (NOHL)
Port Arthur Lake City (NOHL)
Moncton Victorias (MPHL)
New Glasgow Black Foxes (MPHL)
Toronto Blueshirts (NHA)
Seattle Metropolitans (PCHA)
Quebec Bulldogs (NHL)
Hamilton Tigers (NHL)
Playing career 1909–1921
Carpenter, third from right in the middle row, with the Moncton Victorias in 1912–13.

Everard Lorne Carpenter (June 15, 1887 – April 30, 1963) was a Canadian ice hockey player. He played in the Maritime Professional Hockey League (MPHL), National Hockey Association (NHA), National Hockey League (NHL) and Pacific Coast Hockey Association (PCHA) in a career that lasted from 1909 to 1921. With the Seattle Metropolitans of the PCHA he won the Stanley Cup in 1917, and played for the Cup in 1911 with Port Arthur. He moved to the NHA in 1914, playing one season with the Toronto Blueshirts, before moving west and spending two seasons with Seattle. He joined the Quebec Bulldogs of the NHL in 1919, and moved with the team when they became the Hamilton Tigers in 1920, playing one season before retiring.

Career

Although born in Hartford, Michigan, Carpenter grew up in the Lachute-Brownsburg, Quebec, area where his parents lived until they moved to Red Deer, Alberta, in 1913.

Carpenter moved to Port Arthur, Ontario, in 1909 to work for the Canadian Northern Railway. He played the defensive position of cover point with the semi-professional Thunder Bay Hockey Club in 1910, then during the hockey seasons of 1910–11 and 1911–12 for the Port Arthur Hockey Club. The team (which included Jack Walker) defeated Prince Albert for the Western Canadian championship, then went on to play the Ottawa Senators on March 16, 1911, for the Stanley Cup; they were defeated by the NHA team. He played with the Moncton Victorias in the 1912–13 season and the New Glasgow Black Foxes in 1913–14. He then joined the Stanley Cup champion Toronto Blueshirts of the NHA for one season. He left the Blueshirts and joined the new Seattle Metropolitans, where the team won the Stanley Cup in 1917. Carpenter returned for one season in Port Arthur before serving in World War I. He returned from the war in 1919 and joined the Quebec Bulldogs of the NHL, following the club to Hamilton the next season, where it was known as the Hamilton Tigers.

After retiring from professional hockey in 1921, Carpenter became the trainer, coach and manager for the Port Arthur Hockey Club which won two Allan Cups in 1924–25 and 1925–26. He served as councillor of the city of Port Arthur in 1941. About 1945, he moved to Winnipeg, and in approximately 1954, he retired from his job as a locomotive engineer, having worked for the Canadian National Railways. He died, aged 75, in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Career statistics

Regular season and playoffs

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1909–10 Port Arthur Thunder Bays NOHL 13 2 0 2 51 β€” β€” β€” β€” β€”
1910–11 Port Arthur Lake City NOHL 14 6 0 6 54 2 0 0 0 18
1910–11 Port Arthur Lake City St-Cup β€” β€” β€” β€” β€” 1 1 0 1 0
1911–12 Port Arthur Lake City NOHL 15 2 0 2 39 2 0 0 0 3
1912–13 Moncton Victorias MPHL 14 6 0 6 17 β€” β€” β€” β€” β€”
1913–14 New Glasgow Black Foxes MPHL 19 8 0 8 37 2 0 0 0 7
1914–15 Toronto Blueshirts NHA 19 1 0 1 63 β€” β€” β€” β€” β€”
1915–16 Seattle Metropolitans PCHA 18 6 4 10 17 β€” β€” β€” β€” β€”
1916–17 Seattle Metropolitans PCHA 24 5 3 8 19 β€” β€” β€” β€” β€”
1916–17 Seattle Metropolitans St-Cup β€” β€” β€” β€” β€” 4 0 0 0 3
1919–20 Quebec Bulldogs NHL 24 8 4 12 24 β€” β€” β€” β€” β€”
1920–21 Hamilton Tigers NHL 21 2 1 3 17 β€” β€” β€” β€” β€”
NHA totals 19 1 0 1 63 β€” β€” β€” β€” β€”
NHL totals 45 10 5 15 41 β€” β€” β€” β€” β€”

Source: NHL[1]

References

  1. ^ "Ed Carpenter Stats and News". NHL. Retrieved April 23, 2020.
General
  • "Everard Lorne (Eddie) Carpenter", in F.B. Scollie, Thunder Bay Mayors and Councillors 1873–1945 (Thunder Bay Historical Museum Society, 2000), p. 62–63.

External links

Copyright