Eurovision Song Contest 1995

Eurovision Song Contest 1995
ESC 1995 logo.svg
Dates
Final 13 May 1995
Host
Venue Point Theatre,
Dublin, Ireland
Presenter(s) Mary Kennedy
Musical director Noel Kelehan
Directed by John Comiskey
Executive supervisor Christian Clausen
Executive producer John McHugh
Host broadcaster Raidió Teilifís Éireann (RTÉ)
Opening act Video montage commemorating the history of the Eurovision Song Contest for its 40th edition.
Interval act "Lumen", composed by Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin, and performed by Súilleabháin on piano, and a number of artists including Clannad, Brian Kennedy and The Monks of Glenstal Abbey, with the RTÉ Concert Orchestra, conducted by Proinnsías Ó Duinn
Website eurovision.tv/event/dublin-1995 Edit this at Wikidata
Participants
Number of entries 23
Debuting countries None
Returning countries  Belgium
 Denmark
 Israel
 Slovenia
 Turkey
Non-returning countries  Estonia
 Finland
 Lithuania
 Netherlands
 Romania
 Slovakia
  Switzerland
  • Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Italy in the Eurovision Song ContestNetherlands in the Eurovision Song ContestSwitzerland in the Eurovision Song ContestGermany in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Monaco in the Eurovision Song ContestLuxembourg in the Eurovision Song ContestSpain in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Denmark in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Finland in the Eurovision Song ContestNorway in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Portugal in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Israel in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Greece in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Malta in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Austria in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995France in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Turkey in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Yugoslavia in the Eurovision Song ContestMorocco in the Eurovision Song ContestCyprus in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Bosnia and Herzegovina in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Croatia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Slovenia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Estonia in the Eurovision Song ContestSlovakia in the Eurovision Song ContestHungary in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Romania in the Eurovision Song ContestLithuania in the Eurovision Song ContestPoland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995Russia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1995 A coloured map of the countries of Europe
    About this image
         Participating countries     Countries that participated in the past but not in 1995
Vote
Voting system Each country awarded 12, 10, 8-1 point(s) to their 10 favourite songs
Nul points None
Winning song  Norway
"Nocturne"
1994 ← Eurovision Song Contest → 1996

The Eurovision Song Contest 1995 was the 40th edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Dublin, Ireland, following Paul Harrington and Charlie McGettigan's win at the 1994 contest on homesoil with the song "Rock 'n' Roll Kids".

It was held on 13 May 1995 in the Point Theatre in Dublin, Ireland. The presenter was Mary Kennedy. This year's competition was the last with only one host until 18 years later in 2013 in Malmö, Sweden. This contest broke the chain of victories that Ireland enjoyed in 1992, 1993, and 1994. This was Ireland's 3rd year in succession to host the contest - and to mark the 40th show, it was opened with a 4-minute retrospective showing images from the contest's history. The Norwegian group Secret Garden was the winner of this contest with the mostly instrumental song, "Nocturne". Incidentally, Secret Garden's violinist was Fionnuala Sherry, who is Irish.

Location

The Point Theatre, Dublin – host venue of the 1995 contest.

After winning the 1994 contest, RTÉ was worried about whether they could afford to host a third consecutive contest in 1995. The BBC had offered to take on the responsibility of hosting the contest, and had even proposed that the contest be staged as a joint production in Belfast, capital of Northern Ireland. In the end, RTÉ decided to stage the contest on its own. However they did ask the EBU that, should Ireland win once more, that they would not be expected to host the event for the fourth year in a row, and eventually, it never happened.[1] Ireland hosted the contest for the sixth time after winning the contest for a 3rd consecutive year and is the only country to have hosted multiple contests in succession; three in a row between 1993 and 1995. Dublin was again chosen to be the host city, making it the fifth time that the Eurovision Song Contest was staged in the Irish capital. For the second consecutive year, the venue for the contest was the Point Theatre located on the North Wall Quay of the River Liffey, amongst the Dublin Docklands.

Contest overview

Two of Ireland's winners attended the contest; Dana, who was Ireland's first winner, winning the contest in 1970 with "All Kinds of Everything", and Mr Eurovision himself, Johnny Logan, winning the contest as a singer in 1980 and 1987 ("What's Another Year?" and "Hold Me Now" respectively), and also for writing Linda Martin's 1992 winning song "Why Me?". It was his birthday that night, but according to host Kennedy, "He wouldn't say which one!" Nonetheless, the audience sang "Happy Birthday" for him, assisted by the orchestra.

Heavy favourites to win the contest, according to bookmakers, were Sweden with the pop-ballad "Se på mig" and Slovenia, represented by Darja Švajger‘s entry “Prisluhni mi”. Other countries in contention for the win were Croatia, Denmark, Israel, Spain, and the eventual winner, Norway. The winning song was something new at Eurovision in that it contained only 24 words accompanied by long violin solos. The United Kingdom contributed a modern rap number, while the previous year's runner-up, Poland, went for something that completely contrasted with their début entry.

After the voting was completed, Norway was the winner with 148 points, followed by Spain's "Vuelve conmigo" with 119 points, and Sweden gaining 100 points.

The stage was designed by Alan Farquharson who also designed the set of the 1993 contest that took place in Millstreet, Ireland. Although it was quite dark and often gloomy in appearance, it did form the basis for a spectacular opening whereby a giant screen rotated to reveal the presenter who descended a stairway which ultimately disappeared to allow for the arrow-shaped stage to come together amid fireworks. The interval act consisted of several well known Irish performers including Clannad, Brian Kennedy (who would go on to actually represent Ireland 11 years later as well as collaborate with the winning group) and was composed by leading musician Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin.

The EBU decreased the number of participants to 23 to make sure the show would not last longer than three hours. Five of the six countries that were relegated in 1994 returned in 1995.

There was much speculation in Ireland as to whether RTÉ had deliberately chosen a song perceived as not having a good chance of winning in order to avoid hosting the contest for a fourth time in a row - although this was never verified. This rumour did, however, inspire a popular episode of Father Ted. In any event, RTÉ ended up hosting the contest once again in 1997.

Participating countries

Returning artists

Artist Country Previous years
Arzu Ece  Turkey 1989 (part of Pan)

Conductors

Each performance had a conductor who conducted the orchestra.

Results

Draw Country Artist Song Language[2][3] Place[4] Points
01  Poland Justyna "Sama" Polish 18 15
02  Ireland Eddie Friel "Dreamin'" English 14 44
03  Germany Stone & Stone "Verliebt in Dich" German 23 1
04  Bosnia and Herzegovina Davorin Popović "Dvadeset prvi vijek" Bosnian 19 14
05  Norway Secret Garden "Nocturne" Norwegian 1 148
06  Russia Philipp Kirkorov "Kolybelnaya dlya vulkana" (Колыбельная для вулкана) Russian 17 17
07  Iceland Bo Halldórsson "Núna" Icelandic 15 31
08  Austria Stella Jones "Die Welt dreht sich verkehrt" German 13 67
09  Spain Anabel Conde "Vuelve conmigo" Spanish 2 119
10  Turkey Arzu Ece "Sev" Turkish 16 21
11  Croatia Magazin & Lidija "Nostalgija" Croatian 6 91
12  France Nathalie Santamaria "Il me donne rendez-vous" French 4 94
13  Hungary Csaba Szigeti "Új név a régi ház falán" Hungarian 22 3
14  Belgium Frédéric Etherlinck "La voix est libre" French 20 8
15  United Kingdom Love City Groove "Love City Groove" English 10 76
16  Portugal Tó Cruz "Baunilha e chocolate" Portuguese 21 5
17  Cyprus Alexandros Panayi "Sti fotia" (Στη φωτιά) Greek 9 79
18  Sweden Jan Johansen "Se på mig" Swedish 3 100
19  Denmark Aud Wilken "Fra Mols til Skagen" Danish 5 92
20  Slovenia Darja Švajger "Prisluhni mi" Slovene 7 84
21  Israel Liora "Amen" (אמן) Hebrew 8 81
22  Malta Mike Spiteri "Keep Me In Mind" English 10 76
23  Greece Elina Konstantopoulou "Pia prosefhi" (Ποιά προσευχή) Greek[a] 12 68

Voting structure

Each country had a jury that awarded 12, 10, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 point(s) for their top ten songs.

Scoreboard

Voting results [5]
Total score
Poland
Ireland
Germany
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Norway
Russia
Iceland
Austria
Spain
Turkey
Croatia
France
Hungary
Belgium
United Kingdom
Portugal
Cyprus
Sweden
Denmark
Slovenia
Israel
Malta
Greece
Contestants
Poland 15 4 6 1 1 3
Ireland 44 1 5 1 5 3 3 5 1 10 1 5 4
Germany 1 1
Bosnia and Herzegovina 14 3 8 3
Norway 148 12 10 4 1 12 12 4 12 10 6 5 4 12 7 2 7 10 6 12
Russia 17 10 6 1
Iceland 31 6 2 3 4 2 6 8
Austria 67 2 3 6 4 8 4 10 5 2 4 10 2 7
Spain 119 8 2 6 8 5 8 10 7 2 12 8 7 10 12 8 6
Turkey 21 2 5 1 2 3 1 7
Croatia 91 3 10 7 10 12 7 4 5 12 4 12 5
France 94 7 5 8 6 8 10 2 3 10 6 1 2 3 6 8 7 2
Hungary 3 2 1
Belgium 8 1 7
United Kingdom 76 5 1 4 1 12 12 7 7 10 5 7 5
Portugal 5 4 1
Cyprus 79 1 3 5 4 2 5 1 12 8 3 8 5 4 6 4 8
Sweden 100 10 12 12 2 8 6 4 8 1 3 6 8 4 12 1 3
Denmark 92 3 7 7 3 12 10 7 7 6 3 3 6 12 6
Slovenia 84 4 8 5 6 7 1 3 2 8 10 5 3 7 3 2 10
Israel 81 10 7 8 6 4 5 4 12 8 2 10 5
Malta 76 4 2 12 2 10 10 12 6 7 6 1 4
Greece 68 6 5 8 7 5 2 3 12 2 8 10

12 points

Below is a summary of all 12 points in the final:

N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
6  Norway  Greece,  Iceland,  Poland,  Portugal,  Russia,  Turkey
3  Croatia  Malta,  Slovenia,  Spain
 Sweden  Denmark,  Germany,  Ireland
2  Denmark  Norway,  Sweden
 Malta  Bosnia and Herzegovina,  Croatia
 Spain  Belgium,  Israel
 United Kingdom  Austria,  France
1  Cyprus  Hungary
 Greece  Cyprus
 Israel  United Kingdom

International broadcasts and voting

Voting and spokespersons

The spokespersons announced the score from their respective country's national jury in running order.

  1.  Poland - Jan Chojnacki
  2.  Ireland - Eileen Dunne
  3.  Germany - Carmen Nebel
  4.  Bosnia and Herzegovina - Diana Grković-Foretić
  5.  Norway - Sverre Christophersen
  6.  Russia - Marina Danielian
  7.  Iceland - Áslaug Dóra Eyjólfsdóttir
  8.  Austria - Tilia Herold
  9.  Spain - Belén Fernández de Henestrosa
  10.  Turkey - Ömer Önder
  11.  Croatia - Daniela Trbović[6]
  12.  France - Thierry Beccaro[7]
  13.  Hungary - Katalin Bogyay
  14.  Belgium - Marie-Françoise Renson "Soda"[7]
  15.  United Kingdom - Colin Berry
  16.  Portugal - Serenella Andrade[8]
  17.  Cyprus - Andreas Iakovidis[9]
  18.  Sweden - Björn Hedman[10]
  19.  Denmark - Bent Henius [dk]
  20.  Slovenia - Miša Molk
  21.  Israel - Daniel Pe'er (co-presenter of the 1979 contest)[11]
  22.  Malta - Stephanie Farrugia
  23.  Greece - Fotini Giannoulatou[12]

Commentators

Most countries sent commentators to Dublin or commented from their own country, in order to provide coverage of the contest, such as adding insight to the participants.

Radio

The participating countries that provided radio broadcasts for the event are listed below.

National jury members

  •  Poland - Andrzej Marzec (music producer), Małgorzata Gelo, Marek Bieliński (composer), Ewa Zychowicz, Irena Santor (singer), Marek Łańcucki, Edyta Górniak (singer, Polish entrant and runner-up of Eurovision Song Contest 1994), Mariusz Jagoda, Janusz Rzeszewski, Justyna Kucharska, Czesław Niemen (singer and composer), Mirosława Zamojska, Janusz Stokłosa (composer, pianist, co-author of Metro (musical) and Tony Award nominee), Agnieszka Jakołcewicz, Robert Janson (composer, leader of Varius Manx), Wiesława Siudara[32]
  •  Ireland – Joe Delaney, Stuart Lawler
  •  SpainÁngel Lacalle (journalist), María Kosty (actress), Roberto Antolín (bullfighter), Sara Salazar (singer), Valentín Paredes (actor), Pilar Socorro (journalist at RNE), Lucio Blázquez (restaurant manager), Cuca García de Vinuesa (communication expert), Alejandro Abad (singer and composer, Spanish entrant at Eurovision Song Contest 1994), Marily Coll (fashion designer), Arturo Beltrán (businessman), Silvia Abascal (actress), Enrique Cosano (Eurovision fan), Agustina López de los Mozos (businesswoman), Justo Molinero (journalist and music critic), Verónica Magaz (student)[33]
  •  TurkeyVedat Sakman
  •  United KingdomYvonne Littlewood, Gilly Archer, Colin Fay, Susan King, Gib Grace, Charlie Cole, Emily Collins, Dominic Hall, Daniel Beach, Deni Lew, Richard Fox, Philip Stredwick, Tamzyn Williams, Idris Baker, Cara McMahon, Katrina O'Connor
  •  PortugalAnabela, Luís Filipe, Vasco da Camara Pereira
  •  SwedenChrister Borg
  •  DenmarkViggo Steincke Bertelsen
  •  GreeceGrigoris Lambrianidis, Stamatis Mazaris, Lida Halkiadaki, Takis Antoniadis, Agni Hatzikotaki, Antonis Papaioannou, Andreas Hatziapostolou, Angeliki Segditsa, Filia Anastasiadou, Evangelia Vagopoulou, Filippos Varanakis, Anastasia Doulfi, Fotini Theologou, Kostas Kapiris, Panos Kourmouzis, Stavros Moles

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