Frank J. Donahue

Frank J. Donahue
Frank J. Donahue.png
18th Massachusetts Secretary of the Commonwealth[2]
In office
January 15, 1913[1] – 1915
Preceded by Albert P. Langtry
Succeeded by Albert P. Langtry
Majority 4,576 (1912);[3]
42,642 (1913)[4]
Associate Justice of the
Massachusetts Superior Court
In office
1932–1974
Nominated by Joseph B. Ely[5]
Preceded by Charles H. Donahue[5]
Succeeded by Roger J. Donahue[6]
Chairperson of the Massachusetts Democratic Party
In office
1928–1932
Preceded by Charles H. McGlue
Succeeded by Joseph A. Maynard
Personal details
Political party Democratic[2]
Children Roger J. Donahue[6]
Frank Donahue;
Malcolm Donahue.[7]
Alma mater Suffolk University Law School, 1921.
Profession Pharmacist[2]

Frank J. Donahue (1881–1979) was an American politician who served as the Massachusetts Secretary of the Commonwealth, Chairman of the Massachusetts Democratic State Committee,[8] and as an Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Superior Court.[9]

1912 Election

Before the 1912 election the Progressive Bull Moose party split from Republican party. The Republican vote was split between the Republicans and Progressives. Donahue defeated Republican Albert P. Langtry by a plurality of 4,576 votes.[3]

Reelection in 1913

In the 1913 election Progressives and Republicans again candidates for Secretary of the Commonwealth. The Republican vote was again split. Donahue was reelected by a 42,642 plurality.[4]

Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Superior Court

Donahue was appointed as an Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Superior Court, he served as an Associate Justice of the Court for forty-two years [1] Frank J. Donahue was succeeded as a Superior Court Justice by his son Roger J. Donahue.[6]

References

  1. ^ Hennessy, Michael Edmund (1917), Twenty-five Years of Massachusetts Politics: from Russell to McCall, 1890-1915, Boston, Massachusetts: Practical Politics, pp. 325–326.
  2. ^ a b c The Boston Daily Globe (November 9, 1913), SEC OF STATE FRANK J. DONAHUE LED THE DEMOCRATIC TICKET. Had 654 Votes More Than the Governor-Elect--Like the Secretary, the New Treasurer Studied Pharmacy--Frank Pope, Leominster's Best Known Citizen--New Attorney General's First Victory Was Over An Unruly Country School., Boston, Massachusetts: The Boston Globe, p. 52 Check date values in: |year= / |date= mismatch (help)
  3. ^ a b Hennessy, Michael Edmund (1917), Twenty-five Years of Massachusetts Politics: from Russell to McCall, 1890-1915, Boston, Ma: Practical Politics, p. 311.
  4. ^ a b Hennessy, Michael Edmund (1917), Twenty-five Years of Massachusetts Politics: from Russell to McCall, 1890-1915, Boston, Ma: Practical Politics, p. 349.
  5. ^ a b The Christian Science Monitor (May 5, 1932), FRANK J. DONOHUE NAMED JUSTICE, Boston, Massachusetts: The Christian Science Monitor
  6. ^ a b c Marquard, Bryan (November 20, 2009), Roger J. Donahue, at 86; was Superior Court judge, Boston, Massachusetts: The Boston Globe
  7. ^ The Cape Cod Times (October 30, 2009), The Honorable Roger J. Donahue, 86 - WWII vet; retired Mass. Superior Court Judge, Barnstable, Massachusetts: The Cape Cod Times
  8. ^ Hennessey, Michael E. (1971) [1935]. Four Decades of Massachusetts Politics, 1890-1935. Massachusetts: Ayer Publishing. p. 544. ISBN 0-8369-5700-8.
  9. ^ Hennessey, Michael E. (1971) [1935]. Four Decades of Massachusetts Politics, 1890-1935. Massachusetts: Ayer Publishing. p. 153. ISBN 0-8369-5700-8.

External links

Political offices
Preceded by
Albert P. Langtry
18th Massachusetts Secretary of the Commonwealth
1913–1915
Succeeded by
Albert P. Langtry
Party political offices
Preceded by
Charles H. McGlue
Chairman of the Massachusetts Democratic State Committee
1928–1932
Succeeded by
Joseph A. Maynard
Legal offices
Preceded by
Charles H. Donahue
Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Superior Court
1932–1974
Succeeded by
Roger J. Donahue


Other Languages