Hidenoumi Takuya

Hidenoumi Takuya
英乃海
Hidenoumi 2015 May.JPG
Hidenoumi in 2015
Personal information
Born Takuya Iwasaki
(1989-06-11) 11 June 1989 (age 31)
Edogawa, Tokyo
Height 1.86 m (6 ft 1 in)
Weight 159 kg (351 lb)
Career
Stable Kise
University Nihon University
Current rank see below
Debut May, 2012
Highest rank Maegashira 6 (May, 2021)
Championships 1 Jūryō
1 Jonidan
1 Jonokuchi
* Up to date as of 26 May 2021.

Hidenoumi Takuya (Japanese: 英乃海 拓也, born 11 June 1989 as Iwasaki Takuya (岩崎 拓也)) is a Japanese professional sumo wrestler. A former amateur sumo competitor at Nihon University, he made his professional debut in 2012 and was promoted to the top makuuchi division in July 2015. His highest rank to date is maegashira 6. He has one jūryō division yūshō or championship. He is a member of Kise stable.

Early life and sumo background

Takuya Iwasaki was born on 11 June 1989 in Edogawa, Tokyo, the older of two brothers. He first started sumo in primary school from the age of 10 and was soon a regular on the team. He went on to join his junior high school's sumo team, also as a regular. The dojo where he practiced was also used by Chiyotairyū, one year his senior, and had also been used by Daidō, seven years his senior. In high school, his interest and success in sumo continued. He transferred to Saitama Sakae high school, which was known for its strong sumo program. As a member of the sumo club there, he had a string of victories as an anchor member of his sumo team in a number of high school tournaments. In his second year he took the championship at a high school tournament in Kanazawa. Upon graduation, he was scouted by stables, but chose to enter Nihon University, where he joined its well-known sumo program. He was in the same year as the future Daikihō and one year behind the later Jōkōryū. He was not as successful or motivated in university and was not able to take a championship in his four years there. Upon graduation, he was scouted by the head of Kise stable, the former Higonoumi, who was also from his alma mater, Nihon University. Not having achieved the requisite two championships in university, he was obligated to start pro sumo from the bottom of the ranks.[1]

Career

He began his career under his surname Iwasaki. He made his debut in the jonokuchi division at Nagoya in July 2012 and won all seven of his contests to win the division and ensure immediate promotion to jonidan. He faced fellow 7–0 stablemate Hamaguchi in a playoff for the championship; the only situation in which stablemates are allowed to face one another. In September he recorded another perfect record in the jonidan division. Notably, he again faced stablemate Hamaguchi in a playoff, which he again won. This was the first time in sumo history that two stablemates had faced each other in a championship playoff in two consecutive tournaments. In November at Fukuoka he secured a third consecutive promotion when he recorded a 6–1 record in the sandanme division. For the next eleven tournaments, Iwasaki competed in the makushita recording more wins than losses (kachi-koshi) on all but two occasions.[1]

For the Fukuoka tournament in November 2014 he was promoted to the jūryō division[2] and adopted the ring name (shikona) Hidenoumi. In his first appearance in the division he recorded seven wins and five losses, but missed three bouts through injury. After recording winning records in the next three tournaments he was promoted to the top makuuchi division for the Nagoya tournament in July 2015.[1] On his debut in the top division Hidenoumi won only three of his first ten bouts but won three of his last five matches to end with a record of 6–9. An identical record in September saw him return to the jūryō ranks for the November tournament where he posted an 8–7 record. In January 2016 he recorded 11 wins to take the second-division championship and returned to the top division. In March, at a career high ranking of maegashira 12, he reached a score of 6–6 after 12 days, but defeats to Ichinojō and Shōdai saw him end the tournament with a losing record despite victory over Takayasu on the final day. In May he struggled for form, recorded only five wins and was relegated to the second division where he recorded seven wins in July. Wrestling at jūryō 4 in September he recorded nine wins and secured his third promotion to the top division. He was able to win only four bouts in the November 2016 tournament and was knocked unconscious by a blow to the head at the tachi-ai from Kotoyuki on Day 14, causing him to pull out on the final day. He spent all of 2017 in the jūryō division. He took part in a playoff for the jūryō division championship in January 2018 but was defeated by Myōgiryū. However, his 10–5 record was enough to earn him promotion back to makuuchi for the March 2018 tournament. His return was short-lived as a 3–12 record sent him immediately back to jūryō.

In March 2021 Hidenoumi won promotion back to makuuchi after 17 tournaments and joined his brother Tobizaru there. This marked the ninth time there were brothers ranked in the top division simultaneously,[3] and the first since Chiyomaru and Chiyoōtori in March 2014. He produced his first winning record in the top division at the seventh attempt, a 10–5, which saw him promoted to his highest rank to date of maegashira 6 for the May 2021 tournament.

Family

Hidenoumi's younger brother Masaya is also a sumo wrestler who wrestles for Oitekaze stable under the shikona of Tobizaru. Tobizaru was promoted to jūryō in July 2017 and makuuchi in September 2020; they became the 18th pair of sekitori brothers in sumo history.[4] Despite the fact that they are in different stables, Hidenoumi will not face him in competition as Japan Sumo Association rules prevent close relatives from being matched against each other outside of playoff bouts.

Fighting style

Hidenoumi's most common winning techniques (kimarite) are oshidashi or push-out which accounts for 40% of his wins and yorikiri or force-out (30%).[5] He favours a migi-yotsu (left hand outside, right hand inside) position when gripping his opponent's mawashi (belt).

Career record

Hidenoumi Takuya [1]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
2012 x x (Maezumo) East Jonokuchi #17
7–0–P
Champion

 
East Jonidan #11
7–0–P
Champion

 
West Sandanme #18
6–1
 
2013 East Makushita #36
4–3
 
West Makushita #28
3–4
 
West Makushita #39
5–2
 
East Makushita #26
4–3
 
West Makushita #20
4–3
 
West Makushita #15
4–3
 
2014 West Makushita #12
4–3
 
West Makushita #8
4–3
 
East Makushita #5
3–4
 
East Makushita #9
6–1
 
West Makushita #2
6–1
 
East Jūryō #11
7–5–3
 
2015 West Jūryō #11
9–6
 
East Jūryō #7
8–7
 
East Jūryō #5
11–4
 
East Maegashira #13
6–9
 
West Maegashira #15
6–9
 
East Jūryō #3
8–7
 
2016 West Jūryō #2
11–4
Champion

 
West Maegashira #12
7–8
 
West Maegashira #13
5–10
 
East Jūryō #2
7–8
 
East Jūryō #4
9–6
 
East Maegashira #13
4–11
 
2017 West Jūryō #1
7–8
 
East Jūryō #3
6–9
 
East Jūryō #5
8–7
 
West Jūryō #2
5–10
 
East Jūryō #7
6–9
 
East Jūryō #10
10–5
 
2018 West Jūryō #3
10–5–P
 
West Maegashira #16
3–12
 
West Jūryō #4
7–8
 
West Jūryō #5
7–8
 
East Jūryō #6
8–7
 
West Jūryō #4
6–9
 
2019 West Jūryō #8
6–9
 
East Jūryō #10
9–6
 
West Jūryō #6
7–8
 
East Jūryō #7
8–7
 
West Jūryō #6
9–6
 
East Jūryō #4
8–7
 
2020 West Jūryō #2
8–7
 
West Jūryō #1
6–9
 
West Jūryō #4
Tournament Cancelled
0–0–0
West Jūryō #4
5–10
 
East Jūryō #9
9–6
 
West Jūryō #5
7–8
 
2021 West Jūryō #6
11–4
 
West Maegashira #15
10–5
 
East Maegashira #6

 
x x x
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Hidenoumi Takuya Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 31 May 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ "岩崎、新十両昇進濃厚で親方に「恩返し」". nikkansports.com.
  3. ^ "Sumo: Daieisho back among elite as Hakuho set for century milestone". The Mainichi. 1 March 2021. Retrieved 2 March 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ "岩崎改め翔猿が新十両 18組目の兄弟関取に" (in Japanese). Sponichi. 31 May 2017. Retrieved 22 August 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 22 January 2016. Retrieved 7 February 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)

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