Hobart College, Tasmania

Hobart College
Hobart College, Tasmania logo.jpg
Hobart College logo
Address
Olinda Grove


, ,
7007

Information
School type Public, post year 10 educational institution
Motto Motto: Tradition Diversity Excellence
Established 1 January 1913 (1913-01-01)
Status Open
Sister school Fuzhou Number 8 Middle School, China
Authority Department of Education (Tasmania)
Principal Tracy Siedler
Assistant Principals Wendy Irvine, Dawn Cripps, Vanessa Warren and Felix Goward
Grades 11–12
Gender Co-ed
Enrolment ~1,000
Color(s) Blue and yellow          
Website

Hobart College is a senior secondary college located at Mount Nelson, in Hobart, Tasmania. There was a private Hobart High in the 19th century.[1] The current Government school was founded in 1913 as Hobart High School, renamed Hobart High Matriculation College in 1966, Hobart Matriculation College in 1965 and subsequently Hobart College. It is a post year 10 institute, offering the final two years of the Tasmanian curriculum, awarding the Tasmanian Certificate of Education (TCE) and VET certificates.

The college was the first in Tasmania to be developed solely for years 11 and 12, the students in years 7–10 being re-directed to other high schools such as Taroona High School.[2] The college further has one of the largest International Student Programs in Tasmania.

The current Hobart College campus was originally part of the former Tasmanian College of Advanced Education, established in 1972, a large part of which was eventually absorbed into the University of Tasmania. Buildings on the campus reflect the architectural style of inner city American college designers of the late 1960s, with massive concrete facades and few windows in the earliest buildings. Hobart Matriculation College relocated to the Mount Nelson campus from its previous 71 Letitia St North Hobart location in 1984.[3] Prior to this, between 1913 and 1917 the Hobart High School was located at Trinity Hill, also in North Hobart.[4]

Mount Nelson campus facilities

Front of Hobart College campus, A & B block buildings

College facilities include a drama auditorium, sport and recreation centre, library, various computer laboratories, canteen, and many sporting fields.

  • A Block is the largest of the college's buildings. It houses the school's main entry and admin offices along with library, the music, digital visual arts, SOSE, legal studies, behavioural studies and business.
  • B Block houses administrative offices for the Department of Education and underground car parking for staff.
  • C Block contains Visual Arts, MDT, Food & Textiles teaching areas.
  • D Block contains performing arts, foreign languages, health, English, main auditorium and the Salamanca Performing Arts Course in Entertainment.
  • E Block houses Science and Mathematics.
  • F Block houses Physical and Outdoor Studies and the gym.

Trinity Hill

The commencement of the Hobart State High School was an important step for education in Tasmania, as it was the first state high school set up in Tasmania. A high school was also established in Launceston sharing two class rooms of the Charles Street Primary School.

In order to gain entrance to the new state high schools in Tasmania students had to have a qualifying certificate from class teacher and pass their grade 6 exam. Attendance at high school was optional. On 26 November 1912, 885 students sat for the exams, and 513 qualified to enter high school either in Hobart or Launceston. However only about half actually enrolled.[5] Some of the students were permitted to start the second year when the school started.[6]

The old Trinity Hill state school was remodelled. There were five class rooms, a teacher's room, a science room, two cloak rooms, and a woodwork workshop.[7] Classes started on Tuesday 28 January 1913 at 9 AM. The new high school was officially opened by the premier Albert Solomon on 29 January 1813. The school started with 137 scholars, 69 girls and 86 boys.[8] The original courses included teaching, university preparation, industrial, commercial, and home making. Common subjects for each course were English, geography, history, mathematics, music and physical culture. Students in the teaching course also had to learn a foreign language, science, and woodwork or cookery. Students desiring to enter university had to study two foreign languages, and two science subjects. Commercial school students had to study business principles and practice, shorthand and bookkeeping. The industrial course was for those that wanted to be mechanics. It included drawing, benchwork and science. The domestic course included needlework, cooking and domestic hygiene.[9] The foreign language courses included Latin for university entrance, and French and German were considered more useful for occupational benefit. History covered Australian history and English history.[10] Science subjects included Chemistry and Physics. Mathematics included Geometry and Algebra.[8]

An intermediate certificate would be issued after two years of education on passing the exams. A leaving certificate was issued to those that completed the two year upper school courses.[9]

The purpose of the high school was to provide for education of students that would otherwise drop out after primary school. The aim was not to satisfy examiners, but to "broaden and deepen the educational outlook and cultivating right thoughts and actions".[9]

The first principal was Mr P. H. Mitchell B.A. who was previously working as principal at the Beaconsfield Primary school. The other original teachers that started at the school were Mr. G. L. Wood, Mr C. L. Sharp, Miss Law, Mr. R. C. Stephens, BA.,[11] and Miss M. W. Weaver, B.A.[12] In 1914 the Hobart State High School in its second year had 113 first year students, 74 second year, and 35 in third year. Fourth year class had not yet started.[13] Enrollments for each course were secondary course: 49; teachers: 28; industrial: 33; commercial: 97. Space for the school was insufficient, and with overcrowding even the cloakrooms were used as classrooms.[7] The teacher's residence at Ivy Lodge was then planned to convert to woodwork workshops for students.[14] Later space was rented in the Hobart Baptist Tabernacle.[7]

Graduates from the Hobart State High School are called "Old Hobartians". This term was suggested by the teacher R. C. Stephens. The Old Hobartians Association was formed on 19 June 1915.[15]

The school moved to the Letitia Street building, and its accommodation was immediately taken over by the infant department of the nearby Elizabeth Street Practising School.[16]

Eventually the building was sold off by the Tasmanian government in 2013 for $2.8 million.[17]

Letitia Street campus

From 1918 to 1984 the school was located at 71 Letitia Street, North Hobart.

A new site for the Hobart State High School was selected in North Hobart on a 2-acre (0.81-hectare) block between Park Street (now the Brooker Highway), Federal Street and Letitia Street, on which a tramway ran. It was adjacent to the Queens Domain and close to the North Hobart recreation ground. One building was designed with space, ventilation, lighting and heating.[18] The building cost Β£15,000.[19]

The new site was officially opened by the premier G. H Lee on 18 December 1917.[20] The Hobart State High School started at the new location on Michaelmas (29 September) 1918.[21] By 1919 in addition to the main building there was a separate block containing science laboratories and wordworking and fitting shops.[21] A new building for science and music opened on 7 June 1958.[22]

Students were organised into three colour groups for sporting competition purposes, red green and blue.[21] Later on gold was added.[23]

A Student's Christian Union formed in 1920, let by YMCA staff, it met once a week.[23]

By 1922 high school study had been extended to five years, with an additional year required to achieve the Intermediate Certificate.[23]

In 1922 inter-school sports included hockey, football, cross-country running, tennis, cricket and swimming.[23]

In 1928 four extra classrooms were added to the main building at a cost of Β£2162 by H. W. Pease.[24]

The 21st celebration of the Hobart High School was celebrated with a speech night at the Hobart City Hall attended by the governor of Tasmania, Sir Ernest Clark on Monday 6 March 1934. Later in the week there was a swimming carnival and sports competition. A special church service at the Wesley Church completed the week of celebration on Sunday.[25]

In 1935 two blind pupils enrolled from the nearby Institution of the Blind, Deaf and Dumb and were provided Braille textbooks.[26] (One of these successfully completed 5 years).[27] The school was again excessively crowded, with the locker room in the basement being used as a classroom.[28] In this year wireless was installed throughout the school.[29]

In 1936 the government considered building a new high school at nearby New Town.[30]

The Governor-General of Australia, Lord Gowrie visited the school in February 1937.[31] Film projectors were ordered in 1938.[32] Also in 1938 intermediate exams were abolished,[33] which meant that the intermediate certificate was based on schoolwork from 1939 onwards. A basketball court and two new tennis courts were made available in 1939.[34]

In 1940 extra building work included a library, dining room, gymnasium, domestic science block and fences.[27]

During World War II, the Hobart State High School contained the first aid post for sector 7, North-East Hobart.[35]

A new canteen opened at the site on 12 March 1953.[36]

Notable alumni

Former Hobart College student, Princess Mary of Denmark

Publications

Over the years the school has produced several publications.[41]

  • Magazine 1914-1918
  • The Centurion : a monthly magazine of pleasant and varied reading 1918
  • The Log[42]
  • The Compass : Hobart High School science journal 1955-1967
  • Knots -1959
  • Probe 1964-1968
  • Handbook 1960s-2007

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Obituary". Auckland Star. LI (309). 28 December 1920. p. 5. Retrieved 3 May 2013.
  2. ^ "Archive Office of Tasmania". Retrieved 13 September 2009.
  3. ^ Brewer, Warren B. (1985). Last assembly : a celebration of education at 71 Letitia Street, Sunday December 10th, 1995. Hobart: Department of Education and the Arts. Education Services.
  4. ^ "Hobart High School records". Libraries Tasmania.
  5. ^ "STATE HIGH SCHOOLS". The Mercury. XCVIII (13, 344). Tasmania, Australia. 4 January 1913. p. 7. Retrieved 10 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  6. ^ "EDUCATION DEPARTMENT". The Mercury. C (13, 794). Tasmania, Australia. 14 May 1914. p. 8. Retrieved 10 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  7. ^ a b c "Public Works Committee. Proposed New High School In Hobart. Director Emphasises The Need". The Mercury. CIII (14, 263). Tasmania, Australia. 27 November 1915. p. 4. Retrieved 10 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  8. ^ a b "Hobart State High School. First Annual Speech Day. A Successful Gathering". The Mercury. CII (14, 019). Tasmania, Australia. 6 February 1915. p. 6. Retrieved 11 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  9. ^ a b c "THE STATE HIGH SCHOOLS". The Mercury. XCVIII (13, 366). Tasmania, Australia. 30 January 1913. p. 8. Retrieved 10 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  10. ^ "EDUCATION DEPARTMENT The Report for 1912". The Examiner (Tasmania). LXXII (144). Tasmania, Australia. 18 June 1913. p. 7 (DAILY). Retrieved 10 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  11. ^ "LATE MR. R. STEPHENS". World. VII (633). Tasmania, Australia. 16 November 1922. p. 2. Retrieved 11 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  12. ^ "STATE HIGH SCHOOLS". The Examiner (Tasmania). LXXI (293). Tasmania, Australia. 7 December 1912. p. 5 (DAILY). Retrieved 10 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  13. ^ "Education Department. Annual Report. An All-round Advance". The Examiner (Tasmania). LXXIV (130). Tasmania, Australia. 2 June 1915. p. 7 (DAILY). Retrieved 10 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  14. ^ "STATE HIGH SCHOOLS". The Mercury. XCX (13, 711). Tasmania, Australia. 4 February 1914. p. 5. Retrieved 10 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  15. ^ "CIVIC SERVICE - Old Hobartians Praised - "Coming of Age" Dinner". The Mercury. CXLIV (20, 477). Tasmania, Australia. 15 June 1936. p. 5. Retrieved 10 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  16. ^ "STATE HIGH SCHOOL". The Mercury. CVII (14, 969). Tasmania, Australia. 11 October 1917. p. 4. Retrieved 10 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  17. ^ Hodgman, Will (4 April 2017). "Greens hypocrisy exposed". www.premier.tas.gov.au.
  18. ^ "Proposed State High School - Recommended By Public Works Committee - Electrical Heating Recommended". The Mercury. CIII (14, 268). Tasmania, Australia. 3 December 1915. p. 4. Retrieved 10 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  19. ^ "TASMANIA". Zeehan And Dundas Herald. XXIX (57). Tasmania, Australia. 19 December 1917. p. 2. Retrieved 10 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  20. ^ "HOBART STATE HIGH SCHOOL". Daily Telegraph. XXXVII (303). Tasmania, Australia. 20 December 1917. p. 4. Retrieved 10 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  21. ^ a b c "A Flourishing Institution - State High School's Progress - Its Place in Community". World. II (61). Tasmania, Australia. 12 March 1919. p. 2. Retrieved 10 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  22. ^ Official opening of the new building for science and music, 7th June 1958 : programme. Hobart: Mercury. 1958. pp. 1–4.
  23. ^ a b c d "HOBART-STATE HIGH SCHOOL. Annual Speech Night". The Mercury. CXVI (16, 991). Tasmania, Australia. 17 March 1922. p. 6. Retrieved 10 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  24. ^ "HOBART STATE HIGH SCHOOL". The Mercury. CXXIX (18, 986). Tasmania, Australia. 12 September 1928. p. 5. Retrieved 10 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  25. ^ "Justified The High School System Coming of Age". The Examiner (Tasmania). XCII (304). Tasmania, Australia. 6 March 1934. p. 7 (DAILY). Retrieved 10 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  26. ^ "No title". Dungog Chronicle : Durham and Gloucester Advertiser. New South Wales, Australia. 1 March 1935. p. 3. Retrieved 11 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  27. ^ a b "HIGH SCHOOL PARENTS". The Mercury. CLII (21, 603). Tasmania, Australia. 22 February 1940. p. 6. Retrieved 11 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  28. ^ "A ROYAL WELCOME". The Mercury. CXLII (20, 070). Tasmania, Australia. 20 February 1935. p. 7. Retrieved 11 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  29. ^ "HIGH SCHOOL PARENTS". The Mercury. CXLI (20, 064). Tasmania, Australia. 13 February 1935. p. 5. Retrieved 11 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  30. ^ "General News Items Tasmania New High School". The Mercury. CXLIV (20, 463). Tasmania, Australia. 29 May 1936. p. 7. Retrieved 11 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  31. ^ "High School Girls Provide Guard Of Honour". The Mercury. CXLVI (20, 695). Tasmania, Australia. 26 February 1937. p. 12. Retrieved 12 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  32. ^ "VISUAL EDUCATION". The Mercury. CXLVIII (21, 018). Tasmania, Australia. 6 April 1938. p. 10. Retrieved 12 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  33. ^ "EXAMINATION SYSTEM". The Mercury. CXLVIII (21, 019). Tasmania, Australia. 7 April 1938. p. 10. Retrieved 12 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  34. ^ "HIGH SCHOOL PROGRESS". The Mercury. CL (21, 328). Tasmania, Australia. 5 April 1939. p. 11. Retrieved 14 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  35. ^ "WHAT TO KNOW ABOUT A.R.P." The Mercury. CLV (22, 181). Tasmania, Australia. 1 January 1942. p. 4. Retrieved 15 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  36. ^ "High School Canteen Opened". The Mercury. CLXXIII (25, 656). Tasmania, Australia. 13 March 1953. p. 6. Retrieved 15 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  37. ^ "Eric Abetz – Liberal Party of Australia". Liberal Party of Australia. Retrieved 23 November 2011.
  38. ^ "HRH The Crown Princess". The Danish Monarchy (Official Website). Archived from the original on 28 December 2008. Retrieved 23 November 2011.
  39. ^ "Rodney Eade Collingwood Football Club Profile". The Collingwood Football Club (Official Website). Archived from the original on 24 August 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2012.
  40. ^ "His Excellency Malcolm McCusker AC CVO QC, Governor of Western Australia". Government House Western Australia. Archived from the original on 1 July 2017. Retrieved 9 February 2014.
  41. ^ "Authors: "Hobart High School (Tas.)"". Libraries Tasmania.
  42. ^ "OBITUARY MR. C. J. MULLIGAN". The Mercury. CLI (21, 686). Tasmania, Australia. 30 May 1940. p. 6. Retrieved 11 September 2019 – via National Library of Australia.

External links

Additional reading

  • Batt, Neil, ed. (1963). Fifty years, 1913-1963 : the history of the Hobart High School. Hobart: Hobart High School. pp. 1–96.

Coordinates: 42Β°55β€²10β€³S 147Β°18β€²57β€³Eο»Ώ / ο»Ώ42.91933Β°S 147.31591Β°Eο»Ώ / -42.91933; 147.31591

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