Huntsville Stars

Huntsville Stars
1985–2014
Huntsville, Alabama
HuntsvilleStarsLogo2008.PNG HuntsvilleStarsCapLogo2008.PNG
Team logo Cap insignia
Minor league affiliations
Class Double-A
League Southern League
Major league affiliations
Team Milwaukee Brewers (1999–2014)
Oakland Athletics (1985–1998)
Minor league titles
League titles (3)
  • 1985
  • 1994
  • 2001
Division titles (8)
  • 1985
  • 1986
  • 1994
  • 1997
  • 2001
  • 2003
  • 2006
  • 2007
First half titles (8)
  • 1985
  • 1986
  • 1994
  • 2001
  • 2003
  • 2007
  • 2009
  • 2014
Second half titles (5)
  • 1987
  • 1989
  • 1997
  • 2006
  • 2007
Team data
Nickname Huntsville Stars
Colors Blue, red, gray, white
       
Mascot Homer the Polecat (1995–2014)
Ballpark Joe W. Davis Stadium

The Huntsville Stars were a Minor League Baseball team that played in Huntsville, Alabama, from 1985 to 2014. They competed in the Southern League as the Double-A affiliate of Major League Baseball's Oakland Athletics from 1985 to 1998 and Milwaukee Brewers from 1999 to 2014. The Stars played their home games at Joe W. Davis Stadium and were named for the space industry with which Huntsville is economically tied (NASA conducts operations at the nearby Marshall Space Flight Center).[1]

The team began play in 1985 after a Southern League franchise operating in Nashville, Tennessee, as the Nashville Sounds, was transferred to Huntsville. They remained in the city for 30 years before being relocated to Biloxi, Mississippi, where they became known as the Biloxi Shuckers, after the 2014 season.

Over the course of playing in 4,211 regular season games and compiling a win–loss record of 2,112–2,099, Huntsville reached the postseason on 14 occasions, winning 13 half-season titles, 10 division titles, and 3 Southern League championships. They won their first league championship in their inaugural 1985 season as an affiliate of the Oakland Athletics. They won a second with Oakland in 1994 and a third in 2001 with the Milwaukee Brewers.

History

Coming to Huntsville

A black and white portrait of a smiling man
Larry Schmittou moved his Southern League franchise from Nashville to Huntsville, becoming the Stars in 1985.

In July 1984, Larry Schmittou, president of the Nashville Sounds of the Double-A Southern League, and other members of the team's ownership group purchased the Evansville Triplets of the Triple-A American Association with plans to move the franchise from Evansville, Indiana, to Nashville for the 1985 season.[2] The Southern League wanted Schmittou to surrender his franchise to the league, but he had plans to relocate the team instead.[3] He wanted to send Nashville's existing Southern League franchise to Evansville to continue as the Triplets at Double-A. However, a combination of the league's disapproval of the move and the City of Evansville being unwilling to upgrade Bosse Field resulted in a move to Huntsville, Alabama.[3] The city, led by Mayor Joe W. Davis, agreed to build a brand new 10,000-seat multipurpose stadium which lured the franchise to town where it began play in 1985 as the Huntsville Stars.[3] The Triple-A Sounds carried on the history of the Double-A team that preceded it, while the Stars were established as an entirely new franchise.[3] Schmittou and several other Sounds shareholders owned the Stars, while Don Mincher, a Huntsville native and 12-year veteran of the major leagues, operated the team as its General Manager.[3]

Oakland Athletics (1985–1998)

The Huntsville Stars became the Double-A affiliate of the Oakland Athletics. Manager Brad Fischer guided the franchise to win the First Half Western Division title in their inaugural season. They then defeated the Knoxville Blue Jays, 3–1, in the Western Division finals on the way to winning their first Southern League championship in their first season by defeating the Charlotte O's, 3–2.[4] Outfielder Jose Canseco was selected as the Southern League Most Valuable Player (MVP).[5]

In 1986, the Stars hosted the Southern League All-Star Game at Joe W. Davis Stadium on July 23. A team of Southern League All-Stars was defeated by the Nashville Sounds, 4–2. Huntsville catcher Terry Steinbach won the game's MVP Award.[6] The 1986 Stars repeated with another first half title and won the Western Division against the Knoxville Blue Jays, 3–1. They were defeated in the finals, however, by the Columbus Astros, 3–2.[4] Steinbach won the league's MVP Award.[5] In 1987, they reached the postseason for the third consecutive season by winning the second half of the season, but fell to the Birmingham Barons, 3–0, in the Western Division finals. The 1988 club finished with a 59–85 (.410) record, the lowest in franchise history.

The 1989 Stars returned to the playoffs having won the second half, but were again defeated by Birmingham in the division finals, 3–1. Manager Jeff Newman was selected for the Southern League Manager of the Year Award.[5] The team missed the postseason in both 1990 and 1991. In 1991, Huntsville hosted the first Double-A All-Star Game on July 10. A team of American League-affiliated All-Stars defeated a team of National League-affiliated All-Stars, 8–2.[7] On August 3, 1992, pitchers Dana Allison, Roger Smithberg, and Todd Revering combined to pitch a 10-inning, 1–0 no-hitter against Birmingham.[8] The Chattanooga Lookouts won both halves of the 1992 season, but Huntsville qualified for the postseason with the second-best overall record in the Western Division. They were defeated by the Lookouts, 3–1, in the division series. First baseman Marcos Armas was the MVP of 1992's Double-A All-Star Game. On June 13, 1993, Tanyon Sturtze no-hit Chattanooga, 5–0.[8]

Following the 1993 season, Larry Schmittou sold the Stars to Don Mincher and a group of Huntsville investors for an asking price between US$3.5 million and $4 million.[9] After missing the playoffs in 1993, the Stars won the 1994 first half and then defeated Chattanooga for the Western Division title, 3–1. Huntsville won its second Southern League championship, 3–1, against the Carolina Mudcats. Manager of the Year Gary Jones' 1994 club set a franchise record with their 81–57 (.587) season.[5]


The Stars did not return to the postseason until 1997. They won the second half before beating the Mobile BayBears, 3–2, to win the Western Division before ultimately losing the championship to the Greenville Braves, 3–2. Right fielder Ben Grieve was the league MVP, and shortstop Mike Coolbaugh won MVP honors at that summer's Double-A All-Star Game. The 1998 team qualified for the playoffs with the second-best record behind Mobile, which had won both halves, but was swept, 3–0, by the BayBears in the Western Division finals.

After the 1998 season, the Oakland Athletics transferred their Double-A affiliation to the Midland RockHounds of the Texas League.[10] Through 14 years with the Athletics, the Stars had amassed a record of 1,029–961 (.517).

Milwaukee Brewers (1999–2014)

After the Stars and Athletics parted ways, Huntsville became the Double-A affiliate of the Milwaukee Brewers.[11] The Stars struggled in their first two seasons of the new affiliation, failing to win any half of the seasons.

In 2000, Mincher became Interim President of the Southern League when President Arnold Fielkow left for the National Football League. At the conclusion of the 2000 season, Mincher and his group put the Stars up for sale once again. He resigned from his position as President of the Stars, and the Southern League removed the "interim" tag to make him league president for 2001. Pulling double duty until the team was sold, Mincher desired to keep the Stars in Huntsville. The group waded through countless offers to buy the Stars looking to find the right investors who would commit to keeping the team in the Tennessee Valley. Early in 2001, Mincher found his man in New York attorney Miles Prentice who also owned the Midland RockHounds, served as a Director for the Texas League, and was the Chairman of the Board of Trustees for Minor League Baseball. Prentice promised to keep the team in Huntsville despite several offers for new stadiums in various locales.

The Stars returned to the playoffs in 2001. Winning the First Half Western Division title, the team went on to win the division against Birmingham, 3–2. The September 11 attacks prompted the cancellation of the championship series before it could begin. Both Huntsville and the Eastern Division champion Jacksonville Suns were declared co-champions. Third baseman Dave Gibralter won the MVP Award for that summer's Double-A All-Star Game.[12]

In 2003, the first-half champion Stars won the Western Division versus Birmingham, 3–2, but lost in the Southern League championship series to Carolina, 3–2. Third baseman Corey Hart won the Southern League MVP Award, and manager Frank Kremblas was the league's Manager of the Year.[5] Missing the playoffs in 2004 and 2005, they made another championship attempt in 2006, winning the second half, defeating Chattanooga, 3–0, for the Northern Division title, but losing the league crown to the Montgomery Biscuits, 3–1. In 2007, Stars manager Don Money was named the Southern League's Manager of the Year.[5] Also in 2007, the team captured the division title, beating the Tennessee Smokies, 3–2, but were again defeated by Montgomery in the finals, 3–2.

To start the 2008 season, the Stars set a new team record for best start, by sweeping their first series with the Mississippi Braves, 5–0.[13] On April 26, 2008, the Stars turned their second triple play in franchise history, the last coming in 2002. David Welch pitched a 7-inning no-hitter against Chattanooga on June 2, 2008.[8] The Stars won the 2009 first half title but lost the Northern Division to Tennessee, 3–1. Sub-.500 teams from 2010 to 2013 failed to reach the playoffs, the longest postseason drought in team history. During this stretch, however, Wily Peralta won the 2011 Southern League Most Outstanding Pitcher Award and first baseman Hunter Morris won the 2012 MVP Award.[5] On August 2, 2012, Jimmy Nelson, Dan Merklinger, R. J. Seidel, Darren Byrd, and Brandon Kintzler pitched a combined no-hitter against Chattanooga, a 3–1 win.[8] Merklinger walked four batters in the fifth inning for the only Lookouts run of the game.[14]

Prior to the 2014 season, an ownership group based in Biloxi, Mississippi, led by Ken Young purchased the team with the intention of relocating the club.[15] The Stars played the 2014 season in Huntsville, while a new ballpark was built in Biloxi. In their 30th and final season in Huntsville, the Stars won the first half title, but lost in the Northern Division series to Chattanooga, 3–2. Over 16 years as a Brewers affiliate, Huntsville compiled a record of 1,083–1,138 (.488). The franchise's composite record over their entire 30-year run stood at 2,112–2,099 (.502).

Because of delays in the construction of Biloxi's MGM Park, the Biloxi Shuckers, as the team was named, played their first 54 games on the road, including 15 at Joe Davis Stadium in April and May 2015 before their June 6 home opener in Biloxi.[16][17]

Season-by-season results

Table key
League The team's final position in the league standings
Division The team's final position in the divisional standings
GB Games behind the team that finished in first place in the division that season
League champions League champions
Division champions Division champions
* Postseason berth
Season-by-season results
Season Division Regular season Postseason MLB affiliate Ref.
Record Win % League Division GB Record Win % Result
1985
League champions Division champions *
Western 78–66 .542 4th 2nd ​1 1⁄2 6–3 .667 Won First Half Western Division title
Won Western Division title vs. Knoxville Blue Jays, 3–1
Won SL championship vs. Charlotte O's, 3–2
[18]
Oakland Athletics [19]
1986
Division champions *
Western 78–63 .553 1st 1st β€” 5–4 .556 Won First Half Western Division title
Won Western Division title vs. Knoxville Blue Jays, 3–1

Lost SL championship vs. Columbus Astros, 3–2[18]
Oakland Athletics [20]
1987
*
Western 74–70 .514 3rd 1st β€” 0–3 .000 Won Second Half Western Division title
Lost Western Division title vs. Birmingham Barons, 3–0[18]
Oakland Athletics [21]
1988 Western 59–85 .410 10th 5th ​22 1⁄2 β€” β€” β€” Oakland Athletics [22]
1989
*
Western 82–61 .573 2nd 2nd 6 1–3 .250 Won Second Half Western Division title
Lost Western Division title vs. Birmingham Barons, 3–1[18]
Oakland Athletics [23]
1990 Western 79–65 .549 3rd 1st β€” β€” β€” β€” Oakland Athletics [24]
1991 Western 61–83 .424 9th (tie) 4th (tie) ​16 1⁄2 β€” β€” β€” Oakland Athletics [25]
1992
*
Western 81–63 .563 3rd 2nd ​9 1⁄2 1–3 .250 Lost Western Division title vs. Chattanooga Lookouts, 3–1[18] Oakland Athletics [26]
1993 Western 71–70 .504 6th (tie) 4th ​6 1⁄2 β€” β€” β€” Oakland Athletics [27]
1994
League champions Division champions *
Western 81–57 .587 1st 1st β€” 6–1 .857 Won First Half Western Division title
Won Western Division title vs. Chattanooga Lookouts, 3–0
Won SL championship vs. Carolina Mudcats, 3–1
[18]
Oakland Athletics [28]
1995 Western 70–74 .486 6th 3rd ​13 1⁄2 β€” β€” β€” Oakland Athletics [29]
1996 Western 66–74 .471 7th 5th ​15 1⁄2 β€” β€” β€” Oakland Athletics [30]
1997
Division champions *
Western 77–62 .554 1st 1st β€” 5–5 .500 Won Second Half Western Division title
Won Western Division title vs. Mobile BayBears, 3–2

Lost SL championship vs. Greenville Braves, 3–2[18]
Oakland Athletics [31]
1998
*
Western 72–68 .514 3rd 2nd 14 0–3 .000 Lost Western Division title vs. Mobile Bay Bears, 3–0[18] Oakland Athletics [32]
1999 Western 64–77 .454 8th 5th 20 β€” β€” β€” Milwaukee Brewers [33]
2000 Western 64–75 .460 9th (tie) 5th ​16 1⁄2 β€” β€” β€” Milwaukee Brewers [34]
2001
League champions Division champions *
Western 75–63 .543 4th 3rd 4 3–2 .600 Won First Half Western Division title
Won Western Division title vs. Birmingham Barons, 3–2
SL championship vs. Jacksonville Suns canceled due to September 11 attacks.
Both teams are declared co-champions.
[18]
Milwaukee Brewers [35]
2002 Western 70–69 .504 5th 4th ​8 1⁄2 β€” β€” β€” Milwaukee Brewers [36]
2003
Division champions *
Western 75–63 .543 2nd 1st β€” 5–5 .500 Won First Half Western Division title
Won Western Division title vs. Birmingham Barons, 3–2

Lost SL championship vs. Carolina Mudcats, 3–2[18]
Milwaukee Brewers [37]
2004 Western 65–75 .464 8th 4th ​8 1⁄2 β€” β€” β€” Milwaukee Brewers [38]
2005 Northern 60–79 .432 8th 4th 23 β€” β€” β€” Milwaukee Brewers [39]
2006
Division champions *
Northern 67–71 .486 6th 4th 13 4–3 .571 Won Second Half Northern Division title
Won Northern Division title vs. Chattanooga Lookouts, 3–0

Lost SL championship vs. Montgomery Biscuits, 3–1[18]
Milwaukee Brewers [40]
2007
Division champions *
Northern 75–62 .547 3rd 1st β€” 5–5 .500 Won First and Second Half Northern Division titles
Won Northern Division title vs. Tennessee Smokies, 3–2

Lost SL championship vs. Montgomery Biscuits, 3–2[18]
Milwaukee Brewers [41]
2008 Northern 73–67 .521 4th 2nd 7 β€” β€” β€” Milwaukee Brewers [42]
2009
*
Northern 63–75 .457 9th 4th 7 1–3 .250 Won First Half Northern Division title
Lost Northern Division title vs. Tennessee Smokies, 3–1[18]
Milwaukee Brewers [43]
2010 Northern 67–73 .479 6th 3rd ​19 1⁄2 β€” β€” β€” Milwaukee Brewers [44]
2011 Northern 64–73 .467 8th 4th ​17 1⁄2 β€” β€” β€” Milwaukee Brewers [45]
2012 Northern 65–74 .468 8th 4th ​13 1⁄2 β€” β€” β€” Milwaukee Brewers [46]
2013 Northern 59–79 .428 8th (tie) 4th 17 β€” β€” β€” Milwaukee Brewers [47]
2014
*
Northern 77–63 .550 4th 1st β€” 2–3 .400 Won First Half Northern Division title
Lost Northern Division title vs. Chattanooga Lookouts, 3–2[18]
Milwaukee Brewers [48]
Totals β€” 2,112–2,099 .502 β€” β€” β€” 44–46 .489 β€” β€” β€”
Franchise totals by affiliation
Affiliation Regular season Postseason
Record Win % Appearances Record Win %
Oakland Athletics (1985–1998) 1,029–961 .517 8 24–25 .490
Milwaukee Brewers (1999–2014) 1,083–1,138 .488 6 20–21 .488
Totals 2,112–2,099 .502 14 44–46 .489

Ballpark

For the entirety of their 30-year history in Huntsville, the Stars played at Joe W. Davis Stadium. The ballpark, which opened in 1985, had a seating capacity of 10,200 in 2010 and 13 skyboxes.[49][50]

Achievements

Retired numbers

  • 5 – Don Mincher, general manager (1985–2001) and owner (1994–2001), Retired June 6, 2008[51]
  • 42 – Jackie Robinson, Retired throughout professional baseball on April 15, 1997.[52]

Hall of Famers

Five people associated with the Stars have been inducted in the Southern League Hall of Fame.[53] Don Mincher, general manager from 1985 to 2000 and part owner from 1994 to 2000,[54] and Rosemary Hovatter, who worked as an administrative assistant and box office employee from 1985 to 2014,[55] were inducted in the inaugural Hall of Fame Class in 2014.[53] Second baseman/shortstop Scott Brosius, inducted in 2015, played for the Stars in 1989 and 1990,[56] and led the Southern League in his second season with 162 hits, 274 total bases, and 39 doubles, earning him a spot on the 1990 postseason all-star team.[53] He went on to an 11-year MLB career, winning three World Series and the 1998 World Series MVP Award with the New York Yankees.[53] Larry Schmittou, who helped bring baseball to Huntsville in 1985 and was part owner of the Stars from 1985 to 1993, was inducted in 2016.[53] Broadcaster Curt Bloom, the team's Director of Broadcasting in 1991, was inducted in 2018.[57]

Notable former players

References

  • "Southern League Champions". Southern League. August 3, 2007. Retrieved August 3, 2007.
  1. ^ "Huntsville Stars". Bush League Factor. June 20, 2009. Archived from the original on January 29, 2010. Retrieved May 21, 2010.
  2. ^ Bibb, John (July 12, 1984). "Big Leagues Next: Schmittou". The Tennessean. Nashville. p. 1-F. Retrieved April 25, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ a b c d e Woody, Larry (1996). Schmittou: A Grand Slam in Baseball, Business, and Life. Nashville: Eggmann Publishing Company. pp. 101–102. ISBN 1-886371-33-4.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
  4. ^ a b "Southern League Past Champions". Southern League. Minor League Baseball. Retrieved April 28, 2020.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g "Southern League Award Winners". Southern League. Minor League Baseball. Retrieved April 28, 2020.
  6. ^ "Sounds Silence Stars". The Greenville News. Greenville. July 24, 1986. p. 3D – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "SL Sets First All-Star Tilt". The Orlando Sentinel. Orlando. July 11, 1991. p. B-4 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ a b c d "Southern League All-Time No-Hitters". Southern League. Minor League Baseball. Retrieved April 30, 2020.
  9. ^ "Schmittou Sells Stars". The Tennessean. Nashville. November 13, 1993. p. 3C. Retrieved April 29, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ "DeFrancesco Assigned To Midland as First RockHounds Field Manager". The Odessa American. Odessa. November 19, 1998. p. 3D. Retrieved April 29, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ "Brewers Move To Huntsville". Ironwood Daily Globe. Ironwood. September 16, 1998. p. 10. Retrieved April 29, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ Point, Michael (July 12, 2001). "A Night of Fireworks". Austin American-Statesman. Austin. p. C1 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ Pollock, Brett. "Stars Start Season With Series Sweep." Huntsville Stars. April 7, 2008. Retrieved on June 22, 2009.
  14. ^ Dykstra, Sam. "Nelson, Huntsville No-Hit Chattanooga". Southern League. Minor League Baseball. Archived from the original on March 24, 2016. Retrieved April 30, 2020.
  15. ^ "Groundbreaking Set for Biloxi Stadium". Clarion-Ledger. Jackson. January 18, 2014. p. 10A. Retrieved April 29, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  16. ^ "Shuckers Firsts" (PDF). 2019 Biloxi Shuckers Media Guide. Minor League Baseball. pp. 127–128. Retrieved April 27, 2020.
  17. ^ Reichard, Kevin (February 6, 2015). "Shuckers to Begin Season on Road, in Huntsville". Ballpark Digest. Retrieved April 27, 2020.
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "League Records (1964–present)". 2019 Southern League Media Guide. Southern League. pp. 134–139. Retrieved April 20, 2020.
  19. ^ "1985 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  20. ^ "1986 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  21. ^ "1987 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  22. ^ "1988 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  23. ^ "1989 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  24. ^ "1990 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  25. ^ "1991 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  26. ^ "1992 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  27. ^ "1993 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  28. ^ "1994 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  29. ^ "1995 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  30. ^ "1996 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  31. ^ "1997 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  32. ^ "1998 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  33. ^ "1999 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  34. ^ "2000 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  35. ^ "2001 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  36. ^ "2002 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  37. ^ "2003 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  38. ^ "2004 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  39. ^ "2005 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  40. ^ "2006 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  41. ^ "2007 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  42. ^ "2008 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  43. ^ "2009 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  44. ^ "2010 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  45. ^ "2011 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  46. ^ "2012 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  47. ^ "2013 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  48. ^ "2014 Southern League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  49. ^ Knight, Graham (June 9, 2010). "Joe Davis Stadium". Baseball Pilgrimages. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  50. ^ "2010 Media Guide" (PDF). Huntsville Stars. p. 47. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 10, 2012. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  51. ^ "Stars Retire No. 5 in Honor of Mincher". Huntsville Stars. Minor League Baseball. June 6, 2008. Archived from the original on January 17, 2011. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  52. ^ Smith, Claire (April 16, 1997). "A Grand Tribute to Robinson and His Moment". The New York Times. Archived from the original on December 1, 2007. Retrieved October 11, 2008.
  53. ^ a b c d e "Southern League League Hall of Fame". Southern League. Minor League Baseball. Retrieved February 14, 2020.
  54. ^ Aaron, Marc C. "Don Mincher". Society for American Baseball Research. Retrieved January 31, 2020.
  55. ^ McCarter, Mark (May 20, 2014). "Rosemary Hovatter Represents Huntsville Stars in First Southern League Hall of Fame Class". Advance Local. Retrieved January 31, 2020.
  56. ^ "Scott Brosius Minor League Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved January 31, 2020.
  57. ^ "Southern League Announces 2016 HOF Class". Southern League. Minor League Baseball. March 5, 2018. Retrieved April 29, 2020.

External links

Other Languages

Copyright