Intisar el-Zein Soughayroun

Intisar el-Zein Soughayroun
انتصار الزين صغيرون
Minister of Higher Education[1]
Assumed office
September 2019[1]
Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok
Personal details
Born 1957/1958 (age 63–64)[2]
Occupation archeologist[3][2]

Intisar el-Zein Soughayroun[2] (also: Intsar, al-Zein, el-Zein, Sghairyoun, Segayron;[1][4] Arabic: انتصار الزين صغيرون‎) is a professor of archeology at the University of Khartoum.[2] In early September 2019 Soughayroun became the Sudanese Minister for Higher Education in the Transitional Cabinet of Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok, during the 2019 Sudanese transition to democracy.[1]

Archaeological research

Soughayroun is a professor of archaeology at the University of Khartoum.[2] She is involved in ongoing scientific collaboration with the University of Bergen in Norway.[3][2] Her research interests include the archaeology of Islam in Sudan.[5] She has worked on the site of Qasr Wad nimieri, which is 470 km north of Khartoum.[6] She studied for her MA and her PhD at the American University in Cairo, with a doctoral dissertation examining Islamic domed tombs in Sudan; she graduated from her PhD in 1986.[7]

Soughayroun was co-director of the Meroe Archival Project, which was a collaboration between the University of Reading and the University of Khartoum.[8]

Publications include

  • Islamic Archaeology in the Sudan[9]
  • 'Ottoman Archaeology of the Middle Nile Valley in the Sudan', in The Frontiers of the Ottoman World[10]

2018–2019 Sudanese protests

Soughayroun participated in the 2018–2019 Sudanese protests. One of her nephews was killed in the 3 June 2019 Khartoum massacre.[2] In early July 2019, she expressed scepticism regarding negotiations with the Transitional Military Council, based on past experience, and supported continued civil disobedience. She felt that the TMC was weakening in power.[2]

Minister of Higher Education

In early September 2019, Soughayroun was appointed as the Minister of Higher Education of Sudan[1] (or head of the Higher Education and Scientific Research Council[11]) in the Transitional Cabinet of Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok, during the 2019 Sudanese transition to democracy.[12] Other women leaders of Sudan during the transitional period include Chief Justice Nemat Abdullah Khair, and Sovereignty Council members Aisha Musa el-Said and Raja Nicola.[13]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e "FFC, Hamdok reach deal on Sudan's transitional cabinet". Sudan Tribune. 4 September 2019. Archived from the original on 4 September 2019. Retrieved 5 September 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Hellesund, Dag (5 July 2019). "På forskningsopphold i Bergen: Litt mer optimist før hjemreise til Sudan" [On a research visit to Bergen: A little more optimistic before returning to Sudan]. Khrono (in Norwegian). Archived from the original on 5 September 2019. Retrieved 6 September 2019.
  3. ^ a b Ahmed, Abdul Rahman Ali; Ahmed, Salah eldin Mohamed; Soughayroun, Intisar el-Zein; Håland, Randi (20 May 2015). "Researching and managing the archaeological past in Sudan". Chr. Michelsen Institute. Archived from the original on 5 September 2019. Retrieved 6 September 2019.
  4. ^ "Prime Minister Hamdouk presents new Sudanese government". Radio Dabanga. 6 September 2019. Archived from the original on 6 September 2019. Retrieved 6 September 2019.
  5. ^ Henrihafsakos (20 May 2015). "Sudan Week in Bergen, Day 2: Cultural heritage: The politics of remembering, redefining, and forgetting the meaning of past cultural products". Archived from the original on 6 September 2019. Retrieved 6 September 2019.
  6. ^ El-Zein, I.S., 2010. Qasr Wad Nimeiri and its qubbas. Sudan and Nubia, 14, pp.91-95.
  7. ^ Edwards, David N.; Osman, Ali; Tahir, Yahia Fadl; Sadig, Azhari Mustafa; el-Zein, Intisar Soghayroun (1 December 2012). "On a Nubian frontier — landscapes of settlement on the Third Cataract of the Nile, Sudan". Azania: Archaeological Research in Africa. 47 (4): 450–487. doi:10.1080/0067270X.2012.727615. ISSN 0067-270X. S2CID 154588776.
  8. ^ "Meroe Archival Project News". www.baruch.cuny.edu. Retrieved 8 July 2020.
  9. ^ Elzein, Intisar Soghayroun. (2004). Islamic archaeology in the Sudan. Oxford, England: Archaeopress. ISBN 1-84171-639-1. OCLC 57281621.
  10. ^ Elzein, Intisar (3 December 2009). The Frontiers of the Ottoman World. British Academy. doi:10.5871/bacad/9780197264423.003.0019. ISBN 978-0-19-726442-3.
  11. ^ "Hamdok delays formation of Sudan's transitional government". Sudan Tribune. 29 August 2019. Archived from the original on 29 August 2019. Retrieved 29 August 2019.
  12. ^ "A New Academic Freedom Report Describes Worldwide Attacks on Higher Education". Al-Fanar Media. 19 November 2019. Retrieved 8 July 2020.
  13. ^ "EISA Sudan: Government members". www.eisa.org.za. Retrieved 8 July 2020.

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