Karin Rask

Karin Rask
Born
Karin Lätsim

(1979-04-21) 21 April 1979 (age 39)
Nationality Estonian
Occupation Actress
Years active 2001–present
Spouse(s) Rasmus Rask
Children 2

Karin Rask (until 2005, Karin Lätsim; born 21 April 1979) is an Estonian stage, film and television actress, theatre teacher and clothing designer.

Early life and education

Karin Rask was born as Karin Lätsim in Haapsalu, in Lääne County in 1979.[1] She attended secondary school at Haapsalu Gymnasium, graduating in 1997. From 1997 until 1998, she studied radio and program direction at Tallinn Pedagogical University (now, Tallinn University). In 2002, she graduated from the Higher Theatre School (now, the Estonian Academy of Music and Theatre) in Tallinn.[2] Among her graduating classmates were Priit Võigemast, Ott Aardam, Maria Soomets, Hele Kõre, Mart Toome, Evelin Võigemast, Elisabet Reinsalu, and Argo Aadli.[3]

Stage career

In 2002, shortly after graduation, Rask (then known by her birth name, Lätsim) joined the Estonian Puppet and Youth Theatre (also called the Estonian State Puppet Theatre. More commonly called the NUKU theatre) in Tallinn's Old Town. She would remain with the NUKU until 2014.[4] Roles at the NUKU include works by such Estonian authors and playwrights, and as: Ivar Põllu, Paul-Eerik Rummo, Triin Voorel, Andrus Kivirähk, Andres Roosileht, Kalju Kangur, Urmas Lennuk, and Eno Raud. Roles in productions of international playwrights and authors include those of: Anders Byström, Judy Upton, Gianni Rodari, the Brothers Grimm, Selma Lagerlöf, Jim Jacobs and Warren Casey.[5]

After her departure from the NUKU theatre, Rask became a freelance actress. She has performed in roles at the Estonian Drama Theatre in Tallinn, the Theatre Randlane in Haapsalu, and the Von Krahl Theatre in Tallinn, among others. Rask is currently involved with the Polygon theatre, based in Tallinn, where she is both an actress and theatre teacher.[6]

Television and film

Rask's first feature film debut (credited as Karin Lätsim) was a small role in the 2002 Elmo Nüganen directed war drama Nimed marmortahvlil, which focuses on a group of young men fighting in the 1918–1920 Estonian War of Independence. The film was based on the 1936 novel of the same name by Albert Kivikas. In 2007, she appeared in another small role in the Dirk Hoyer directed crime drama Võõras. In 2015, Rask appeared in the Margus Paju directed family adventure film Supilinna Salaselts and the following year played the role of Simone in the René Vilbre directed Taska Film comedy Klassikokkutulek.[7] Beginning in 2015, Rask starred on the TV3 thriller Varjudemaa. The series follows Rask's character Rita Metsallik as she returns home to the small village on a fictional island where she grew up after living in Tallinn for twenty years to bury her deceased father, only to discover that his death was not an accident.[8]

She has also appeared in a number of film shorts, most notably 2015's drama Tiibadeta piloot, directed by Leeni Linna and pairing Rask with actor Priit Võigemast.[9]

Rask has also appeared on several Estonian television series; most notably as Lucy on the TV3 drama Kodu keset linna in 2003, and again from 2005 to 2006;[10] as Triin Mets on the popular Kanal 2 crime drama Kelgukoerad from 2007 until 2008;[11] and as Kiku on the TV3 drama Nurjatud tüdrukud in 2012.[12] Other appearances on television series include three appearances on the TV3 comedy crime series Kättemaksukontor in 2009 and 2013, and a 2014 appearance on the Kanal 2 crime drama Viimane võmm. In 2017, she had a starring role as Eva in the Kanal 2 drama-mystery series Nukumaja.[13]

Clothing designer

In 2013, Rask began designing clothes for children. She initially came up with the idea after designing and creating clothing for her daughter. After several people began to enquire about the clothes, Rask began making clothing for others. Eventually, she started a clothing line called Kalamaja Printsess. All of the fabrics are recycled and repurposed from surplus or salvaged from old clothing, curtains and other fabrics and each outfit is unique.[14][15]

Personal life

In August 2005, Karin Lätsim married lawyer Rasmus Rask.[16] The couple have two children, a son born in 2006, and a daughter born in 2009. The family reside in Tallinn.[17] Since her marriage, she has used her married surname, Rask.[18]

References

  1. ^ vana.laanlane.ee Haapsalust pärit näitleja Karin Rask esitleb Pärnu moealleel oma lasterõivaste kollektsiooni 19 August 2014. Retrieved 6 January 2017.
  2. ^ Õhtuleht "Naised": Karin Rask – seksikate meeste partner 21 September 2008. Retrieved 6 January 2017
  3. ^ Tallinna Linnateater Seitse venda Retrieved 15 March 2017.
  4. ^ Eesti Teatri Agentuur Statistika Retrieved 6 January 2017.
  5. ^ annabi.ee Karin Raski elulugu Retrieved 6 January 2017.
  6. ^ Polygon Retrieved 6 January 2017.
  7. ^ Eesti Filmi Andmebaas. Retrieved 6 January 2017.
  8. ^ delfi.ee Hollywoodilik "Varjudemaa" alustab juba täna 2 October 2015. Retrieved 6 January 2017.
  9. ^ Postimees Galerii: Lühifilmide kasseti "Lennud unes või ilmsi" esilinastus Solarises 10 October 2015. Retrieved 6 January 2017.
  10. ^ Õhtuleht Karin Rask saab emaks 25 April 2006. Retrieved 6 January 2017.
  11. ^ delfi.ee Krimisarjas "Kelgukoerad" valitseb naistevaesus 6 August 2009. Retrieved 6 January 2017.
  12. ^ Postimees Nurjatud tüdrukud jätkub täna: pedagoogi salasuhe ja geiküsimus 12 September 2012. Retrieved 6 January 2017.
  13. ^ Postimess Kättemaksukontori saatanlikus mõrvaloos näeb Karin Raski 19 November 2009. Retrieved 6 January 2016.
  14. ^ Postimees Näitlejanna Karin Rask loob Uuskasutuskeskuse vanadest kardinatest printsessikleite 25 March 2016. Retrieved 6 January 2017.
  15. ^ delfi.ee Ohoo! Näitleja Karin Rask hakkas moeloojaks 20 August 2014. Retrieved 6 January 2017.
  16. ^ Õhtulet Karin Lätsim ja Rasmus Rask abiellusid 16 August 2005. Retrieved 6 January 2017.
  17. ^ Postimees Karin Rask ja Merle Liivak kutsuvad annetama imetamisnõustamise toetuseks 5 March 2015. Retrieved 6 January 2017.
  18. ^ Õhtuleht Näitleja Karin Lätsim abiellub Ammende villas 9 August 2005. Retrieved 6 January 2017.

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