Lady Lucy Whitmore

Lucy Elizabeth Georgiana Whitmore
Born Lucy Elizabeth Georgiana Bridgeman
22 January 1792
England
Died 17 March 1840(1840-03-17) (aged 48)
Resting place Quatt, Shropshire, England
Occupation noblewoman, hymwriter
Language English
Nationality British
Genre hymns
Subject Christianity
Notable works "Father, again in Jesus' name we meet"
Spouse
Relatives Orlando Bridgeman, 1st Earl of Bradford; George Byng, 4th Viscount Torrington; George Augustus Frederick Henry Bridgeman, 2nd Earl of Bradford; Charles Orlando Bridgeman

Lady Lucy Whitmore (22 January 1792 – 17 March 1840) was an English noblewoman and a hymn writer.

Early years

Lucy Elizabeth Georgiana Bridgeman was born on 22 January 1792. She was the only daughter of Orlando, 2nd Baron and 1st Earl of Bradford. Her mother was Lucy Elizabeth Byng (1760–1844), the eldest daughter of George Byng, 4th Viscount Torrington. She had four siblings, all brothers, namely:George Augustus Frederick Henry Bridgeman, 2nd Earl of Bradford; Vice-Admiral the Hon. Charles Orlando Bridgeman; Hon. Orlando Henry Bridgeman; and Reverend Hon. Henry Edmund Bridgeman.[1]

Whitmore was a friend of Lady Louisa Cadogan.[2]

Career

Dudmaston Hall

On 29 January 1810 she married William Wolryche-Whitmore,[3] of Dudmaston Hall, Shropshire. She published, Family prayers for every day in the week : selected from various portions of the Holy Bible with references. To which are added, a few prayers for persons in private ; and fourteen original hymns in 1824, containing the lyrics to fourteen original hymns with a second edition in 1827. Number eight of these hymns was "Father, again in Jesus' name we meet", and it passed into many collections.[4] Suitable for Lent, this hymn appeared to be the only one known or used towards the end of the 19th-century.[5]

Whitmore died childless on 17 March 1840 and was buried at Quatt.[4][3]

"Father, again in Jesus' name we meet"

"Father, again in Jesus' name we meet" (1824)

"Father, again in Jesus' name we meet,
And bow in penitence beneath thy feet;
Again to thee our feeble voices raise,
To sue for mercy, and to sing thy praise.

"Alas! unworthy of thy boundless love,
Too oft with careless feet from thee we rove;
But now, encouraged by thy voice we come,
Returning sinners, to a Father's home.

"Oh by His name in whom all fulness dwells,
Oh by his love which every love excels,
Oh by his blood so freely shed for sin,
Open blessed mercy's gate, and take us in."

Selected works

  • Family prayers for every day in the week : selected from various portions of the Holy Bible with references. To which are added, a few prayers for persons in private ; and fourteen original hymns, 1824
  • Sunday reading for very little boys and girls, 1832
  • Morning and evening prayers, 1869

References

  1. ^ Baron-Wilson 1844, p. 156.
  2. ^ O'Rorke 1917, p. 37.
  3. ^ a b Staffordshire Record Society 1899, p. 284.
  4. ^ a b Julian 1892, p. 1085.
  5. ^ Pitman 1892, p. 331.

Bibliography

  • This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Baron-Wilson, Margaret (1844). The Illustrated belle assemblée and magazine of costumes, ed. by mrs. C. Baron-Wilson. I, No. 3 (Public domain ed.). London: Thomas Sloper.
  • This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Julian, John (1892). A Dictionary of Hymnology: Setting Forth the Origin and History of Christian Hymns of All Ages and Nations...with Biographical and Critical Notices of Their Authors and Translators (Public domain ed.). J. Murray.
  • This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: O'Rorke, Lucy Elizabeth Marshall (1917). The Life and Friendships of Catherine Marsh (Public domain ed.). Longmans, Green.
  • This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Pitman, Emma Raymond (1892). Lady Hymn Writers (Public domain ed.). T. Nelson and sons.
  • This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Staffordshire Record Society (1899). Collections for a History of Staffordshire (Public domain ed.). Staffordshire Record Society.

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