List of presidents of the Government of Catalonia

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This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Catalonia

The list of presidents of the Government of Catalonia compiles the official list of presidents of the Generalitat de Catalunya since its inception in 1359 to present time.[1] It has been the traditional way of listing presidents, starting with Berenguer de Cruïlles.[2][3][4] The most recent stable version of the list dates from 2003, by Josep M. Solé i Sabaté in his work Historia de la Generalitat de Catalunya i dels seus presidents.[5] The procedure to set up this list is the following: for the period of the medieval Generalitat (Deputation of the General),[6] the president was the most eminent ecclesiastic deputy of the Deputation of the General of Catalonia (popularly known as Generalitat),[7] a body of the Catalan Courts dissolved in 1716 and reinstated for two years in 1874. From April 1931 on, the list includes the elected presidents as well as the proclaimed exiled presidents during the Francoist dictatorship.[8] The functions of the President of the Government of Catalonia have varied considerably over history, in parallel with the attributions of the Generalitat itself.[9]

Deputation of the General or Generalitat (1359–1716)

Fourteenth century

Here follows a list of representatives of catalan institutions through the ages. The Presidents as such first appeared with the modern Generalitat in the 20th century.

  1. Berenguer de Cruïlles, Bishop of Girona (1359–1366)
  2. Romeu Sescomes, Bishop of Lleida (1363–1364)
  3. Ramon Gener (1364–1365)
  4. Bernat Vallès, canon of Barcelona (1365–1367)
    Romeu Sescomes, Bishop of Lleida (1375–1376)
  5. Joan I d'Empúries (1376)
  6. Guillem de Guimerà i d'Abella, Grand Prior of the Hospitaller Order of St. John of Jerusalem (1376–1377)
  7. Galceren de Besora i de Cartellà, almoner of Ripoll (1377–1378)
    Ramon Gener (1379–1380)
  8. Felip d'Anglesola, canon of Tarragona (1380)
  9. Pere de Santamans, canon of Tortosa (1381–1383)
  10. Arnau Descolomer, cleric from Girona (1384–1389)
  11. Miquel de Santjoan, canon of Girona (1389–1396)
  12. Alfons de Tous, canon of Barcelona (1396–1413)

Fifteenth century

Sixteenth century

Seventeenth century

Eighteenth century

Modern Generalitat (1931–present)

Second Republic and exile (1931–1977)

Governments:

  •   ERC
  •   War cabinet
  •   Mixed coalition
Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term of office Party Government Election President
(Tenure)
Ref.
Took office Left office Duration Cabinet name Composition
Macia 2a tongada scans 003 editora 8 44 1.jpg Francesc Macià
(1859–1933)
14 April
1931
14 December
1932
2 years and 255 days ERC Macià I Provisional
ERCUSCUGTPRRPCR
N/A President
Niceto
Alcalá-Zamora

Coat of Arms of Spain (1931-1939).svg
(1931–1936)
14 December
1932
25 December
1933dagger
Macià II ERC 1932
Lluis Companys.jpg Lluís Companys
(1882–1940)
25 December
1933
31 July
1936
6 years and 295 days ERC Companys I ERCUSCACR • PNRE
President
Manuel Azaña
Coat of Arms of Spain (1931-1939).svg
(1936–1939)
31 July
1936
15 October
1940dagger
(assassinated)
Companys II War
ERCPSUCUR
UGTACR
CNT from Sep 1936
Irla bb.jpg Josep Irla
(1874–1958)
15 October
1940
7 August
1954
13 years and 235 days ERC None In exile N/A Spanish Republican
government in exile

(1939–1977)
(Josep Tarradellas) Adolfo Suárez junto al presidente de la Generalitat de Cataluña a su llegada a Barcelona. Pool Moncloa. 24 de febrero de 1979 (cropped) (cropped).jpeg Josep Tarradellas
(1899–1988)
7 August
1954
18 October
1977
23 years and 72 days ERC

Restored autonomy (1977–present)

Governments:

Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term of office Party Government Election Monarch
(Reign)
Ref.
Took office Left office Duration Cabinet name Composition
(Josep Tarradellas) Adolfo Suárez junto al presidente de la Generalitat de Cataluña a su llegada a Barcelona. Pool Moncloa. 24 de febrero de 1979 (cropped) (cropped).jpeg Josep Tarradellas
(1899–1988)
18 October
1977
29 April
1980
2 years and 194 days ERC Tarradellas Provisional
PSCERCPSUC
CDCUCD
N/A King
Juan Carlos I
Coat of Arms of Spain.svg
(1975–2014)
[10]
[11]
Jordi Pujol 1996 (cropped).jpg Jordi Pujol
(born 1930)
29 April
1980
13 June
1984
23 years and 233 days CDC Pujol I CDCUDC
(minority government
supp. by CC–UCD and ERC)
1980 [12]
[13]
[14]
[15]
[16]
[17]
[18]
13 June
1984
1 July
1988
Pujol II CDCUDC
ERC until Feb 1987
1984
1 July
1988
13 April
1992
Pujol III 1988
13 April
1992
21 December
1995
Pujol IV 1992
21 December
1995
24 November
1999
Pujol V CDCUDC
(minority government
supp. by PP 1999–2003)
1995
24 November
1999
18 December
2003
Pujol VI 1999
Pasqual Maragall 2004 (cropped).jpg Pasqual Maragall
(born 1941)
18 December
2003
28 November
2006
2 years and 345 days PSC Maragall Tripartite
PSCERCICV
2003 [19]
[20]
PSCICV
(minority government)
José Montilla 2008 (cropped).jpg José Montilla
(born 1955)
28 November
2006
27 December
2010
4 years and 29 days PSC Montilla Tripartite
PSCERCICV
2006 [21]
[22]
Artur Mas 2011 (cropped).jpg Artur Mas
(born 1956)
27 December
2010
24 December
2012
5 years and 16 days CDC Mas I CDCUDC
(minority government
supp. by ERC 2012–2015)
2010 [23]
[24]
[25]
24 December
2012
12 January
2016
Mas II 2012
King
Felipe VI
Coat of Arms of Spain.svg
(2014–present)
CDC
(minority government
supp. by ERC and DC)
Carles Puigdemont 2017 (cropped).jpg Carles Puigdemont
(born 1962)
12 January
2016
28 October
2017
(removed)
1 year and 289 days CDC Puigdemont Junts pel Sí
CDC/PDeCATERC
(minority government
supp. by CUP)
2015 [26]
[27]
PDeCAT
During this interval, the office was suspended. Direct rule over Catalonia N/A [27]
Quim Torra 2018b (cropped).jpg Quim Torra
(born 1962)
16 May
2018
28 September
2020
(disqualified)
2 years and 135 days Independent Torra JxCat/JuntsERC
PDeCAT until Sep 2020
(minority government)
2017 [28]
[29]
During this interval, Vice President Pere Aragonès served as acting officeholder.

Timeline

Pere AragonèsQuim TorraCarles PuigdemontArtur MasJosé MontillaPasqual MaragallJordi PujolJosep TarradellasJosep IrlaLluís CompanysFrancesc Macià

Controversies

Some historians, like Jaume Guillamet, from Pompeu Fabra University, or José Luis Corral, from Zaragoza University, do not consider the medieval Generalitat to be comparable with the contemporary Generalitat. According to them, the Contemporary Generalitat was created within the framework of the Second Spanish Republic (1931–1939), and the current Generalitat is the result of the exercise of self-government of Catalonia within the framework of Spanish democracy. From their perspective, there would only be 10 presidents of the Generalitat: Macià, Companys, Irla, Tarradellas, Pujol, Maragall, Montilla, Mas, Puigdemont and Torra.[30]

In 2015, one Historian wrote an opinion article defending a list of 16 presidents until Artur Mas. What would give a total of 18 presidents counting up to the current president Torra.[31]

In 2018, the association "Historiadors de Catalunya", a Spanish nationalist group, also proposed a list of 10 presidents, but substituting Josep Irla for Francisco Jiménez Arenas: Macià, Companys, Francisco Jiménez Arenas, Tarradellas, Pujol, Maragall, Montilla, Mas, Puigdemont and Torra.[32]

See also

Copyright