Megan Gibson-Loftin

Megan Gibson-Loftin
Megan-Gibson.jpg
Megan Gibson-Loftin (then Megan Gibson) in March 2007.
Current position
Title Pitching coach
Team Houston
Conference The American
Biographical details
Born (1986-03-25) March 25, 1986 (age 34)
Spring, Texas
Playing career
2005–2008 Texas A&M
2008–2009 Philadelphia Force
2009 Denso
2010–2011 Tennessee/NPF Diamonds
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
2011 Texas A&M (volunteer asst.)
2012–2013 UTSA (pitching)
2014–2016 Penn State (pitching)
2017–present Houston (pitching)
Accomplishments and honors
Awards

Megan Lynn Gibson-Loftin (born March 25, 1986) is an American softball coach and former player who is currently the pitching coach at Houston. Originally from Spring, Texas, Gibson-Loftin played college softball at Texas A&M and was selected by the Philadelphia Force as the No. 2 overall pick in the 2008 NPF Senior Draft.[2] After the Force folded she was picked up by the Tennessee Diamonds in 2010.

College career

Born Megan Lynn Gibson in Spring, Texas, Gibson-Loftin played college softball at Texas A&M from 2004 to 2008.[3] In the 2008 season, she was collegiate national player of the week from February 25 to March 2.[4] She led her team to win the program's second Big 12 regular season and first tournament championship. In the postseason, she led her team to the Final Series of the 2008 Women's College World Series. Gibson ended her senior season as runner-up for USA Softball's National Collegiate Player of the Year honors, as a first-team NFCA All-American, and the first player to win both Player of the Year and Pitcher of the Year honors from the Big 12.[5][6][7][8][9]

She graduated from Texas A&M in 2008 with a bachelor's degree in sport management with a minor in business.[10]

Professional playing career

Gibson-Loftin played professional softball for National Pro Fastpitch from 2008 to 2011. The second overall pick in the 2008 NPF draft selected by the Philadelphia Force, Gibson-Loftin played for the Force from 2008 to 2009 and for the Tennessee (later NPF) Diamonds from 2010 to 2011.[11][12] In 2009, Gibson-Loftin played for Denso of Women's Major League Softball in Japan.[10]

Coaching career

Along with her career in the NPF, Gibson served under Texas A&M head coach Jo Evans as a graduate assistant in Fall 2008 and again as a volunteer pitching coach during the 2011 season. She also spent time as a softball instructor at High Performance Baseball in Tomball and as a volunteer assistant coach at Spring High School in 2010.

Gibson joined the Penn State coaching staff after spending two seasons as an assistant under Coach Lehotak at University of Texas at San Antonio.

Personal life

Gibson-Loftin married Lance Loftin, a former professional baseball player who played college baseball at Texas State, in 2015.[10][13]

References

  1. ^ "Tincher named to WCWS All-Tournament Team".
  2. ^ "2008 NPF DRAFT VIDEO" (Press release). Archived from the original on 2009-07-18.
  3. ^ "Megan Gibson". Texas A&M. Archived from the original on February 10, 2009. Retrieved June 26, 2018.
  4. ^ "Texas A&M's Megan Gibson Selected As The USA Softball Collegiate National Player Of The Week". Archived from the original on 2009-07-18. Retrieved 2008-06-04.
  5. ^ "2008 Softball Postseason Awards Announced" (Press release). Archived from the original on 2012-09-06.
  6. ^ "Texas A&M blanks NU in Big 12 title game". Archived from the original on 2008-06-05.
  7. ^ "2008 Louisville Slugger/NFCA Division I All-Americans" (Press release). Archived from the original on 2008-06-02.
  8. ^ Groller, Keith (May 29, 2008). "Going Dutch: Force start season tonight against Netherlands". The Morning Call. Allentown, PA. Archived from the original on June 5, 2008.
  9. ^ Rohde, John (May 31, 2008). "A&M star awaiting her due". The Oklahoman. Archived from the original on July 21, 2009. Retrieved May 31, 2008.
  10. ^ a b c "Megan Gibson-Loftin". UHCougars.com. University of Houston. Retrieved June 26, 2018.
  11. ^ "Megan Gibson". Penn State. Retrieved June 26, 2018.
  12. ^ https://profastpitch.com/rosters/historical-rosters/
  13. ^ "Lance Loftin". baseball-reference.com. Retrieved June 26, 2018.

External links

Other Languages

Copyright