Oskar Anderson

Oskar Anderson
Oskar Anderson.jpg
Oskar Anderson in Tartu (around 1930)
Born
Oskar Johann Viktor Anderson

(1887-08-02)August 2, 1887
Died February 12, 1960(1960-02-12) (aged 72)
Nationality German, Bulgarian, Russian
Alma mater
Known for Variate Difference Method
Spouse(s) Margarethe Natalie von Hindenburg-Hirtenberg[1]
Scientific career
Fields
Institutions
Thesis  (1912)
Academic advisors Alexander Alexandrovich Chuprov

Oskar Johann Viktor Anderson (Russian: Оскар Иоганн Виктор Андерсон; 2 August 1887, Minsk, Russian Empire – 12 February 1960, Munich, Germany) was a Russian-born German mathematician of Baltic German descent. He was most famously known for his work on mathematical statistics and econometrics.

Life

Anderson was born from a Baltic German family in Minsk (now in Belarus), but soon moved to Kazan (Russia). His father, Nikolai Anderson, was professor in Finno-Ugric languages at the University of Kazan.[2] His older brothers were the folklorist Walter Anderson and the astrophysicist Wilhelm Anderson.[3]

Oskar Anderson graduated from Kazan Gymnasium with a gold medal in 1906. After studying mathematics for one year at the University of Kazan, he moved to St. Petersburg to study economics at the Polytechnic Institute.[4][5] From 1907 to 1915, he was Aleksandr Chuprov's student and assistant. In 1912 he started lecturing at a commercial school in St. Petersburg while also studying for a law degree at the University of Saint Petersburg, graduating in 1914.[1]

In 1918 he took on a professorship in Kiev but he was forced to flee Russia in 1920 due to the Russian Revolution, first taking a post in Budapest (Hungary) before becoming a professor at the University of Economics at Varna (Bulgaria) in 1924.

Anderson was one of the charter members of the Econometric Society,[6] whose members also elected him to be a fellow of the society in 1933.[7][6] In the same year he also received a fellowship from the Rockefeller Foundation.[8]

Supported by the foundation, in 1935 he established and became director of the Statistical Institute for Economic Research at the University of Sofia.[9] For the remainder of the decade he also served the League of Nations as an associate member of its Committee of Statistical Experts.[10]

In 1942 he joined the Kiel Institute for the World Economy as head of the Department of Eastern Studies and also took up a full professorship of statistics at the University of Kiel,[1] where he was joined by his brother Walter after the end of the second world war. In 1947 he took a position at the University of Munich, teaching there until 1956, when he retired.

Writings

  • Einführung in die Mathematische Statistik, Wien : Springer-Verlag, 1935, ISBN 978-3-7091-5873-9 [11]
  • Über die repräsentative Methode und deren Anwendung auf die Aufarbeitung der Ergbnisse der bulgarischen landwirtschaftlichen Betriebszählung vom 31. Dezember 1926, München : Bayer. Statist. Landesamt [de], 1949
  • Die Saisonschwankungen in der deutschen Stromproduktion vor und nach dem Kriege , München : Inst. f. Wirtschaftsforschung, 1950

External links

  • Jörg Siebels; Kerstin Nees. "Oskar Anderson". Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Famous scholars from Kiel. Retrieved 2018-10-26.

References/Further reading

  1. ^ a b c d e Strecker, Heinrich; Strecker, Rosemarie (2016). "Oskar Anderson". Encyclopedia of Mathematics. Springer-Verlag GmbH, Heidelberg.
  2. ^ "Формулярный списокь (service record): Николай Андерсон (Nikolai Anderson)", Oskar Nikolaevich Anderson (1907-1912) (in Russian), St. Petersburg: Archives of the Petrograd Polytechnical Institute of the Emperor Peter the Great in the Central State Historical Archives of St. Petersburg, pp. 9–18, retrieved 2018-10-27
  3. ^ Рафикова (Rafikova), Г. (G.); Ибрагимова (Ibrahimova), Ф. (F.) (2016). "Биографика Казанского университета: Андерсоны (Kazan University Biography: Anderson)". «Гасырлар авазы – Эхо веков» (in Russian). 2016 1/2.
  4. ^ Оскар Николаевич Андерсон (1907-1912) / Oskar Nikolaevich Anderson (1907-1912) (in Russian), St. Petersburg: Archives of the Petrograd Polytechnical Institute of the Emperor Peter the Great in the Central State Historical Archives of St. Petersburg, TsGIASpb 478 1 64, retrieved 2018-10-27
  5. ^ Андерсон Оскар Николаевич - стипендиат (1912-1914) / Oskar Nikolaevich Anderson - scholarship holder (1912-1914) (in Russian), St. Petersburg: Archives of the Petrograd Polytechnical Institute of the Emperor Peter the Great in the Central State Historical Archives of St. Petersburg, TsGIASpb 478 23 5, retrieved 2018-10-27
  6. ^ a b Fels, Eberhard (1961). "Oskar Anderson, 1887-1960". Econometrica. 29 (1): 74–79. doi:10.2307/1907689. JSTOR 1907689. Retrieved 2018-11-07.
  7. ^ "In Memoriam". List of Deceased Fellows of the Econometric Society. Archived from the original on March 22, 2013. Retrieved December 1, 2012.
  8. ^ Faure, Justine (2012), The Rockefeller Foundation Fellows in Social Sciences: Transnational Networks and Construction of Disciplines — The Example of East Central Europe, Rockefeller Archive Center
  9. ^ Avramov, Roumen (September 2018). "Chapter 1: From Nationalization to Nowhere. Ownership in Bulgarian Economic Thought (1944–1989)". In Kovács, János Mátyás. Populating No Man’s Land: Economic Concepts of Ownership under Communism. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 23–46. ISBN 978-1-4985-3921-0.
  10. ^ "Report of Work in the Social Sciences". The Rockefeller Foundation Annual Report 1937 (PDF) (Report). The Rockefeller Foundation. 1938. p. 258. Retrieved 2018-11-07.
  11. ^ Anderson, Oskar N. (1935). Einführung in die Mathematische Statistik (in German). Springer-Verlag Wien. doi:10.1007/978-3-7091-5923-1. ISBN 978-3-7091-5923-1. Zbl 0012.11104.