Poet Laureate of Virginia

The position of Poet Laureate of Virginia was established December 18, 1936 by the Virginia General Assembly.[1]

Originally, the Poet Laureate of Virginia was appointed without outside consultation by the General Assembly, usually for one year, in a process that has been described being "more of a political thing".[2]

As of 1996, the procedure was changed[2] and most recently codified in 1998 in Virginia Code, Sec. 7.1–43, as follows:[1]

7.1-43. Poet laureate.
The honorary position of Poet Laureate of Virginia is hereby created. Beginning in 1998, the Governor may appoint a poet laureate from a list of nominees submitted by the Poetry Society of Virginia. Each poet laureate shall serve a term of two years with no restrictions on reappointment.
(1997, c. 299.) [1]

The Virginia General Assembly now confirms the governor's appointment.[3]

As of 2020, the current Poet Laureate of Virginia is Luisa Igloria.[4]

List of Poets Laureate of Virginia

Current Poet Laureate:

Former Poets Laureate:

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "Virginia Current Laureate". The Library of Congress. Retrieved September 17, 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d Baker, Donald P. (March 17, 1999). "For Virginia, a New Poet Laureate". Washington Post. Retrieved September 17, 2018.
  3. ^ a b "Poet Laureates of Virginia". Massanutten Regional Library. August 30, 2013. Retrieved September 17, 2018.
  4. ^ a b "Latest gubernatorial appointments for Aug. 3". Richmond Times-Dispatch. Richmond Times-Dispatch. August 3, 2020. Retrieved August 3, 2020.
  5. ^ Ducibella, Jim (June 21, 2018). "Henry Hart has a new title: poet laureate of Virginia". William & Mary News & Media. Retrieved September 17, 2018.
  6. ^ Hewitt, Jeff (October 7, 2016). "Norfolk's Tim Seibles Sworn in as Poet Laureate at Virginia's State House". AltDaily. Retrieved September 17, 2018.
  7. ^ Baldwin, Brent (November 14, 2015). "Ron Smith, Virginia's Poet Laureate. 2016 Guest Writer". Artemis. Retrieved September 17, 2018.
  8. ^ Petrini, Andi (June 9, 2018). "HRBook notes: Williamsburg poet releases 'Consequence of Moonlight'". Daily Press. Retrieved September 17, 2018.
  9. ^ "Kelly Cherry named Va. poet laureate". The Washington Post. Associated Press. January 28, 2011. Retrieved May 4, 2011.
  10. ^ Langer, Emily (December 6, 2014). "Claudia Emerson, Pulitzer-winning poet who illuminated divorce and death, dies at 57". The Washington Post. Retrieved September 17, 2018.
  11. ^ "Carolyn Kreiter-Foronda, Virginia Poet Laureate Emerita". VMFA. Retrieved September 17, 2018.
  12. ^ "Rita Dov3". Virginia Women in History. Retrieved September 17, 2018.
  13. ^ Fox, Margalit (May 20, 2008). "George Garrett, 78, Southern Novelist, Is Dead". The New York Times. Retrieved June 8, 2010.
  14. ^ Robertson, Ellen (March 8, 2016). "Service set for Grace Pow Simpson, former Virginia Poet Laureate". Richmond Times-Dispatch. Retrieved September 17, 2018.
  15. ^ "SENATE JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 42 2 Offered January 19, 1996 3 Designating Margaret Ward Morland of Lynchburg as Virginia ' s Poet Laureate for July 1, 1996, 4 through June 30, 1997". LIS: Virginia's Legislative Information System. Retrieved September 17, 2018.
  16. ^ "1995 Session HJ 466 Kathryn Forrester Thro; Poet Laureate". LIS: Virginia's Legislative Information System. Retrieved September 17, 2018.
  17. ^ "Guy Carleton Drewry dies". The Washington Post. August 6, 1991. Retrieved September 17, 2018.
  18. ^ Moxley, Tonia (May 29, 2004). "'That's the way she was, like a bubbling spring'". The Roanoke Times. Retrieved September 17, 2018.
  19. ^ a b "Poets Laureate Named In Virginia Richmond, Va". Bluefield Daily Telegraph. Bluefield, West Virginia. March 13, 1948. p. 3. Retrieved September 17, 2018. A couple of Virginia poets laureates, one for 1948 and one for 1949, were named today by the house of delegates. If the senate agrees, Thomas Lomax Hunter, β€˜β€˜Cavalier” columnist of the Richmond Times-Dispatch. will be the state’s official bard this year, and Leigh Hanes, of Roanoke, will have the versifying honors for 1949.
  20. ^ Brooker, Peter; Thacker, Andrew (January 24, 2017). The Oxford Critical and Cultural History of Modernist Magazines: Volume II: North America 1894-1960. II. Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780199545810. Retrieved September 17, 2018.
  21. ^ Pruitt, jr., Paul M. (December 2009). "Virginia's latter-day cavalier Thomas Lomax Hunter of King George County". Northern Neck of Virginia Historical Magazine. 59 (1): 7167. Retrieved September 17, 2018.[dead link]
  22. ^ Plaisance, Patrick Lee (May 17, 1998). "Ambassador of Verse". Daily Press. Retrieved September 17, 2018.
  23. ^ "Up for auction!". Belle Grove Plantation. Retrieved September 17, 2018.
  24. ^ Day, Charles (1937). Lights o'Day. A book of poems. Norfolk, Virginia: C. Day.
  25. ^ Wormeley, Carter Warner (1904). Poems. New York: Broadway Publishing Company.

External links

Other Languages

Copyright