Post-election lawsuits related to the 2020 United States presidential election

After the 2020 United States presidential election, the campaign for incumbent President Donald Trump and others filed and lost over 60 lawsuits[1][2][3][4][5] contesting election processes, vote counting, and the vote certification process in multiple states, including Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Nevada, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.[6]

Nearly all the suits were dismissed or dropped due to lack of evidence;[7] judges, lawyers, and other observers described the suits as "frivolous"[8] and "without merit".[9] In one instance, the Trump campaign and other groups seeking his reelection collectively lost multiple cases in six states on a single day.[10] Only one ruling was initially in Trump's favor: the timing within which first-time Pennsylvania voters must provide proper identification if they wanted to “cure” their ballots. This ruling affected very few votes,[1] and it was later overturned by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court.[11]

Trump, his attorneys, and his supporters falsely[12] asserted widespread election fraud in public statements, though few such assertions were made in court.[13] Every state except Wisconsin[14] met the December 8 statutory "safe harbor" deadline to resolve disputes and certify voting results. The Trump legal team had said it would not consider this election certification deadline as an expiration date for its litigation of the election results.[15][16][17] Three days after it was filed by Texas attorney general Ken Paxton, the Supreme Court on December 11 declined to hear a case supported by Trump and his Republican allies asking for electoral votes in four states to be rejected.[18]

One suit, Michigan Welfare Rights Org. et al. v. Donald J. Trump et al., was brought by black voter groups in Michigan against Trump and his 2020 presidential campaign.[19][20][21]

Background

Both before and after the election, the campaign for incumbent president Donald Trump filed a number of lawsuits contesting election processes, vote counting, and the vote certification process in multiple states, including Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Nevada, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Wisconsin.[6] Many cases were quickly dismissed, and lawyers and other observers noted that the lawsuits are not likely to have an effect on the outcome of the election.[22][23][24][25] Trump, his supporters, and his attorneys asserted widespread election fraud in public statements.[26][27][28][29]

The Trump campaign suffered several setbacks on November 13. The Department of Homeland Security released a statement saying that the election was the "most secure in American history" and that there was no evidence any voting systems malfunctioned.[30] Sixteen federal prosecutors assigned to monitor the election sent a letter to Attorney General William Barr saying there was no evidence of widespread irregularities. A law firm hired by the campaign in Pennsylvania quit amidst concerns they were being used to undermine the electoral process. The campaign dropped its "Sharpiegate" lawsuit in Arizona. A judge in Wayne County, Michigan, refused to halt the vote count or certification of the winner. In Pennsylvania, judges refused to block 8,927 mail-in votes in Montgomery and Philadelphia counties.[31]

Four lawsuits orchestrated by conservative lawyer James Bopp in Georgia, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania were dropped on November 16 after a federal appellate court said voters could not bring some constitutional claims.[32] Sidney Powell was dropped as a lawyer for the Trump campaign on November 22.[33] Powell is currently operating independently in support of the Trump campaign.[34]

By November 27, more than thirty of the legal challenges filed since Election Day had failed;[35] by December 14 over fifty lawsuits had been dismissed.

Federal judges in Georgia and Michigan rejected last-ditch efforts by pro-Trump lawyer Sidney Powell to overturn the election results on December 7.[36] United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan Judge Linda Parker wrote, "[T]his lawsuit seems to be less about achieving the relief Plaintiffs seek—as much of that relief is beyond the power of this Court—and more about the impact of their allegations on People's faith in the democratic process and their trust in our government." In the United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia, Judge Timothy C. Batten Sr. wrote, "They want this court to substitute its judgment for two-and-a-half million voters who voted for Joe Biden... And this I am unwilling to do."[37]

Judges who were nominated by Trump also dismissed the claims and reliefs made by the Trump campaign in the courtrooms.[38]

Voting machine companies Dominion Voting Systems and Smartmatic threatened legal action, claiming that they were defamed by lawyers for Trump and right-wing media companies Fox, Newsmax, and OAN, who propounded conspiracy theories about the election technology companies.[39] On December 18, lawyers for the Trump campaign told employees to preserve all documents related to Sidney Powell and the Dominion Voting Systems in relation to the suits.[40]

Legal analysis and reactions

Loyola Law School professor Justin Levitt said "[t]here's literally nothing that I've seen yet with the meaningful potential to affect the final result".[41] Ohio State University election law professor Ned Foley noted "[y]ou have to have a legal claim, and you have to have evidence to back it up. And that's just not there."[25] University of Kentucky law professor Joshua Douglas said the lawsuits "all seem to have no merit whatsoever".[42] Bradley P. Moss, an attorney specializing in national security, wrote that the suits "continue to defy reason and logic, and are purely theater ... It's all a farce".[43] University of California, Irvine election law professor Rick Hasen said there is "no evidence of fraud so far that could conceivably affect the election results".[24] Barry Richard, who helped to oversee the Republican-led Florida recount effort during the 2000 election, called the lawsuits "entirely without merit" and said they "will not be successful";[44] Gerry McDonough, an attorney who worked for the Gore campaign, said Trump "has no chance of overturning the result—it's just impossible".[45] The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency issued a statement calling the 2020 election "the most secure in American history" and noting "[t]here is no evidence that any voting system deleted or lost votes, changed votes, or was in any way compromised".[30]

Jones Day, one of many law firms working for the Trump campaign and one that specifically handled Pennsylvania Democratic Party v. Boockvar,[46] faced internal criticism for its "shortsighted" efforts on litigation that "erode[s] public confidence in the election results".[47][48]

Summary of post-election lawsuits

The Trump campaign filed the most post-election lawsuits related to the 2020 United States presidential election in the swing states of Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Nevada, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. It was a strategic decision to file lawsuits in these states that were too close to call during the night of election day and remained uncalled for a few days.

Counts

The following tally shows the number of lawsuits, sorted by state, that were dropped by plaintiff before a ruling, dismissed by the court, lost and are being appealed by plaintiff, and have a final ruling finding against plaintiff.

Total count of post-election lawsuits
State Dropped Dismissed Appeal ongoing Trial ongoing Ruled
(against)
Total
Arizona 3 3 1 0 0 7
Georgia 2 3 2 0 0 7
Michigan 2 3 1 0 1 7
Nevada 2 5 0 0 0 7
New Mexico 1 0 0 0 0 0
Pennsylvania* 1 7 1 1 3 13
Wisconsin 1 4 1 0 1 7
Others 1 2 0 2 1 6
Totals 13 27 6 3 6 55

*Count does not reflect denials

Case summaries

Unresolved post-election lawsuits related to the 2020 United States presidential election
State First filing date Case Court Docket no(s). Outcome Comments References
Arizona December 2, 2020 Bowyer et al. v. Ducey et al. Arizona United States District Court

United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit

2:20-cv-02321 Dismissal Appealed Lawsuit seeking de-certification of Arizona results, litigated by Sidney Powell. The judge ruled that the plaintiffs lacked legal standing; their fraud allegations were vague and implausible, and their evidence was unreliable or irrelevant.

Appealed to the 9th circuit

[49][50][51]

Works related to Bowyer v. Ducey at Wikisource

District of Columbia November 20, 2020 Michigan Welfare Rights Org. et al. v. Donald J. Trump et al. U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia 1:20-cv-03388 Ongoing Black voters in the Detroit area have accused the Trump campaign of attempting to disenfranchise them. [19][20][21]
Georgia November 13, 2020 Wood v. Raffensperger et al. U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Georgia 1:20-cv-04651-SD Dismissal Appealed Lawsuit challenging the inclusion of absentee ballots for the general election in Georgia.

November 19: Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) request to halt certification was Denied as plaintiff Wood lacks standing and his constitutional rights arguments fail.

December 5: United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit affirmed the denial of Wood's motion for emergency relief.

Motion filed, for an expedited consideration for a writ of certorari at the Supreme Court of the United States.

[52][53][54][55][56]
November 27, 2020 Pearson et al. v. Kemp et al. U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Georgia 1:20-cv-04809-TCB Dismissal Appealed Litigated by Sidney Powell. The judge ruled that the plaintiffs lacked legal standing and filed the case too late, that the federal court had no jurisdiction, and that the relief was impossible to grant.

Emergency petition filed in the Supreme Court of the United States for an emergency writ of mandamus.

[57][58][59][60][61][62]
Michigan November 25, 2020 King et al. v. Whitmer et al. U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan 2:20-cv-13134-LVP-RSW Dismissal Appealed December 7, 2020: Emergency Motion for Declaratory, Emergency, and Permanent Injunctive Relief denied

Appealed to the 6th Circuit.

Petition to the Supreme Court of the United States for writ of certorari filed.

[63][64][65][66][67]
Penn­sylvania November 22, 2020 Bognet et al. v. Boockvar et al. U.S. District Court for the Western District of Pennsylvania 3:20-cv-215 Dismissal Appealed Also called Bognet et al. v. Secretary Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

Asked a federal court to overturn the Pennsylvania Supreme Court's decision allowing the receipt of ballots after Election Day. Dismissed by the District Court, appealed to 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals; dismissed, and appealed to Supreme Court

[68][69]
December 20, 2020 Donald J. Trump for President v. Boockvar et al. US Supreme Court 20-845 Ongoing Supreme Court appeal of multiple Pennsylvania lawsuits. Petition for a writ of certiorari filed with response due January 22, 2021. Motion of Constitutional Attorneys for leave to file amicus brief submitted. Amicus brief of Todd C. Bank submitted.

January 11, 2021: Motion to expedite denied.

[70][71][72][73]
Wisconsin December 1, 2020 Feehan et al. v. Wisconsin Elections Comm'n et al. United States District Court for the Eastern District of Wisconsin 2:20-cv-1771 Dismissal Appealed Plaintiffs challenge a variety of election practices and claim electronic ballot stuffing campaign occurred. Plaintiffs seek decertification of election results. The case was dismissed for lack of jurisdiction on December 9, 2020. The plaintiff also lacked legal standing.

Appealed to the 7th Circuit

[74][75][76][77][78][79][80][81][82]
Resolved post-election lawsuits related to the 2020 United States presidential election outside of the swing states
State First filing date Case Court Docket no(s). Outcome Comments References
Federal December 7, 2020 Texas v. Pennsylvania et al. US Supreme Court (original jurisdiction) 22O155 Denied Lawsuit filed by Texas attorney general against Georgia, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, and Michigan.

Denied due to lack of standing.

[83][84][85]
District of Columbia November 20, 2020 Wisconsin Voters Alliance et al. v. Pence et al. U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia 1:20-cv-03791 Appeal Dropped A lawsuit challenging the election results of Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, Georgia and Arizona. Plaintiffs requested a preliminary injunction to keep defendants, including Vice President Pence and the two legislative bodies of Congress, from certifying the Presidential and Vice Presidential electors presented by the aforementioned states.

Motion for preliminary injunction denied; court to consider arguments regarding disciplinary actions against plaintiffs. Voluntarily dismissed.

.[86][87][88][89][90]
Minnesota November 24, 2020 Tyler Kistner et al. v. Steve Simon, et al. Minnesota Supreme Court A20-1486 Ruled Sought a temporary restraining order to delay the canvassing board's vote, alleging a variety of problems with the election.

On December 4, 2020, the Minnesota Supreme Court held that the doctrine of laches applied to petitioners' claims against the Secretary of State and that they had adequate time to bring suit prior to the election but failed to do so. In regards to observer access to post-election review, Minnesota law requires charges be served against county election officials which the petitioners did not do.

Dispositive Ruling in Favor of the Defense

[91][92]
Texas December 27, 2020 Gohmert et al. v. Pence United States District Court for the Eastern District of Texas 6:20-cv-00660 Dismissal Affirmed Seeks an expedited declaratory judgment finding that Section 15 of the Electoral Count Act, 3 U.S.C. §§ 5 and 15 are unconstitutional because these provisions violate the Electors Clause and the Twelfth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Plaintiffs also request emergency injunctive relief required to effectuate the requested declaratory judgment.

Dismissed due to lack of standing and jurisdiction. Plaintiffs appealed to the 5th Circuit, where the dismissal was quickly affirmed.

[93][94][95][96][97][98][99][100][101][102]

Works related to Gohmert v. Pence at Wikisource
Works related to Gohmert v. Pence (Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals) at Wikisource

United States Supreme Court

Texas v. Pennsylvania et al.

On December 8, 2020, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton sued the states of Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin in order to invalidate the results of the presidential election in those states; the lawsuit was filed with the U.S. Supreme Court[103] as it has original jurisdiction over disputes between states.[83] Texas alleged that the four states used the COVID-19 pandemic as a pretext to unconstitutionally change voting laws and increase the number of mail-in ballots.[84][104]

The attorneys general of Georgia, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin responded critically to the lawsuit,[84] while Trump and seventeen Republican state attorneys general filed motions to support the case.[105][106] After the office of Georgia's Attorney General Chris Carr described the lawsuit as "constitutionally, legally and factually wrong", Trump had a telephone conversation with Carr, in which he warned Carr not to rally other Republican state officials in opposition to the lawsuit.[107]

On December 10, over 100 House Republicans signed an amicus brief in support of Texas, including Minority Whip Steve Scalise and the ranking member on the Judiciary Committee, Jim Jordan.[104][108] That same day, the attorneys general of Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin asked the Supreme Court to reject the lawsuit.[109] In their briefs, the states challenged Texas' standing, and argued that the case did not belong in the high court; that Texas has no control over how other states conduct their elections; and that Texas waited too long to bring the suit.[109]

Legal experts criticized the lawsuit and said it was unlikely to succeed.[83][110] Rick Hasen, an election law expert at the University of California, Irvine, and Paul Smith, a professor at Georgetown University Law Center, questioned whether Texas has standing to bring the lawsuit and said the Supreme Court is unlikely to take up the case.[83] University of Texas law professor Stephen Vladeck remarked, "It looks like we have a new leader in the 'craziest lawsuit filed to purportedly challenge the election' category."[111]

On December 11, 2020 the Supreme Court denied the case:[18][112][113][114]

The State of Texas's motion for leave to file a bill of complaint is denied for lack of standing under Article III of the Constitution. Texas has not demonstrated a judicially cognizable interest in the manner in which another State conducts its elections. All other pending motions are dismissed as moot.[115]

Justice Alito, joined by Justice Thomas, contributed an additional statement, disagreeing with the denial:

In my view, we do not have discretion to deny the filing of a bill of complaint in a case that falls within our original jurisdiction. See Arizona v. California, 589 U. S. ___ (Feb. 24, 2020) (Thomas, J., dissenting). I would therefore grant the motion to file the bill of complaint but would not grant other relief, and I express no view on any other issue.[115]

Arizona

Several lawsuits were filed in the state of Arizona. Only Bowyer et al. v. Ducey et al. remains on appeal at the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

Bowyer et al. v. Ducey et al.

Bowyer et al. v. Ducey et al. is a lawsuit launched by Sidney Powell alleging considerable violations of the Arizona Election Code. The case asked to decertify the results of the election in Arizona as remedy to these violations. This case was dismissed by the Arizona district court and subsequently appealed to the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

District of Columbia

Michigan Welfare Rights Org. et al. v. Donald J. Trump et al.

Black voter groups in Michigan filed suit in the District of Columbia against the Trump campaign on November 20, 2020, alleging the campaign has disenfranchised Black voters through their attempts to challenge election results in Detroit, Philadelphia, Milwaukee, and Atlanta.[19][20]

Wisconsin Voters Alliance et al. v. Pence et al.

A lawsuit challenging the election results of Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, Georgia and Arizona was filed by the Amistad Project of the conservative Thomas More Society.[86] Among the plaintiffs were the Wisconsin Voters Alliance.[87] Shortly after the lawsuit was filed, Michigan lawmakers Matt Maddock and Daire Rendon attempted to withdraw as plaintiffs, because "what was eventually filed is very different than what was initially discussed", said Maddock.[86]

The lawsuit named Vice President Mike Pence, Congress and the Electoral College among the defendants; however the Electoral College is not actually an entity, but a process.[87]

The request for injunction was denied on January 4, 2021 on the basis of lack of jurisdiction, lack of standing, and because Plaintiffs "have established no likelihood of success on the merits"[88] since the request was based on a fundamental misreading of the law.[89] Judge James E. Boasberg also stated that "at the conclusion of this litigation, the Court will determine whether to issue an order to show cause why this matter should not be referred to its Committee on Grievances for potential discipline of Plaintiffs’ counsel" due to their failure to duly notify or serve Defendants, despite reminders from the Court.[88][116] The lawsuit was withdrawn on January 7, 2020.[90]

Georgia

Several lawsuits were filed in Georgia after the election. Two remain on appeal to the United States Supreme Court, Wood v. Raffensperger et al. and Pearson et al. v. Kemp et al.

Michigan

Several lawsuits were filed in Michigan after the election. Only one remains on appeal to the United States Supreme Court, King et al. v. Whitmer et al.

King et al. v. Whitmer et al.

King et al. v. Whitmer et al. is a lawsuit launched by Sidney Powell alleging considerable violations of the Michigan Election Code. The case asked to decertify the results of the election in Michigan as remedy to these violations. This case was dismissed by the Michigan district court and subsequently appealed to the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit and the United States Supreme Court.

Minnesota

Kistner v. Simon

On November 24, 2020, a petition was filed in the Minnesota Supreme Court by 25 candidates from numerous races within Minnesota as well as a handful of voters against Minnesota Secretary of State Steve Simon and the state's canvassing board. The suit alleged various election problems and sought a temporary restraining order delaying certification of election results,[91] which had already been certified the previous day.[117]

On December 4, 2020, the Minnesota Supreme Court dismissed all 3 claims filed by the petitioners, and thereby ordered that the whole petitioned filed on November 24, 2020 be dismissed.[92]

The court's decision to dismiss was based partly on the grounds that petitioners should have filed suit earlier. "Given the undisputed public record regarding the suspension of the witness requirement for absentee and mail ballots, petitioners had a duty to act well before November 3, 2020," the ruling states. It goes on to say that "asserting these claims 2 months after voting started, 3 weeks after voting ended, and less than 24 hours before the State Canvassing Board met to certify the election results is unreasonable."[118]

Nevada

Seven lawsuits were filed in Nevada after November 3, 2020. All of these lawsuits have been either dropped or dismissed.

New Mexico

Donald J. Trump for President v. Oliver et al.

On December 14, 2020, the same day that New Mexico electors cast their electoral college votes, the Trump campaign filed a lawsuit in federal court against New Mexico Secretary of State, Maggie Toulouse Oliver, the electors of New Mexico and the State Canvassing Board. The lawsuit concerns the use of drop boxes in the 2020 elections. The federal lawsuit claims that New Mexico Secretary of State Maggie Toulouse Oliver violated the state election code by permitting voters to deposit completed absentee ballots in drop boxes at voting locations rather than handing them to the location's presiding judge in person. The complaint asks the court to order a delay in certifying New Mexico's electoral vote, which had already occurred, and mandate a statewide canvass of New Mexico's absentee ballots, including investigations into every voting location where a drop box was implemented.[119][120]

On January 11, 2021, five days after Congress certified the results for Joe Biden, the campaign dropped the lawsuit. [121] Trump attorney Mark Caruso cited “events that have transpired since the inception of this lawsuit” in a three-page motion as the reason for dropping the lawsuit. Although, the motion still allows for revisiting these concerns in the future. [122]

Pennsylvania

Several lawsuits were filed in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.[41] Only four are still pending in federal jurisdiction at the United States Supreme Court. Of these, two lawsuits were filed after Election Day, and the other two were filed before the election. The lawsuits filed after Election day are Bognet et al. v. Boockvar et al. and Donald J. Trump for President v. Boockvar et al..

Bognet et al. v. Boockvar et al.

Asked a federal court to overturn the Pennsylvania Supreme Court's decision allowing the receipt of ballots after Election Day. Dismissed by the Pennsylvania district court, appealed to 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals; dismissed, and appealed to Supreme Court.[123]

Donald J. Trump for President v. Boockvar et al.

Donald J. Trump for President v. Boockvar et al. is a lawsuit filed in the United States Supreme Court on December 20, 2020.[70] The suit asks the Court to evaluate the constitutionality of three Pennsylvania Supreme Court decisions: In re November 3, 2020 Gen. Election, In re Canvassing Observation, and In re Canvass of Absentee & Mail-In Ballots of November 3, 2020 Gen. Election.[71] The Trump campaign also submitted a request to expedite proceedings,[71] but the Court ignored this and instead set the deadline for reply briefs from the respondents for January 22, 2021, two days after President Elect Biden's inauguration.[124]

Texas

Gohmert et al. v. Pence

On December 27, 2020, Texas Congressman Louie Gohmert, Arizona Republican Party Chair Kelli Ward, and other Republican party members filed a complaint in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Texas. Vice President Mike Pence was named as defendant of the suit. The complaint argued that certain provisions of the Electoral Count Act of 1887 are unconstitutional under the Electors Clause and the Twelfth Amendment of the United States Constitution. The lawsuit's intended outcome was for Pence to be empowered to select self-styled "alternate" slates of electors from specific swing states on January 6, 2021, such that Trump received those states' electoral votes and wins the election; the Electoral Count Act does not give the Vice President any such "sole discretionary" power over electoral votes, and none of the self-styled "alternate" slates of electors from the swing states have been certified by their respective states' legal processes.[93][94][95]

Judge Jeremy Kernodle, U.S. District Court of the Eastern District of Texas, called for Vice President Pence to issue a response to the lawsuit by December 31, 2020, at 5 p.m. and for Gohmert to issue a reply to Pence by January 1, 2021, at 9 a.m.[96] Pence replied on December 31 that the suit should be dismissed because he is not the appropriate party to address the matter.[97] The Justice Department also requested the suit be dismissed.[125] On January 1, 2021, Gohmert and other Republicans filed a new brief contending that Pence is the proper defendant in the case, and that the United States or House or Senate parliamentarians could be added as defendants by the congressman for clarification. Gohmert stated that he needs a ruling by January 4, 2021.[126] Nonetheless, the Justice Department supported Pence and noted that Congress, not Pence, is more suitable to be sued. In addition, congressional lawyers supported Pence's position as well.[127]

The case was dismissed without prejudice on January 1, 2021, for lack of both standing and jurisdiction.[98][102][99][100] Judge Kernodle ruled that Gohmert lacked standing due to precedent set by the Supreme Court in 1997: alleging an "institutional injury to the House of Representatives" does not grant Gohmert standing to sue "as an individual". Additionally, Kernodle ruled that the injury Gohmert was alleging "requires a series of hypothetical—but by no means certain—events" that were "far too uncertain to support standing".[102][128] As for the other plaintiffs, Kernodle ruled that they lacked standing because the injury they alleged was "not fairly traceable" to the Vice President.[129] Gohmert appealed the district court's ruling that day.[102][101]

On January 2, a three-judge panel speedily and tersely rejected the appeal, "affirm[ing] the judgment" of the district court "essentially for the reasons stated" in Kernodle's order.[102][130] The unanimous ruling was made by three Republican appointees: Andy Oldham (Trump) and Patrick Higginbotham and Jerry Edwin Smith (Reagan).[102]

Gohmert then appealed to the Supreme Court, which on January 7 also tersely rejected his petition as "denied".[131]

Wisconsin

Several lawsuits were filed in Wisconsin after the election. A three-judge panel of the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals unanimously rejected Trump's appeal of a lower court's ruling in Trump v. Wisconsin Elections Commission on December 24.[132] The Court was still considering another case, Feehan et al. v. Wisconsin Elections Commission et al..

Mark Jefferson v. Dane County, Wisconsin

On December 14, 2020, a petition was filed in the Wisconsin Supreme Court by Mark Jefferson and the Republican Party of Wisconsin seeking a declaration that (1) Dane County lacks the authority to issue an interpretation of Wisconsin's election law allowing all electors in Dane County to obtain an absentee ballot without a photo identification and (2) Governor Tony Evers' Emergency Order #12 did not authorize all Wisconsin voters to obtain an absentee ballot without a photo identification. The Wisconsin Supreme Court ruled in favor of Mark Jefferson and the Republican Party of Wisconsin, stating that the Dane County government's interpretation of Wisconsin election laws was erroneous. "A county clerk may not 'declare' that any elector is indefinitely confined due to a pandemic," the court said. The court further stated that "...the presence of a communicable disease such as COVID-19, in and of itself, does not entitle all electors in Wisconsin to obtain an absentee ballot..."[133][134][135]

See also

References

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