Sophia of England

Sophia of England
Sophia1605.jpg
Detail from a 1625 engraving of King James and his family showing a baby in a cradle
Born 22 June 1606
Greenwich Palace, Greenwich
Died (1606-06-23)23 June 1606
Greenwich Palace, Greenwich
Burial
Full name
Sophia Stuart
House Stuart
Father James VI
Mother Anne of Denmark

Sophia Stuart (22 June – 23 June 1606) was the fourth daughter and seventh and final child of King James VI and I by his wife Anne of Denmark. She was born at Greenwich Palace on 22 June 1606 and died there the next day.[1] Alice Dennis was the midwife, she had also attended the birth of Princess Mary in April 1605.[2]

Sophia was buried in King Henry's Chapel, Westminster Abbey, in a monument designed by Maximilian Colt and painted by John de Critz that resembles a stone cradle.[3][4] The Earl of Salisbury made the contract with the sculptor.[5]

Anne of Denmark kept to her chamber at Greenwich for a month until her brother Christian IV of Denmark arrived on 17 July 1606. She remained at Greenwich and did not go the Entertainment at Theobalds House on 24 July 1606. On 3 August she was "churched" at Greenwich with both kings present and the next day attended a tournament of running at the ring. The following day, 5 August, was held as a day of thanksgiving for the king's deliverance from the Gowrie Conspiracy at Perth in 1600.[6] Anne and Prince Henry came on barges to Northfleet to Rochester, where Anne of Denmark and both kings had dinner on the English ship, the Elizabeth Jonas, then were rowed to Chatham.[7]

References

  1. ^ John Nichols, The Progresses, Processions, and Magnificent Festivities of King James the First, vol. 2 (London, 1828), p. 52.
  2. ^ Frederick Devon, Issues of the Exchequer (London, 1836), pp. 34-5, 47.
  3. ^ Frederick Devon, Issues of the Exchequer in the Reign of James I (London, 1836), p. 60.
  4. ^ Westminster Abbey website, accessed January 2018
  5. ^ John Nichols, The Progresses, Processions, and Magnificent Festivities of King James the First, vol. 2 (London, 1828), pp. 52-53 footnote.
  6. ^ John Nichols, The Progresses, Processions, and Magnificent Festivities of King James the First, vol. 2 (London, 1828), pp. 53, 59, 64, 70-74, 79-80, 88.
  7. ^ John Nichols, The Progresses, Processions, and Magnificent Festivities of King James the First, vol. 2 (London, 1828), pp. 82-3, 91.

Ancestors

Copyright