Souvenir Henri Desgrange

Souvenir Henri Desgrange
A cylindrical stone monument with the an inscription inside by an outline of France
The monument to Henri Desgrange near the summit of the Col du Galibier
Sport Road bicycle racing
Competition Tour de France
Given for First across a particular point
Location Various
Country France
History
First award 1947
Editions 72 (as of 2019)
First winner  Raymond Impanis (BEL)
Most wins  Richard Virenque (FRA)
3 wins
Most recent  Egan Bernal (COL)

The Souvenir Henri Desgrange is an award and cash prize given in the yearly running of the Tour de France, one of cycling's Grand Tour races. It is won by the rider that crosses a particular point in the race, mostly the summits of the highest and iconic climbs in the Alps and Pyrenees. It is named in honour of the creator and first race director of the Tour, French sports journalist Henri Desgrange,[1] who was passionate about taking the Tour de France as high up in the mountains as possible using the most difficult routes.[2]

History

Following the death of Desgrange in August 1940,[3] an award was given in his honour for the first time in the 1947 Tour, the first Tour since 1939, having been cancelled during World War II.[4] On stage 11, Raymond Impanis was the first of the field to pass a point by Desgrange's final residence, the "Villa Mia" in Beauvallon, Grimaud, on the French Riviera.[5][6] In the first stage of the 1948 Tour, the prize was earned by Roger Lambrecht in opening few kilometres at the summit of the CĂŽte de Picardie climb in Versailles, Paris.[7][8][9] Beauvallon again hosted the award the following year,[10] before the 1950 and 1951 Tours saw the award marker point moved into the mountains atop the 2,058 m (6,752 ft)-high Col du Lautaret,[11][12][13] the pass that directly precedes the Galibier climb from the south.[14] In 1949, a monument to Desgrange was built 150 m (492 ft) from the southern entrance of the summit tunnel atop the Col du Galibier in the Alps, his favourite and one of the Tour's most iconic climbs.[15][16] A wreath is laid at the monument when the Tour passes.[17] Beginning in 1952,[18] the marking point for the prize took place by the monument for the subsequent times the Tour visited the Galibier.[18] Since the 1965 Tour, the Galibier has always been used when it was passed.[18]

The tunnel at the summit of the Galibier was closed for safety reasons in 1976 â€“ evenually re-opening in 2002.[19][20] Bypassing the tunnel, the road was then extended a further kilometre up to the natural crest of the pass,[21] increasing the elevation of the summit by 86 meters to 2,642 m (8,668 ft).[22] This has been award's marking point on the Galibier ever since it was first traversed in the 1979 Tour, when Lucien Van Impe claimed the award.[16] The tunnel was passed through on stage 19 of the 2011 Tour, but in that edition the Galibier was climb twice in celebration the 100th anniversary of its appearance in the Tour.[23] The finish of the previous stage was atop the full Galibier climb, where Andy Schleck claimed memorable stage win as well as the award after his 60 km (37 mi) solo breakaway.[24] This was first ever Galibier summit stage finish and the highest ever Tour stage finish in history to that point.[23] Further notable stages featuring the award on the Galibier were in the 1952 and 1998 Tours, when Italians Fausto Coppi and Marco Pantani, respectively, took the award and then went on to win the stage, which proved decisive to both their overall general classification victories.[17][25]

Non-summit marking points have been sparsely used for the award.[18] Beauvallon was a host for a total of six times, with final appearance in the 1964 Tour.[18] The village of Cysoing in the far north hosted on the 1956 Tour, marking 200,000 kilometres travelled in Tour de France history.[26] Only twice have non-summit marking points happened since 1964.[18] Stage 11 of the 1978 race saw the award given to Christian Seznec at the legendary village of Sainte-Marie de Campan in the valley between the Col du Tourmalet and Col d'Aspin in the Pyrenees,[27] made famous when in the 1913 Tour, per the rules, EugĂšne Christophe was forced walk 14 km (9 mi) down the Tourmalet carrying his bicycle broken before repairing it at a forge in Campan.[28] The last time a non-summit point took place during the Grand DĂ©part (opening stages) of the 1981 Tour, hosted by Nice, with the award at first planned to take place in the final kilometres of stage 1a beside the Carrefour supermarket on the Promenade des Anglais. This break from tradition was seen by the media as disrespectful to the race and the legacy of Desgrange.[29][30] For unknown reasons the marking point banner was stolen the night before.[30] The replacement banner was strung up in the Landes forest 42 km (26 mi) before the end of stage 7 in Bordeaux,[31][32] which was won unexpectedly by Theo de Rooij as a result of him being at the front of the leading breakaway group.[33]

From the 1965 Tour onwards, if the Galibier was not passed then the award was instead given atop a climb of similarly equal height, most commonly the Tourmalet, and beginning with the 1997 Tour, the highest climb of a Tour was mostly used when the Galibier was not included.[18][34] Since the 2013 Tour, the highest climb has always been used (as of 2019). On two occasions the Galibier climb been cancelled because of bad weather and the award locations were moved;[35] snow in 1996 saw it replaced by the 1,709 m (5,607 ft)-high Pyreenan Col d'Aubisque,[36][37][38] and landslides in 2015 moved the award to 2,250 m (7,382 ft)-high Alpine Col d'Allos.[39]

The amount of cash given as a prize for the award was higher in the early Tours.[18] Cash prizes have also been given to the second and third placed riders. Since 2003, the winner has received a €5000 prize.[18] Only in the 1963 Tour has the award not been given, although at the conclusion of that race there was a special "Desgrange prize" given to the general classification winner Jacques Anquetil who was adjudged to have had the best "head and legs" throughout the Tour.[18][40] The Souvenir Jacques Goddet, honouring the second Tour director Jacques Goddet, is a similar award in the race given since the 2001 Tour mostly atop the Tourmalet.[41][42]

Locations and winners

Key
* Col du Galibier was passed but not used for the award
^ Highest point of elevation reached on that year's Tour
double-dagger Winner of the award also won the overall general classification
dagger Winner of the award also won the stage finish
Winner (#) Multiple award winner and number of times they had won the award at that point
List of Souvenir Henri Desgrange locations and winners [a] [34]
Year Stage Location Elevation Winner Nationality Team Cash prize Ref
1947 11 Beauvallon, Grimaud * 1.5 m (5 ft) Raymond Impanis  Belgium Belgium F 35,000 [5][43][44]
1948 1 CĂŽte de Picardie * 178 m (584 ft) Roger Lambrecht  Belgium Internationals F 30,000 [7][8][9]
1949 15 Beauvallon, Grimaud 1.5 m (5 ft) Paul Giguet  France South-East F 60,000 [43][10]
1950 19 Col du Lautaret 2,058 m (6,752 ft) Apo LazaridĂšs  France France F 75,000 [12]
1951 21 Col du Lautaret 2,058 m (6,752 ft) Gino Sciardis  France Île-de-France/North-West F 30,000 [13]
1952 11 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) ^ Fausto Coppi double-daggerdagger  Italy Italy F 40,000 [45][46]
1953 16 Beauvallon, Grimaud 1.5 m (5 ft) Claude Colette  France South-West F 100,000 [43][47]
1954 19 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) ^ Federico Bahamontes  Spain Spain F 100,000 [48]
1955 10 Beauvallon, Grimaud * 1.5 m (5 ft) AndrĂ© Darrigade  France France F 100,000 [43][49][50]
1956 2 Cysoing[b] unknown Pierre PardoĂ«n  France North-East/Centre F 100,000 [26][51]
1957 12 Beauvallon, Grimaud * 1.5 m (5 ft) Jean Stablinski dagger  France France F 100,000 [43][52][53]
1958 21 Col du Lautaret 2,058 m (6,752 ft) Piet van Est  Netherlands Netherlands/Luxembourg F 100,000 [54]
1959 18 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) Charly Gaul  Luxembourg Netherlands/Luxembourg F 100,000 [55]
1960 17 Col du Lautaret 2,058 m (6,752 ft) Jean Graczyk dagger  France France F 200,000 [56][57]
1961 6 Ballon d'Alsace 1,178 m (3,865 ft) Jef Planckaert dagger  Belgium Belgium F 2,000 [58][59]
1962 19 Col du Lautaret 2,058 m (6,752 ft) Juan Campillo  Spain Margnat–Paloma–D'Alessandro F 2,000 [60]
1963 Not awarded[c]
1964 10a Beauvallon, Grimaud * 1.5 m (5 ft) AndrĂ© Darrigade (2)  France Margnat–Paloma–Dunlop F 2,000 [43][61]
1965 17 Col du Lautaret 2,058 m (6,752 ft) Francisco Gabica  Spain Kas–Kaskol F 2,000 [62][63]
1966 16 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) ^ Julio JimĂ©nez dagger  Spain Ford France–Hutchinson F 2,000 [64]
1967 10 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) ^ Julio JimĂ©nez (2)  Spain Spain F 2,000 [65][66]
1968 19 Col des Aravis 1,498 m (4,915 ft) Barry Hoban dagger  Great Britain Great Britain F 2,000 [67]
1969 10 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) ^ Eddy Merckx double-dagger  Belgium Faema F 2,000 [68]
1970 19 Col du Soulor 1,474 m (4,836 ft) Raymond Delisle  France Peugeot–BP–Michelin F 2,000 [69]
1971 19 CĂŽte de Dourdan 160 m (525 ft) Wilmo Francioni  Italy Ferretti F 2,000 [70][71]
1972 14a Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) ^ Joop Zoetemelk  Netherlands Beaulieu–Flandria F 2,000 [72]
1973 8 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) ^ Luis Ocaña double-daggerdagger  Spain Bic F 2,000 [73]
1974 11 Col du Galibier 2,556 m (8,386 ft) ^ Vicente LĂłpez Carril dagger  Spain Kas–Kaskol F 2,500 [74]
1975 17 Col du TĂ©lĂ©graphe 1,566 m (5,138 ft) Luis Balague  Spain Super Ser F 2,500 [75][76]
1976 10 Col du Lautaret 2,058 m (6,752 ft) Luciano Conati  Italy Scic–Fiat F 2,000 [77][78]
1977 2 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) ^ Lucien Van Impe  Belgium Lejeune–BP ƒ 1,400 [79]
1978 11 Sainte-Marie de Campan 857 m (2,812 ft) Christian Seznec  France Miko–Mercier–Vivagel ƒ 2,000 [27][80]
1979 17 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) ^ Lucien Van Impe (2)  Belgium Kas–Campagnolo unknown [81]
1980 17 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) ^ Johan De Muynck  Belgium Splendor–Admiral F 10,000 [82]
1981 7 Landes forest[d] unknown Theo de Rooij  Netherlands Capri Sonne–Koga Miyata F 5,000 [32][33][83]
1982 12 Col d'Aubisque 1,709 m (5,607 ft) Beat Breu   Switzerland Cilo–Aufina F 5,000 [84][85]
1983 10 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) ^ JosĂ© Patrocinio JimĂ©nez  Colombia Varta–Colombia F 8,500 [86][87]
1984 18 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) ^ Francisco RodrĂ­guez Maldonado  Colombia Splendor–Mondial Moquettes–Marc ƒ 2,500 [88]
1985 17 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) ^ Pello Ruiz Cabestany  Spain Seat–Orbea F 10,000 [89]
1986 18 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) ^ Luis Herrera  Colombia CafĂ© de Colombia–Varta F 12,000 [90]
1987 21 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) ^ Federico Muñoz  Spain Fagor–MBK ƒ 7,000 [91][92]
1988 15 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) ^ Laudelino Cubino dagger  Spain BH unknown [93][94]
1989 17 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) ^ Gert-Jan Theunisse dagger  Netherlands PDM–Concorde unknown [95]
1990 16 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) ^ Miguel Ángel MartĂ­nez Torres  Spain ONCE unknown [96][97]
1991 13 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) ^ Claudio Chiappucci dagger  Italy Carrera Jeans–Tassoni F 30,000 [98][99]
1992 14 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) Franco Chioccioli  Italy GB–MG Maglificio ƒ 7,000 [100][101]
1993 10 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) Tony Rominger dagger   Switzerland CLAS–Cajastur unknown [102][103]
1994 12 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) Richard Virenque dagger  France Festina–Lotus F 30,000 [104][105]
1995 15 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) ^ Richard Virenque dagger(2)  France Festina–Lotus unknown [106][107]
1996 17 Col d'Aubisque[e] 1,709 m (5,607 ft) Neil Stephens  Australia ONCE F 20,000 [37]
1997 10 Port d'Envalira 2,407 m (7,897 ft) ^ Richard Virenque (3)  France Festina–Lotus unknown [108][109]
1998 15 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) ^ Marco Pantani double-daggerdagger  Italy Mercatone Uno–Bianchi unknown [110]
1999 9 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) ^ JosĂ© Luis Arrieta  Spain Banesto F 20,000 [111][112]
2000 15 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) ^ Pascal HervĂ©  France Banesto F 20,000 [113][114]
2001 10 Col de la Madeleine 2,000 m (6,562 ft) Laurent Roux  France Jean Delatour F 20,000 [115][116]
2002 16 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) ^ Santiago Botero  Colombia Kelme–Costa Blanca €3,000 [117]
2003 8 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) ^ Stefano Garzelli  Italy Vini Caldirola–So.di €5,000 [118][119]
2004 17 Col de la Madeleine 2,000 m (6,562 ft) ^ Gilberto Simoni  Italy Saeco Macchine per CaffĂš €5,000 [120][121]
2005 11 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) ^ Alexander Vinokourov dagger  Kazakhstan T-Mobile Team €5,000 [122][123]
2006 16 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) ^ Michael Rasmussen dagger  Denmark Rabobank €5,000 [124][125]
2007 9 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) Mauricio Soler dagger  Colombia Barloworld €5,000 [126][127]
2008 17 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) Stefan Schumacher  Germany Gerolsteiner €5,000 [128][129]
2009 16 Col du Grand-Saint-Bernard 2,470 m (8,104 ft) ^ Franco Pellizotti[f]  Italy Liquigas €5,000 [131][132]
2010 17 Col du Tourmalet 2,115 m (6,939 ft) ^ Andy Schleck double-dagger[g]dagger  Luxembourg Team Saxo Bank €5,000 [134][135]
2011 18 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) Andy Schleck dagger(2)  Luxembourg Leopard Trek €5,000 [24][136]
2012 11 Col de la Croix de Fer 2,067 m (6,781 ft) Fredrik Kessiakoff  Sweden Astana €5,000 [137][138]
2013 8 Port de PailhĂšres 2,001 m (6,565 ft) ^ Nairo Quintana  Colombia Movistar Team €5,000 [139][140]
2014 14 Col d'Izoard 2,360 m (7,743 ft) ^ Joaquim RodrĂ­guez  Spain Team Katusha €5,000 [141][142]
2015 20 Col d'Allos[h] 2,250 m (7,382 ft) ^ Simon Geschke  Germany Team Giant–Alpecin €5,000 [143][145]
2016 10 Port d'Envalira 2,407 m (7,897 ft) ^ Rui Costa  Portugal Lampre–Merida €5,000 [146][147]
2017 17 Col du Galibier 2,642 m (8,668 ft) ^ PrimoĆŸ Roglič dagger  Slovenia LottoNL–Jumbo €5,000 [148][149]
2018 17 Col de Portet 2,215 m (7,267 ft) ^ Nairo Quintana dagger(2)  Colombia Movistar Team €5,000 [150][151]
2019 19 Col de l'Iseran * 2,770 m (9,088 ft) ^ Egan Bernal double-dagger[i]  Colombia Team Ineos €5,000 [152][153]

Multiple winners

The following riders have won the Souvenir Henri Desgrange on 2 or more occasions.

Multiple winners of the Souvenir Henri Desgrange
Cyclist Total Years
 Richard Virenque (FRA) 3 1994, 1995, 1997
 AndrĂ© Darrigade (FRA) 2 1955, 1964
 Julio JimĂ©nez (ESP) 2 1966, 1967
 Lucien Van Impe (BEL) 2 1977, 1979
 Andy Schleck (LUX) 2 2010, 2011
 Nairo Quintana (COL) 2 2013, 2018

Winners by nationality

Riders from sixteen different countries have won the Souvenir Henri Desgrange.

Souvenir Henri Desgrange winners by nationality
Country No. of winning cyclists No. of wins
 France 17 15
 Spain 14 13
 Italy[f] 8 8
 Colombia 8 7
 Belgium 7 6
 Netherlands 4 4
 Luxembourg 3 2
 Germany 2 2
 Australia 1 1
 Denmark 1 1
 Great Britain 1 1
 Kazakhstan 1 1
 Portugal 1 1
 Slovenia 1 1
 Sweden 1 1
  Switzerland 1 1

See also

Copyright