Takanoshō Nobuaki

Takanoshō Nobuaki
隆の勝 伸明
Personal information
Born Nobuaki Ishii
(1994-11-14) November 14, 1994 (age 26)
Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan
Height 1.84 m (6 ft 12 in)
Weight 164 kg (362 lb; 25 st 12 lb)
Career
Stable Tokiwayama
Current rank see below
Debut March, 2010
Highest rank Sekiwake (November, 2020)
Special Prizes Fighting Spirit (1)
* Up to date as of 28 March 2021.

Takanoshō Nobuaki (Japanese: 隆の勝 伸明, born 14 November 1994 as Nobuaki Ishii (石井 伸明, Ishii Nobuaki)) is a Japanese professional sumo wrestler from Kashiwa, Chiba. He made his professional debut in March 2010, reaching the top makuuchi division in September 2018. His highest rank has been sekiwake. He wrestles for Tokiwayama stable.

Career

He was the fourth of six children, and it was noted early on that he had the physique for sumo, being much bigger than all his siblings . He took part in a local sumo tournament in his first year of elementary school, and in junior high he represented Chiba Prefecture in the team competition at the National Junior High School Sumo Championships. Future makuuchi wrestler Daishōhō was on the same team. Upon graduating from junior high he entered Chiganoura stable (since renamed), run by ex-sekiwake Masudayama. He took the shikona of Masunoshō (舛ノ勝) and made his debut in March 2010. He was a member of the same entry class as Kagayaki and Chiyono-ō [ja]. He reached the sandanme division in July 2011, and the makushita division in May 2012. In 2014 he twice fell back to sandanme but returned immediately both times, and had established himself as a makushita regular by January 2015. In April 2016 his stablemaster retired and the stable moved to the Takanohana ichimon, with former komusubi Takamisugi taking over as head coach. In January 2017, he changed the spelling of his shikona name to 舛の勝. Benefiting from increased training opportunities at the Takanohana and Ōnomatsu stables, he earned promotion to the sekitori ranks with a 6–1 record at makushita 3 in September 2017. To mark the occasion he changed his shikona to Takanoshō, reflecting his change of stablemaster.[1] He was the first wrestler from Kashiwa to win promotion to the jūryō division since Kirinji 44 years earlier.

Takanoshō came through with a winning record in his jūryō debut in November 2017, and in July 2018 scored 13 wins against two losses from jūryō 4, although he lost a playoff for the championship to Takanoiwa. He was the first wrestler to win 13 bouts in jūryō and not take the championship since Ichinojō in July 2014. Nevertheless, he was promoted to the top makuuchi division for the following September 2018 tournament. He told a press conference that previously makuuchi was just a world seen on TV, and he was glad to see his name in the top part of the banzuke.[2] His stablemaster said he hoped that Takanoshō would eventually reach san'yaku.[2] In his makuuchi debut he was aiming for double-digit wins and the Fighting Spirit special prize, but this became impossible after his sixth loss on Day 13, and he ended the tournament with an 8–7 record. (This became the first tournament since special prizes were introduced in 1947 that none were awarded at all.) He produced a disappointing 4–11 record in November 2018 and was demoted back to jūryō. In January 2019 he suffered a right anterior cruciate ligament injury and he pulled out on Day 3, only to attempt a comeback on Day 9. However, he ended up withdrawing again on Day 11. He fell to jūryō 13 in March but returned from injury with an 11–4 record. He won promotion back to the top division after the September 2019 tournament, and produced his best makuuchi score to date of 10–5 in November. This saw him promoted to a career-high rank of maegashira 9 for the January 2020 tournament. In March he produced his best score in the top division to date, finishing joint runner-up with Kakuryū on 12–3. He was awarded his first special prize, for Fighting Spirit.[3] In the November 2020 tournament he made his san'yaku debut at sekiwake, and came through with a winning record of 8–7.[4] In December he revealed that he was again having problems with the anterior cruciate ligament injury in his right knee, for which surgery was recommended, but he planned to resume training instead.[5]

Fighting style

Takanoshō is an oshi-sumo wrestler, who prefers to push and thrust at his opponents rather than grapple with the mawashi or belt. His most common winning kimarite or technique is oshi-dashi, a straightforward push out.[6]

Personal life

He is a fan of the band One Ok Rock and got to meet them after they performed in Fukuoka Prefecture on 27 November 2019, where Takanoshō was on a regional sumo tour.

Career record

Takanoshō Nobuaki [7]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
2010 x (Maezumo) East Jonokuchi #17
4–3
 
West Jonidan #103
5–2
 
West Jonidan #55
5–2
 
West Jonidan #13
2–5
 
2011 West Jonidan #52
4–3
 

Tournament Cancelled
0–0–0
West Jonidan #26
5–2
 
West Sandanme #75
5–2
 
West Sandanme #45
3–4
 
East Sandanme #62
5–2
 
2012 East Sandanme #36
5–2
 
West Sandanme #10
4–3
 
East Makushita #60
4–3
 
West Makushita #51
4–3
 
West Makushita #44
4–3
 
East Makushita #36
3–4
 
2013 West Makushita #44
6–1
 
East Makushita #18
3–4
 
East Makushita #28
4–3
 
East Makushita #23
2–5
 
East Makushita #40
3–4
 
West Makushita #46
2–5
 
2014 East Sandanme #1
4–3
 
East Makushita #53
4–3
 
East Makushita #46
4–3
 
West Makushita #38
3–4
 
East Makushita #48
2–5
 
East Sandanme #11
5–2
 
2015 East Makushita #48
6–1
 
East Makushita #20
5–2
 
East Makushita #12
2–5
 
West Makushita #29
5–2
 
West Makushita #14
2–5
 
East Makushita #32
4–3
 
2016 East Makushita #26
4–3
 
East Makushita #22
5–2
 
East Makushita #11
3–4
 
East Makushita #17
4–3
 
West Makushita #13
5–2
 
East Makushita #6
2–5
 
2017 East Makushita #15
5–2
 
East Makushita #8
4–3
 
West Makushita #6
4–3
 
East Makushita #5
4–3
 
East Makushita #3
6–1
 
West Jūryō #13
9–6
 
2018 East Jūryō #9
9–6
 
West Jūryō #6
8–7
 
West Jūryō #3
7–8
 
East Jūryō #4
13–2–P
 
East Maegashira #14
8–7
 
West Maegashira #13
4–11
 
2019 West Jūryō #2
2–4–9
 
East Jūryō #13
11–4
 
East Jūryō #4
7–8
 
West Jūryō #4
9–6
 
East Jūryō #2
10–5
 
West Maegashira #12
10–5
 
2020 East Maegashira #9
7–8
 
East Maegashira #9
12–3
F
East Maegashira #2
Tournament Cancelled
0–0–0
East Maegashira #2
8–7
 
West Maegashira #1
10–5
 
West Sekiwake #1
8–7
 
2021 West Sekiwake #1
9–6
 
West Sekiwake #1
8–7
 
x x x x
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See also

References

  1. ^ "鶴竜、栃ノ心も気になる存在とは?十両・隆の勝から目が離せない". Sponichi (in Japanese). 10 May 2018. Retrieved 31 January 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ a b "隆の勝が新入幕「本当にうれしい」初土俵から8年半". Nikkan Sports (in Japanese). 27 August 2018. Retrieved 31 January 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ "Sumo: Hakuho outlasts Kakuryu to claim record 44th Emperor's Cup". The Mainichi. 22 March 2020. Retrieved 30 March 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ "Takakeisho poised for first shot at yokozuna promotion". Japan Times. 24 December 2020. Retrieved 8 January 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ "Takakeishō emphasizes lower body training, Takanosho reveals right knee injury". Sanspo (in Japanese). 12 December 2020. Retrieved 8 January 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ "Takanosho bouts by kimarite". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 31 January 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ "Takanosho Nobuaki Rikshi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 31 January 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

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