Tom Kurvers

Tom Kurvers
Born (1962-09-14)September 14, 1962
Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.
Died June 21, 2021(2021-06-21) (aged 58)
Saint Paul, Minnesota, U.S.
Height 6 ft 0 in (183 cm)
Weight 190 lb (86 kg; 13 st 8 lb)
Position Defense
Shot Left
Played for Montreal Canadiens
Buffalo Sabres
New Jersey Devils
Toronto Maple Leafs
Vancouver Canucks
New York Islanders
Mighty Ducks of Anaheim
NHL Draft 145th overall, 1981
Montreal Canadiens
Playing career 1984–1996

Thomas James Kurvers (September 14, 1962 – June 21, 2021) was an American professional ice hockey defenseman in the National Hockey League (NHL). He spent eleven seasons in the NHL between 1984 and 1995. He won the 1984 Hobey Baker award as the best collegiate ice hockey player, and won the Stanley Cup with the Montreal Canadiens in 1986. After his playing career, he was an executive for the Phoenix Coyotes, the Tampa Bay Lightning and then the Minnesota Wild.

Playing career

Kurvers played collegiately at the University of Minnesota Duluth, and was selected 145th overall by the Montreal Canadiens in the 1981 NHL Entry Draft following his freshman season.[1] His time at Duluth culminated in winning the Hobey Baker Award, given to the most outstanding collegiate hockey player in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), as a senior in the 1983–84 season after registering 76 points in just 43 games.[2]

Kurvers made his National Hockey League (NHL) debut in the 1984–85 season with the Montreal Canadiens,[3] with whom he won the Stanley Cup in 1986.[1] After two full seasons with the Canadiens, and one game in the 1986–87 season, he was traded to the Buffalo Sabres for a draft pick.[1]

Before the 1987–88 season, the Sabres traded Kurvers to the New Jersey Devils.[4] He played his most productive post-season hockey that year for the Devils, posting 15 points in 19 games during their run to the 1988 Wales Conference Finals.[4][5][6] He followed up by notching career highs of 16 goals and 66 points in the 1988–89 season.[7] He played two full seasons, and one game in the 1989–90 season, with the Devils before being traded to the Toronto Maple Leafs for the pick ultimately used to draft Scott Niedermayer.[8]

Kurvers was a highly skilled, puck-moving defenceman, especially dangerous on the power play.[9][10] Later in his career, Kurvers became a journeyman, making stops with the Vancouver Canucks, New York Islanders, and Mighty Ducks of Anaheim before leaving the league after the 1994–95 season.[1] He played a season in Japan before retiring.[11]

In his NHL career, Kurvers appeared in 659 games. He scored 93 goals and added 328 assists for 421 points.[11] He also appeared in 57 Stanley Cup playoff games, scoring eight goals and recording 22 assists.[12]

Post-hockey career

Following his retirement from playing professional hockey, Kurvers landed a job as a radio commentator for the Phoenix Coyotes, in part due to his connection to former Montreal teammate Bobby Smith who was the general manager in Phoenix at the time. Following one season in that capacity, he was hired as a professional scout by the Coyotes. Kurvers was promoted to director of player personnel in 2005.[13]

In 2008, Kurvers was named assistant general manager of the Tampa Bay Lightning.[1] He became the interim general manager for the Lightning at the end of the 2009–10 season.[14] From 2011 to 2018, Kurvers served as the senior advisor to the general manager of the Tampa Bay Lightning before being named the assistant general manager of the Minnesota Wild.[15]

Personal life

Born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Tom Kurvers grew up in nearby Bloomington.[16][17]

Kurvers and his wife Heather had two children together. He also had two daughters from his first marriage.[15] In January 2019, Kurvers was diagnosed with adenocarcinoma, a type of non-small-cell lung cancer.[18] Kurvers died on June 21, 2021, from cancer at the age of 58.[3]

Awards and honors

In 1991, Kurvers was inducted into the University of Minnesota Duluth Hall of Fame.[19]

Career statistics

Regular season and playoffs

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1979–80 Bloomington Jefferson High School HS-MN β€” β€” β€” β€” β€” β€” β€” β€” β€” β€”
1980–81 Bloomington Jefferson High School HS-MN β€” β€” β€” β€” β€” β€” β€” β€” β€” β€”
1980–81 University of Minnesota Duluth WCHA 39 6 24 30 48 β€” β€” β€” β€” β€”
1981–82 University of Minnesota Duluth WCHA 37 11 31 42 18 β€” β€” β€” β€” β€”
1982–83 University of Minnesota Duluth WCHA 45 8 36 44 42 β€” β€” β€” β€” β€”
1983–84 University of Minnesota Duluth WCHA 43 18 58 76 46 β€” β€” β€” β€” β€”
1984–85 Montreal Canadiens NHL 75 10 35 45 30 12 0 6 6 6
1985–86 Montreal Canadiens NHL 62 7 23 30 36 β€” β€” β€” β€” β€”
1986–87 Montreal Canadiens NHL 1 0 0 0 2 β€” β€” β€” β€” β€”
1986–87 Buffalo Sabres NHL 55 6 17 23 22 β€” β€” β€” β€” β€”
1987–88 New Jersey Devils NHL 56 5 29 34 46 19 6 9 15 38
1988–89 New Jersey Devils NHL 74 16 50 66 38 β€” β€” β€” β€” β€”
1989–90 New Jersey Devils NHL 1 0 0 0 0 β€” β€” β€” β€” β€”
1989–90 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 70 15 37 52 29 5 0 3 3 4
1990–91 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 19 0 3 3 8 β€” β€” β€” β€” β€”
1990–91 Vancouver Canucks NHL 32 4 23 27 20 6 2 2 4 12
1991–92 New York Islanders NHL 74 9 47 56 30 β€” β€” β€” β€” β€”
1992–93 Capital District Islanders AHL 7 3 4 7 8 β€” β€” β€” β€” β€”
1992–93 New York Islanders NHL 52 8 30 38 38 12 0 2 2 6
1993–94 New York Islanders NHL 66 9 31 40 47 3 0 0 0 2
1994–95 Mighty Ducks of Anaheim NHL 22 4 3 7 6 β€” β€” β€” β€” β€”
1995–96 Seibu Tetsudo JPN 40 18 34 52 85 2 1 2 3 36
NHL totals 659 93 328 421 352 57 8 22 30 68

Sources:[1][8][11][16][22][23][24]

International

Year Team Event GP G A Pts PIM
1982 United States WJC 7 3 3 6 16
1987 United States WC 10 3 1 4 11
1989 United States WC 10 2 2 4 8
Junior totals 7 3 3 6 16
Senior totals 20 5 3 8 19

Sources:[25][26][27]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Former Canadiens defenceman Tom Kurvers dies from lung cancer at 58". montrealgazette.com. Montreal Gazette. June 21, 2021.
  2. ^ "1984 Winner – TOM KURVERS of University of Minnesota-Duluth". hobeybaker.com. Retrieved July 17, 2018.
  3. ^ a b "Former NHL player Tom Kurvers dies at 58 from lung cancer". Associated Press. June 21, 2021. Retrieved June 21, 2021.
  4. ^ a b "Tom Kurvers Was A Major Part Of New Jersey Devils Success". Pucks and Pitchforks. June 21, 2021. Retrieved June 22, 2021.
  5. ^ Fischler, Stan (June 22, 2021). "Stan Fischler Remembers Tom Kurvers". NHL.com. Retrieved June 23, 2021. His career as a Devil was capped by a 15-point postseason during New Jersey's memorable 1988 playoff run.
  6. ^ "Tom Kurvers Stats and News". NHL.com. Retrieved June 23, 2021.
  7. ^ "Maple Leafs Trade Tree: Tom Kurvers - Sportsnet.ca". www.sportsnet.ca. Retrieved June 22, 2021.
  8. ^ a b Stellick, Gord (October 16, 2014). "Leafs revisionist history: Niedermayer trade". sportsnet.ca. Retrieved July 17, 2018.
  9. ^ Jana Hollingsworth; Chris Miller (June 21, 2021). "Wild assistant GM Tom Kurvers dies at age 58". Star Tribune. Retrieved June 23, 2021. Noted as a power-play specialist, he had 93 goals and 328 assists in 659 NHL games.
  10. ^ Kuzma, Ben (June 22, 2021). "Canucks: Former defenceman Tom Kurvers loses long battle with lung cancer". The Province. Retrieved June 23, 2021. ... a highly skilled, puck moving defenceman that was extremely dangerous on the power play,” Hrudey recalled Monday of the well-travelled Minneapolis, Minn., native, who would play for seven NHL clubs and just one partial season for Vancouver.
  11. ^ a b c "Kurvers dies at 58, was Wild assistant general manager". NHL.com. Retrieved June 22, 2021.
  12. ^ "Who is Tom Kurvers' wife, Heather? Late NHL manager's family explored". The Focus. June 22, 2021. Retrieved June 22, 2021.
  13. ^ Dahlia, Jeff (July 1, 2006). "Q&A with Tom Kurvers, Coyotes Director of Player Personnel". hockeysfuture.com. Retrieved July 17, 2018.
  14. ^ Reyes, Lorenzo. "Minnesota Wild assistant GM Tom Kurvers, former hockey great, dies of lung cancer at 58". USA TODAY. Retrieved June 22, 2021.
  15. ^ a b "Minnesota Wild names Tom Kurvers assistant general manager". NHL.com. June 26, 2018. Retrieved July 17, 2018.
  16. ^ a b "Former Habs player Tom Kurvers dead at 58 from lung cancer". cbc.ca. June 21, 2021.
  17. ^ Russo, Michael. "Wild assistant GM and Minnesota hockey legend Tom Kurvers dies after battle with cancer". The Athletic. Retrieved June 22, 2021.
  18. ^ Russo, Michael (February 8, 2019). "Diagnosed with lung cancer, Wild's Tom Kurvers prepares for his toughest battle". theathletic.com. Retrieved February 10, 2019.
  19. ^ "UMD Athletic Hall of Fame TOM KURVERS". umdbulldogs.com. Retrieved July 17, 2018.
  20. ^ "WCHA All-Teams". College Hockey Historical Archives. Retrieved May 19, 2013.
  21. ^ "Men's Ice Hockey Award Winners" (PDF). NCAA.org. Retrieved June 11, 2013.
  22. ^ am, Matt Wellens | 9:57; Jun. 21; 2021. "Bulldogs hockey legend Tom Kurvers dies at age 58". Duluth News Tribune. Retrieved June 22, 2021.CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  23. ^ "Wild assistant GM Tom Kurvers, a Stanley Cup champion from Bloomington, dies of lung cancer at 58". Twin Cities. June 21, 2021. Retrieved June 22, 2021.
  24. ^ "Tom Kurvers at eliteprospects.com". www.eliteprospects.com. Retrieved June 22, 2021.
  25. ^ "1982 WJC | U.S. National Junior Team Statistics". teamusa.usahockey.com. Retrieved June 22, 2021.
  26. ^ "1987 Roster". teamusa.usahockey.com. Retrieved June 22, 2021.
  27. ^ "1989 Roster". teamusa.usahockey.com. Retrieved June 22, 2021.

External links

Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Bob Mason
WCHA Player of the Year
1983–84
Succeeded by
Bill Watson
Preceded by
Mark Fusco
Winner of the Hobey Baker Award
1983–84
Succeeded by
Bill Watson
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Brian Lawton
General Manager of the Tampa Bay Lightning
Interim

2010
Succeeded by
Steve Yzerman

Copyright