Walworth County, Wisconsin

Walworth County
Walworth County Courthouse
Walworth County Courthouse
Map of Wisconsin highlighting Walworth County
Location within the U.S. state of Wisconsin
Map of the United States highlighting Wisconsin
Wisconsin's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 42°40′N 88°32′W / 42.67°N 88.54°W / 42.67; -88.54
Country  United States
State  Wisconsin
Founded 1839
Named for Reuben H. Walworth[1]
Seat Elkhorn
Largest city Whitewater
Area
 • Total 577 sq mi (1,490 km2)
 • Land 555 sq mi (1,440 km2)
 • Water 21 sq mi (50 km2)  3.7%%
Population
 (2010)
 • Total 104,504
 • Estimate 
(2020)
103,953
 • Density 180/sq mi (70/km2)
Time zone UTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST) UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional districts 1st, 5th
Website www.co.walworth.wi.us

Walworth County is a county located in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. As of the 2010 census, the population was 102,228.[2] Its county seat is Elkhorn.[3] The county was created in 1836 from Wisconsin Territory and organized in 1839.[4] It is named for Reuben H. Walworth.[5] Walworth County comprises the Whitewater-Elkhorn, WI Micropolitan Statistical Area and is included in the Milwaukee-Racine-Waukesha, WI Combined Statistical Area. Lake Geneva, the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, and Alpine Valley Resort, and Music Theatre are located in Walworth County.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 577 square miles (1,490 km2), of which 555 square miles (1,440 km2) is land and 21 square miles (54 km2) (3.7%) is water.[6]

Transportation

Major highways

Airport

East Troy Municipal Airport (FAA LID: 57C), serves the county and surrounding communities

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1840 2,611
1850 17,862 584.1%
1860 26,496 48.3%
1870 25,972 −2.0%
1880 26,249 1.1%
1890 27,860 6.1%
1900 29,259 5.0%
1910 29,614 1.2%
1920 29,327 −1.0%
1930 31,058 5.9%
1940 33,103 6.6%
1950 41,584 25.6%
1960 52,368 25.9%
1970 63,444 21.2%
1980 71,507 12.7%
1990 75,000 4.9%
2000 93,759 25.0%
2010 102,228 9.0%
2020 (est.) 103,953 [7] 1.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790–1960[9] 1900–1990[10]
1990–2000[11] 2010–2020[2]

At the 2000 census there were 93,759 people, 34,522 households, and 23,267 families in the county. The population density was 169 people per square mile (65/km2). There were 43,783 housing units at an average density of 79 per square mile (30/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 94.49% White, 0.84% Black or African American, 0.23% Native American, 0.65% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 2.62% from other races, and 1.14% from two or more races. 6.54% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.[12] Of the 34,522 households 31.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.40% were married couples living together, 8.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.60% were non-families. 24.70% of households were one person and 9.20% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.07.

The age distribution was 24.20% under the age of 18, 13.80% from 18 to 24, 27.60% from 25 to 44, 21.80% from 45 to 64, and 12.70% 65 or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 98.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.20 males.

In 2017, there were 918 births, giving a general fertility rate of 48.8 births per 1000 women aged 15–44, the sixth lowest rate out of all 72 Wisconsin counties.[13]

Communities

Walworth County sign

Cities

Villages

Towns

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities

Ghost towns

Politics

Owing to its Yankee heritage,[14] which contrasts with the German-American or Scandinavian-American character of most of Wisconsin, Walworth County was initially a stronghold of the Free Soil Party.[15] It voted for Martin van Buren and John P. Hale in Wisconsin's first two presidential elections,[16] and its opposition to the spread of slavery meant it became Republican in subsequent elections,[16] even resisting the appeal of Wisconsin native Robert La Follette when he carried the state in 1924.[17]

Walworth[17] County remains strongly Republican.[18] The only Democrat to carry the county was Woodrow Wilson in 1912, who won 36 percent of the vote. Even with the GOP mortally divided between President William Howard Taft and Theodore Roosevelt, Wilson only won the county by 29 votes. The best Democratic showings since then have been by Lyndon Johnson in 1964 and Barack Obama in 2008, both of whom received around 48 percent. Franklin D. Roosevelt and Bill Clinton are the only other Democrats since Wilson to cross the 40 percent mark, though Joe Biden came very close in 2020.

See also

References

  1. ^ "County Directory - Walworth County". Wisconsin Counties Association. Retrieved May 13, 2007.[dead link]
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on January 28, 2016. Retrieved January 24, 2014.
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. ^ "Wisconsin: Individual County Chronologies". Wisconsin Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2007. Archived from the original on April 14, 2017. Retrieved August 15, 2015.
  5. ^ "Winnebago Took Its Name from an Indian Tribe". The Post-Crescent. December 28, 1963. p. 14. Retrieved August 25, 2014 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved August 9, 2015.
  7. ^ "County Population Totals: 2010-2020". Retrieved June 20, 2021.
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 9, 2015.
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved August 9, 2015.
  10. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 9, 2015.
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved August 9, 2015.
  12. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  13. ^ "Annual Wisconsin Birth and Infant Mortality Report, 2017 P-01161-19 (June 2019): Detailed Tables". Archived from the original on June 19, 2019. Retrieved June 19, 2019.
  14. ^ Fowler, Robert Booth; Wisconsin Vites: An Electoral History, p. 14 ISBN 0299227448
  15. ^ Fowler, Robert Booth; Wisconsin Votes: An Electoral History, Volume 3, p. 11 ISBN 0299227405
  16. ^ a b Beckwith, Albert Clayton; History of Walworth County, Wisconsin pp. 98-99 Published 1912 by B.F. Bowen and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana
  17. ^ a b See Phillips, Kevin P.; The Emerging Republican Majority, pp. 441-442 ISBN 978-0-691-16324-6
  18. ^ See McDade, Philip J.; ‘Congressional Restricting in Wisconsin’
  19. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved November 11, 2020.

Further reading

External links

Coordinates: 42°40′N 88°32′W / 42.67°N 88.54°W / 42.67; -88.54

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