William H. Hornibrook

William H. Hornibrook
United States Minister to Costa Rica
In office
September 2, 1937 β€“ September 1, 1941
President Franklin D. Roosevelt
Preceded by Leo R. Sack
Succeeded by Arthur Bliss Lane
1st United States Minister to Afghanistan
In office
May 4, 1935 β€“ March 16, 1936
President Franklin D. Roosevelt
Preceded by Diplomatic relations established
Succeeded by Louis G. Dreyfus
United States Minister to Iran
In office
March 19, 1934 β€“ March 16, 1936
President Franklin D. Roosevelt
Preceded by Charles C. Hart
Succeeded by Louis G. Dreyfus (1940)
United States Minister to Siam
In office
May 31, 1915 β€“ October 24, 1916
President Woodrow Wilson
Preceded by Fred Warner Carpenter
Succeeded by George Pratt Ingersoll
Member of the Idaho Senate
from the Twin Falls district
In office
1910–1912
Personal details
Born (1884-07-06)July 6, 1884
Cherokee, Iowa
Died March 20, 1946(1946-03-20) (aged 61)
Pacific Grove, California
Spouse(s)
Yolande Wilson
​
( m.  1906) ​

William Harrison Hornibrook (July 6, 1884 – October 24, 1946) was an American publisher, politician, and diplomat.

Biography

Hornibrook, born on July 6, 1884, started his career as a newspaper publisher in 1906;[1] at one point or another, he owned both the predecessors to The Columbian and the Albany Democrat-Herald, along with various other papers.[2]

In November 1906,[1] he married Yolande Wilson, with whom he had two children, a son and a daughter.[3]

A Democrat, Hornibrook was elected to the Idaho State Senate, from Twin Falls County,[4] serving from 1911 to 1912,[5] before his resignation.[6]

He served as US ambassador to Thailand (then Siam) from 1915–1916, later as ambassador to Iran from 1934–1936 and Afghanistan from 1935–1936, while resident in Tehran.[7] After the recognition of the Afghan government led by King Zahir Shah in August 1934, Hornibrook, from Utah, was appointed the first minister to Afghanistan.[8]

From 1937–1941, he was ambassador to Costa Rica.[7][9]

He died in March 1946, in Pacific Grove, California.[10]

References

  1. ^ a b "Former Utah Publisher Wills Estate to Widow". The Salt Lake Tribune. April 6, 1946. p. 17. Retrieved July 12, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.
  2. ^ "Hornibrook, Publisher, Dies". Santa Cruz Sentinel. March 23, 1946. p. 1. Retrieved July 12, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ "Wife of Newly Appointed Minister to Foreign Post". The Courier-News. August 28, 1937. p. 13. Retrieved July 12, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.
  4. ^ "News of the Week". The Commoner. January 27, 1911. p. 10. Retrieved July 12, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ "Idaho Blue Book: State Senate" (PDF). sos.idaho.gov. 2017. p. 180. Retrieved July 12, 2018.
  6. ^ "Death of William H. Hornibrook Ends Colorful Political Career". Albany Democrat-Herald. March 23, 1946. p. 8. Retrieved July 12, 2018 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ a b "William Harrison Hornibrook - People - Department History - Office of the Historian". Retrieved 6 July 2014.
  8. ^ "ENVOY TO AFGHANISTAN.; W.H. Hornibrook of Utah Named Our First Minister to Country". The New York Times. January 15, 1935. Retrieved July 6, 2018.
  9. ^ Herzog, JesΓΊs Silva (2006). Cuadernos americanos. p. 109. Cite has empty unknown parameter: |1= (help)
  10. ^ "Hornibrook, Publisher, Dies". Santa Cruz Sentinel. 1946-03-23. Retrieved 2019-04-10.
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Fred Warner Carpenter
United States Minister to Siam
1915-1916
Succeeded by
George Pratt Ingersoll
Preceded by
Charles C. Hart
United States Minister to Iran
1934–1936
Succeeded by
Louis G. Dreyfus Jr.
New title
Diplomatic relations established
United States Minister to Afghanistan
1935-1936
Succeeded by
Louis G. Dreyfus Jr.
Preceded by
Leo R. Sack
United States Minister to Costa Rica
1937-1941
Succeeded by
Arthur Bliss Lane


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